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Ubiquitous...anyone who knows...little help?

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  • #16
    Thank you very much!

    The book says blurb was my idea, which I borrowed from Earl Weaver's book, with "Weaver's Laws". I agree with your assessment, and that was the reason we did it. The book requires a certain level of reader commitment, which I don't think might always be there. So, a reader can skip things he's not interested in, and go to the "executive summary" to catch up, and continue reading. Each chapter was written solo, so that form forced us a bit to conform to some common style.

    Thanks again!
    Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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    • #17
      The other day we were talking about something in the "Left, Right, Left, Right" section. In it you guys talk about the possibility of keeping two pitchers in that game at the same time to always have the platoon advantage. The other day it came up in another thread here and it turns out that a pitcher may only swap a position once an inning.

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      • #18
        Wow, you guys are absolutely right. Rule 3.03 states:

        "A pitcher may change to another position only once during the same inning; e.g. the pitcher will not be allowed to assume a position other than a pitcher more than once in the same inning. "

        When was this added to the rule?
        Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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        • #19
          Not entirely sure when it was added, but I believe it was added specifically to prevent the situation you mentioned (keeping a pitcher in the field to get a platoon advantage)...I could of course be wrong.

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          • #20
            I don't know how long it has been on the books but I bet it has been on the books for awhile. The 3.** go all the way up to 3.18. Of course it could simply be an attachment.

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            • #21
              Definitely it would be an attachment. I'm sure I've seen this back-and-forth done by the Mets or Yanks or Larussa in the 80s or early 90s. I've got John Franco in my head for some reason. If SABRMatt has his Retrosheet data handy, he can look for it. Otherwise, I'll check it at home tonight.
              Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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              • #22
                I was close. It was Jesse Orosco.

                http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B07220CIN1986.htm

                Start from the 10th inning on. From the description, it looks like they did the flipping just once each inning, for 4 innings.
                Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                • #23
                  Jeff Nelson did a P, LF, P move, but there is no PBP available for this game:

                  http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B07150BOS1993.htm
                  Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                  • #24
                    Now, there's this game here:

                    http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B06180DET1967.htm

                    Catfish Hunter, with a 4-run lead, in the 9th inning and 2 outs, was removed and put on 1B. If that part of the rule was still in effect, this would mean that Catfish would only be able to pitch in the 10th. But, how likely is this to happen? His team would have to squander a 4-run lead with 1 out to go. Wouldn't the team leave the 1B (Webster), in there, as he certainly has alot more value than having Catfish around to maybe pitch in the 10th? Seems to me that Catfish would have been brought back to pitch if things got bad in the 9th.
                    Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                    • #25
                      Finally, I got one!

                      http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B06060TOR1989.htm

                      BLUE JAYS 9TH: CRIM REPLACED ALDRICH (PITCHING); ... CRIM REPLACED BROCK (PLAYING 1B); ...CRIM CHANGED POSITIONS (PITCHING);

                      And he got the save.

                      So, the earliest possible date for this new rule was 1990.
                      Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                      • #26
                        Really interesting...

                        Strikes me as odd that they would bother tacking on the rule as an attachment unless someone did something that would make an issue of it...

                        It'd have to be something like fielding 3 pitchers atthe same time so he you could use each of the three to get specific hitters out or something...LOL If there was a new-rule addition after 1990, I'd think I'd remember the reason why...

                        Any ideas?

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                        • #27
                          My guess is when they introduced the "speed-up" rules, that they identified this as a concern. Maybe it is in high school, but I don't see why they'd consider this in MLB.
                          Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                          • #28
                            Good theory Tango...

                            That could possibly be where it came into play. It does strike me as a bit silly to be preoccupied with that though.

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                            • #29
                              By the way, we've been reading this rule wrong:

                              "A pitcher may change to another position only once during the same inning; e.g. the pitcher will not be allowed to assume a position other than a pitcher more than once in the same inning. "

                              While the first half looks ambiguous, the second half is not. The player is in fact allowed to be a pitcher more than once in the same inning. A P, LF, P scenario is permitted, based on the e.g. wording.

                              Whether P, LF, RF, P is permitted based on the wording is not clear to me, since the LF to RF switch did not involve "the pitcher".
                              Author of THE BOOK -- Playing The Percentages In Baseball

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                              • #30
                                Actually that was how I was viewing it. I viewed it as a pitcher could go P, then LF and then pitcher again but after that he could not move to another position.

                                So if you have two pitchers a righty and a lefty and the batting order is R, L, R, L, R, L and the righty faces the right hander walks him moves to left and the lefty comes into face the lefty strikes him out the righty can come in face the right handed batter but then cannot move out to left field to let the lefty back on the mound. He would have to leave the game and then the lefty could pitch but now the lefty after that could not move positions in that inning.

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