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Situational hitting

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  • brett
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
    Just so happens, as if he has no control? There's a skill to hitting flies and having a runner on third with less than two outs can change your approach at the plate. A ball up early in the count, easy run. Swinging for contact decreases the odds of striking out and increases the odds of that run being driven in. That being said, some sac flies are simply happenstance.
    as are some hits.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Murderers Row View Post
    I never understood the SF, He is swinging away. What is he sacraficing? It just so happens he hit a deep FB.
    Just so happens, as if he has no control? There's a skill to hitting flies and having a runner on third with less than two outs can change your approach at the plate. A ball up early in the count, easy run. Swinging for contact decreases the odds of striking out and increases the odds of that run being driven in. That being said, some sac flies are simply happenstance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tango Tiger
    replied
    Originally posted by brett View Post
    Non event. I was actually looking at batting average in these cases, because they are cases where a single is worth relatively more than normal versus a walk. Batting and slugging were lowest with a runner on third only and seemed to be highest with a runner on second only.
    Obviously you need to count it as an out.

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  • stevebogus
    replied
    Originally posted by brett View Post
    I noticed that a lot of hitters hit better than normal with a runner on third base only.

    Also batters tend to bat below normal with runner of second only.

    Is this a trend or am I not looking at enough hitters?

    I assume that situation 1 may be due to the pitcher going from the stretch and situation 2 may be due to the middle infielders not playing out of position.

    Another question. Why exactly does BAbip rise for a pitcher as he goes deeper into the game? I though that BAbip was supposed to stay constant for a pitcher. It makes sense that it would rise because of the pitcher losing some of his stuff.

    I think you have to assess what the pitcher, batter, and defense are trying to accomplish in different situations. You also have to be aware of how many outs there are.

    With a runner on third and less than 2 outs: the sac fly is in play, which does not count as an at-bat, raising batting averages as a result. The outfield would play shallow because any deep fly will score the runner anyway. The infield would play shallow as well, to try to keep the runner from scoring on a groundball. A shallow outfield would probably take away more hits than they give up, since more shallow flies are hit than deep flies. But the drawn-in infield would probably allow more grounders to get through for hits. With two out there is no need for the defense to play shallow, the sac fly cannot occur, and I expect that the batter's advantage disappears.

    With a runner on secondbase only: the fielders can play more or less where they normally play. It might interfere with using an infield shift on a lefty pull-hitter (the thirdbaseman must remain near the bag to cover any steal attempt).

    As for BAbip increasing as pitchers go deeper into the game, remember that batters are reacting to the pitcher. Each pitcher has a different assortment of pitches, different release point, different movement. The more a batter sees of a pitcher the better he is able to predict the location of the pitches, and so his ability to hit the ball hard increases with experience. The idea that BAbip is "supposed" to stay constant is a misunderstanding. While a pitcher may have very limited ability to control BAbip that does not mean BAbip is a constant. It changes with the game situation.

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  • Murderers Row
    replied
    I never understood the SF, He is swinging away. What is he sacraficing? It just so happens he hit a deep FB.

    Leave a comment:


  • brett
    replied
    Originally posted by Tango Tiger View Post
    Are you counting SF as a non-event, or as an out?
    Non event. I was actually looking at batting average in these cases, because they are cases where a single is worth relatively more than normal versus a walk. Batting and slugging were lowest with a runner on third only and seemed to be highest with a runner on second only.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tango Tiger
    replied
    Are you counting SF as a non-event, or as an out?

    Leave a comment:


  • brett
    started a topic Situational hitting

    Situational hitting

    I noticed that a lot of hitters hit better than normal with a runner on third base only.

    Also batters tend to bat below normal with runner of second only.

    Is this a trend or am I not looking at enough hitters?

    I assume that situation 1 may be due to the pitcher going from the stretch and situation 2 may be due to the middle infielders not playing out of position.

    Another question. Why exactly does BAbip rise for a pitcher as he goes deeper into the game? I though that BAbip was supposed to stay constant for a pitcher. It makes sense that it would rise because of the pitcher losing some of his stuff.
    Last edited by brett; 03-12-2008, 05:00 PM.

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