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Ted Williams vs. Left-handed Pitchers

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  • Originally posted by SWCBaseball View Post
    I doubt I have a right-handed hitter on my team to put into LF that would do a better job. Maybe, I am wrong but .311 against LHP? And OPS of .928?
    There are (at least) 22 RHH with a higher OPS against LHP than Ted Williams (min 2,000 PA). I say "at least" because the PBP data is either non existent or highly incomplete for old timers like Lajoie, Wagner, Delahanty, etc.

    (In other words...the best RHH of the first 50 years of MLB.)

    Screenshot_20180902-220204_Chrome.jpg
    Last edited by Floyd Gondolli; 09-03-2018, 04:02 AM.

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    • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post

      That is a valid point..of course had he played ball in those years he might have broke a wrist, who knows.

      Another vailid point, is that if he had to hit in old Fenway, versus more left handed pitching, with dead ball agaist trick pitches...his numbers would suffer. Hell, leave everything the same and ONLY change Fenway back to old dimensions he loses about 50 career home HR based on known landing points.
      Sultan_1895-1948

      Probably more than 50.

      From 1912-1919 the Red Sox hit 67 home runs at Fenway Park. And most of those were inside the park jobs which Williams never hit because he 1. Was slow as molasses and 2. Didn't run the bases aggressively. In fact his baserunning stats are a joke even compared to and OLD Babe Ruth (1925-1935).

      From 1912-1919 they Red Sox hit 194 home runs on the road. 194 vs 67. No small difference.

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      • Thanks for the information. I really like it. I did not know I was arguing anything but was only stating a general opinion. But I do love the information.... Because of your post, I wondered how Williams contemporary Stan Musial did against LHP so I looked him up and he was better against LHP than Williams was as well. Musial in 3908 ab, had 157 HR, .316/.394/.528 against LHP.

        No argument about Ruth but I tend to put him in my line-up as a RF since he played the most games there, 1132 to 1050.

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        • Originally posted by Floyd Gondolli View Post

          Sultan_1895-1948

          Probably more than 50.

          From 1912-1919 the Red Sox hit 67 home runs at Fenway Park. And most of those were inside the park jobs which Williams never hit because he 1. Was slow as molasses and 2. Didn't run the bases aggressively. In fact his baserunning stats are a joke even compared to and OLD Babe Ruth (1925-1935).

          From 1912-1919 they Red Sox hit 194 home runs on the road. 194 vs 67. No small difference.
          Ted Williams was born in 1918. I don't think those are the reasons why he never hit those home runs.

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          • Originally posted by pedrosrotatorcuff View Post

            Ted Williams was born in 1918. I don't think those are the reasons why he never hit those home runs.
            What does his year of birth have to do with it? Regarding inside the park homers you need dimensions conducive for them, and a runner not only with some speed, but the aggressive mindset to keep it in third gear between 2nd and 3rd and make the final turn home. Ballgame wore cement boots broheem.

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            • Originally posted by leecemark View Post
              Hitch, I followed the link to the article and it said "based on his career totals his stats were better in virtually every category for the missing years". Without seeing any numbers I would have assumed Williams, like virtually every other LHB, didn't do as well against LHP. He was still pretty damn good against them though. I think modern LHB might be expected to do a little better against LHP than old timers for this reason - There are alot of left handed pitchers in the majors today who don't belong there. Everyone knows that LHP have an advantage over LHB, but bad lefties aren't really a better option than good righties when you've got a tough left handed batter to retire. The new conventional "wisdom" that you need a couple lefties in the pen as specialists goes against all logic. Sorry to have diverged from your topic, just a pet peeve of mine.
              I would disagree with the above assertion that, today, "there are a lot of left-handed pitchers in the majors today who don't belong there." In this modern sabermetric era, I think the ability to find and identify talented left-handed pitchers is actually GREATER than it was in the past. The left-handed specialists of today (something that didn't exist in the past) are particularly adept at retiring LHBs, often coming in to pitch to a single LHB in a critical situation.

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