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at-bat differerential of battings champs

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  • at-bat differerential of battings champs

    does anyone know the greatest differential of at-bats in one season between the nl batting champion and the al champ? this comes to mind after comparing suziki's and bonds' on-pace numbers. it is difficult for me to put my mind around those numbers. i mean, if it continues to play out this way, this will be quite a spread! iciro may end up with nearly twice the number of at-bats than barry.
    Last edited by tony mariscal; 08-15-2004, 04:18 PM.
    to start a game the umpire says "play ball", not "work ball".

  • #2
    Originally posted by tony mariscal
    does anyone know the greatest differential of at-bats in one season between the nl batting champion and the al champ? this comes to mind after comparing suziki's and bonds' on-pace numbers. it is difficult for me to put my mind around those numbers. i mean, if it continues to play out this way, this will be quite a spread! iciro may end up with nearly twice the number of at-bats than barry.
    65 in 1975
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RuthMayBond
      65 in 1975
      ??? Why do you say that? It was 129 in 1980...
      "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

      Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ElHalo
        ??? Why do you say that? It was 129 in 1980...
        Um, why am I thinking it was 29 in 1980?
        Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
        Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RuthMayBond
          Um, why am I thinking it was 29 in 1980?
          Not sure... George Brett, AL champ, had 449 AB's in 117 games, while Bill Buckner, NL champ, had 578 in 145 games.
          "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

          Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ElHalo
            Not sure... George Brett, AL champ, had 449 AB's in 117 games, while Bill Buckner, NL champ, had 578 in 145 games.
            Ah, because I was looking at the difference between the league leaders in AT-BATS and NOT the difference in at-bats between the BA leaders
            Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
            Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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            • #7
              In 1942 Ernie Lombardi had 309 AB while Ted Williams had 522.

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              • #8
                so... this season's spread will be the all-time largest if suzuki and bonds continue to do their thing? agreed, or does anyone else have anything else?
                to start a game the umpire says "play ball", not "work ball".

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                • #9
                  In 1914 Ty Cobb had 345 at bats in only 98 games, but was certified nonetheless by Ban Johnson as AL batting champion that year with a .368 average. (under todays rules, Eddie Collins who hit .344 and had 526 at bats, would have been the AL batting champ.) Jake Daubert led the NL in 1914 with a .329 BA in 474 at bats for Brooklyn. That is a difference of 129 AB. Ernie Lombardi's 1942 NL batting crown came with only 309 AB's, he hit .330. Under modern day rules, the 1942 NL batting king would have been Enos Slaughter, with a BA of .318 compiled in 591 AB's.

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                  • #10
                    Enlightening post there. What exactly where the old rules, if any, to determine a batting champion?
                    1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

                    1889 1890 1899 1900 1916 1920
                    1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1956
                    1966 1974 1977 1978


                    1983 1985 1995 2004 2008 2009
                    2013 2014


                    1996 2006

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                    • #11
                      Different rules for qualification have been used at various times... I believe todays rules call for an average of 3.1 PA per game scheduled or 502 PA per season. At various times in BB history the standard has been 400 *at bats* with only 300 needed for catchers, which is how catchers Bubbles Hargrave (1926) and Ernie Lombardi (1942) were each able to pick up one NL batting crown. Lombardi won 2 in his career, one of which (1938) meets the modern day standards for qualification. There have been several batting champs of the past who dont meet todays qualification standards. I also believe at least briefly there was a 100 games played standard also. It seems to me at least one source (The Reach Guide?) credits Taffy Wright with a 1938 AL Batting Title even though he was only 92 for 263 for a .350 average. He played in exactly 100 games that season. Cobb's 1914 Batting Title doesnt meet *any* qualification standard that I am aware of which makes it curious as to why he "won" it. As an aside, it's known today via errors in totaling and scoring that Nap Lajoie should be the 1910 batting champ over Cobb also.

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