Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oddity 162WL% for teams is so small variation

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oddity 162WL% for teams is so small variation

    Also thought this was odd: https://www.baseball-reference.com/l...-batting.shtml

    No team registered above .509 based on team offense. How does that make sense? It's similar for other seasons too and includes fielding and there are similar numbers for pitching!

    Take for example the '27 Yankees. https://www.baseball-reference.com/l...-batting.shtml

    The position players scored 27.7 wins above average, but the 162 game winning percentage based on the offense was only .515?

  • #2
    So for teams they simply took the unweighted average of all players waaWL%. It is very easy to do it for a team. You take 81 + WAA for the team divided by 162.

    Comment


    • #3
      So good pitching beats good hitting?
      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
        So good pitching beats good hitting?
        The real answer is that they team waaWL% is not the team value, but the average value of all the players. It would be like calculating team batting average by just averaging the batting averages of every player who comes to bat for the team in the season without regard to how many at bats each one had.

        Comment


        • #5
          I see. I'm dumb when it comes to the stat stuff as you well know. I was just wondering if in a roundabout way it confirmed the old axiom.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment

          Ad Widget

          Collapse
          Working...
          X