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Home Field Advantage - Does it Exist?

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  • #91
    Maybe you're just in the wrong mud puddle.
    Let me get this straight: because Stolensingle has beliefs that cause him to reach a conclusion that excludes a oppossing belief, he's somehow wrong?
    Huh?

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    • #92
      Two things to consider (I apologize if somebody in the prior 6 pages has mentioned this):

      1. Teams have adjusted their ballpark dimensions in the past to take advantage of certain players' abilities.

      Boston created Williamsburg to cut distance off the right field power alley for Ted Williams

      Pittsburgh created Greenberg Gardens and Kiners Korner in left and left center in the late 1940's through mid 1950's, and then once both players were gone, they took the inner fence in.

      The Washington Senators brought their left field fence in by 50 feet at the line for Roy Sievers, Jim Lemon, and Harmon Killebrew.

      Groundskeepers in Chicago at Comiskey Park fidgeted with the field to help keep bunts fair and to make the ground from first to second firmer to help base stealing.

      Obviously, if changing the dimensions of the park can buy just one extra win per year, then the park can be somewhat tailored to the players.

      Obviously as well, teams can strategize player acquisition to help score more runs and prevent more opponent runs. For years, the Yankees always looked for young left-handed arms that could entice more fly balls to left and left-center where it was Death Valley.

      2. The strategy of the game gives the home team an advantage, even if the teams play in the same ballpark every week. Knowing that in the bottom of the 9th (or 7th for high school), that you must score X runs to force extra innings and X+1 to win, while the other team does not have this advantage, it is worth a couple percentage points. In a tie game, the road team cannot play for one run unless they have Dennis Eckersley in the bullpen. The home team can play for one run in a tie in the last inning.

      I have always said that a small market GM and owner would be wise to turn their home park into another Colt Stadium or Exposition Field in Pittsburgh. Go with extremely deep fences all the way around with high walls. Have lots of foul territory all the way around the park. Then, go out and find the best line drive hitters with speed and quickness. Look for pitchers that induce a lot of fly balls. Let the 30-homer big leaguers try to succeed where it takes monumental tape measure shots to hit homers, and a 375 foot blast becomes a can of corn out.

      If just one team tries this, they will win. There hasn't really been a franchise that planned to win by contact and speed on offense and by pitchers that showed great control and didn't walk many batters but didn't strike out many either. The 1985 St. Louis Cardinals were the last team to even come close to this. I went to Busch Stadium for a handful of games that summer, and in my opinion, those Cardinals games were much more exciting than watching today's games. There were always exciting plays on the bases and home plate. The Cardinals frequently reached base on infield ground balls. It was hard to get a double play on them. They stole bases like a Dead Ball team, and they led the league in runs scored with something like 85 homers. They stole more than 300 bases. Their pitchers gave up the fewest homers, as Busch Stadium was not a homer friendly place then. Teams hit a lot of fly ball outs against them.

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      • #93
        Home ops is usually 20-30 points higher than road ops across the league and home era is around 0.2 lower than road era.

        So there seems to be an advantage whatever that is. Maybe umps are hesitant to make close calls against home team due to fear of getting booed (subconsciously). Or the travel stress and preparation make it easier at home. Or something else
        I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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        • #94
          Originally posted by dominik View Post
          Home ops is usually 20-30 points higher than road ops across the league and home era is around 0.2 lower than road era.

          So there seems to be an advantage whatever that is. Maybe umps are hesitant to make close calls against home team due to fear of getting booed (subconsciously). Or the travel stress and preparation make it easier at home. Or something else
          I doubt that, that it would make a significant difference in home and road. Not to say some umps could be influenced in favor of the home team, very small.
          Are you speaking of team or individual player home/road OPS

          As we know many times the team will carry hitters who fit the park, the type that would benefit from playing in that home park.
          Also not sure if this is the correct word, "comfort" playing at home, often living there, that city.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by dominik View Post
            Maybe umps are hesitant to make close calls against home team due to fear of getting booed (subconsciously).
            That is the major factor supporting HFA, I believe quite a few studies have come to this conclusion.

            https://blogs.fangraphs.com/is-home-...ng-endangered/

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