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  • standings question

    Is percentage always the determining factor in baseball standings? For example, lead team is 17-7 .708
    second place team is 14-8, .636 2games back. Third place team is 15-9, .625, also 2 games back. If season ended, would second place team take second based on higher winning pct?

  • #2
    In a word, yes.
    Your Second Base Coach
    Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

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    • #3
      Originally posted by banny View Post
      Is percentage always the determining factor in baseball standings? For example, lead team is 17-7 .708
      second place team is 14-8, .636 2games back. Third place team is 15-9, .625, also 2 games back. If season ended, would second place team take second based on higher winning pct?
      To give a little more elaboration, in cases such as these, the team with the fewer losses tends to be ranked higher on the bottom line. As Second Base Coach intimated, the highest percentage takes the lead. For instance, a record of 13-7, also two games out in second place, but with a .650 percentage, would beat both of your second-place examples.
      Put it in the books.

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      • #4
        You will sometimes see the percentage leader listed at the top of the standings when a half game behind, say 7-3 vs 9-4.
        Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
          You will sometimes see the percentage leader listed at the top of the standings when a half game behind, say 7-3 vs 9-4.
          Yes sir, I too have seen that type of thing, usually in the beginning of the season.
          Put it in the books.

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          • #6
            In 1942, the 5th place NL team had 2 fewer wins than the 6th place team.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by milladrive View Post
              To give a little more elaboration, in cases such as these, the team with the fewer losses tends to be ranked higher on the bottom line. As Second Base Coach intimated, the highest percentage takes the lead. For instance, a record of 13-7, also two games out in second place, but with a .650 percentage, would beat both of your second-place examples.
              What it one team is 8-9 and another is 7-8?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by brett View Post
                What it one team is 8-9 and another is 7-8?
                Excellent point. It seems to me that the "fewer losses" theory works when the W/L records are over .500, while the team with fewer wins takes it when under .500. And it seems to make sense from a mathematical standpoint. I'm imagining we don't think about the losing records as much because we also see it happen with .500 records, for which the team with fewer losses gets the higher berth.

                Originally posted by ipitch View Post
                In 1942, the 5th place NL team had 2 fewer wins than the 6th place team.
                I love this site.
                Put it in the books.

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