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What does (break degrees) mean? and how it is calculated?

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  • What does (break degrees) mean? and how it is calculated?

    hello,
    in mlb live scores stats there is a break degrees (like curveball 20 degrees) what it is ?
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  • #2
    A circle is 360 degrees. 180 degrees is a half circle. 90 degrees would be like the pitcher throwing to home plate but with the ball turning hard left or right and going to either first or third base.

    So, when the pitcher throws the ball and it breaks 22.8 degrees, that's the circular arc of the ball's path.
    Put it in the books.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by milladrive View Post
      A circle is 360 degrees. 180 degrees is a half circle. 90 degrees would be like the pitcher throwing to home plate but with the ball turning hard left or right and going to either first or third base.

      So, when the pitcher throws the ball and it breaks 22.8 degrees, that's the circular arc of the ball's path.
      1) does this mean it takes the horizental aspect only (no matter how the ball goes up or down) ?

      2) The arc angle is between the straight hypothetical line from the release point and the straight line (backward) from the point the ball contact the strike zone (the level which contains strike zone)?
      or, between the straight hypothetical line from the release angle and the straight line (backward) from the point the ball contact the strike zone (the level which contains strike zone)?

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      • #4
        Why do I keep getting notifications for this thread I'm not subscribed to?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by huab View Post

          1) does this mean it takes the horizental aspect only (no matter how the ball goes up or down) ?

          2) The arc angle is between the straight hypothetical line from the release point and the straight line (backward) from the point the ball contact the strike zone (the level which contains strike zone)?
          or, between the straight hypothetical line from the release angle and the straight line (backward) from the point the ball contact the strike zone (the level which contains strike zone)?
          1. The break isn't on a plane; it's on the circumference of a globe. However, the break will always depend on the pitch. Obviously, a curveball has more break than a fastball. Oh, and of course, gravity always dictates the ball's ultimate direction.

          2. I believe, simply put, it's the arc the ball takes from the pitcher's hand to the catcher's mitt, regardless of angle. After all, the angle will always be different from pitcher to pitcher, and indeed from pitch to pitch. ...But better minds than mine may have more info on the intricacies of this.
          Put it in the books.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
            Why do I keep getting notifications for this thread I'm not subscribed to?
            Your guess is as good as mine. I've never heard of it happening before, so I guess the best thing is to see if it happens again.
            Put it in the books.

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            • #7
              I asked mlb.com support and I want to share with you the answer:
              ..describes the movement of each pitch with two values: Pitch-F/x versus Break.
              • The Pitch-f/x or 'PFX' value is the distance between the location of the actual pitch, and the calculated location of a ball thrown by the pitcher in the same way but with no spin; this is the amount of 'movement' the pitcher applies to the pitch.
              • Break is the greatest distance between the trajectory of the pitch at any point between the release point and the front of home plate, and the straight line path from the release point and the front of home plate.
              • A faster, straighter pitch like a fastball will have a higher Pitch-F/x value than a slower, breaking ball like a curveball, which will have a higher break.
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