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Decade stolen bases ranked by spot in the batting order (AL & NL)

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  • Decade stolen bases ranked by spot in the batting order (AL & NL)

    Is there a way to get a rank of what spots in the batting order had the most stolen bases?

    For example
    in the AL for the 1970s: 1, 2, 9, 7, 8, 3, 6, 5, 4
    in the NL for the 1970s: 1, 2, 7, 8, 3, 6, 5, 4, 9

    Or if not by decade then a cumulative over the history of the game? or from the 1950 to current?
    ?

  • #2
    Just guessing, but I bet your example is pretty close...
    Your Second Base Coach
    Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

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    • #3
      For the past 3 seasons, the top 4 spots have been 1, 2, 3, 6.

      Here is a starting point. If you want to do it by decade, you'll have to get your calculator out and add up each season.
      http://www.baseball-reference.com/le...ear=2011#lineu
      http://www.baseball-reference.com/le...ear=2010#lineu
      http://www.baseball-reference.com/le...ear=2009#lineu

      Links to AL or NL only are at the top of the pages.

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      • #4
        I ran it through my retrosheet database and posted my results from 1950-2010 HERE. The table includes post-season data except for the 2010 season, which I deliberately left out in order to cross-check my results with B-Ref.
        UI2
        BTB

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JDanger View Post
          I ran it through my retrosheet database and posted my results from 1950-2010 HERE. The table includes post-season data except for the 2010 season, which I deliberately left out in order to cross-check my results with B-Ref.
          Wow, thanks. That's pretty interesting data. I'm rather surprised by the amount of SBs in the middle of the order vs. the end of the order. I know the middle get's more PA & AB than the end of the order but I figured that there was more speed at the end of the order. Maybe the middle of the order is the beneficiary of being on the backend of a lot of double-steals?
          ?

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          • #6
            Yeah, you can see how managers choose to arrange their batting orders, as the cleanup slot is nearly always a significant drop off from the 1,2,3 slots. Except in the '80s-- everybody ran in the '80s.

            An SB/PA rate stat would definitely help to clarify things; if I get time tonight I'll give it a run.
            UI2
            BTB

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            • #7
              OK, here is the same chart with SB/PA added. Its a google doc, so you can play around with the sort. For instance, the highest SB/PA of this group is the 1980's NL lead-off hitters (9.83%). The lowest is 1950's NL Pitchers (.26%).

              https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...XQ4a2hsOVU0VlE
              UI2
              BTB

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JDanger View Post
                OK, here is the same chart with SB/PA added. Its a google doc, so you can play around with the sort. For instance, the highest SB/PA of this group is the 1980's NL lead-off hitters (9.83%). The lowest is 1950's NL Pitchers (.26%).

                https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...XQ4a2hsOVU0VlE
                Adding the PAs was helpful. I threw it into Microsoft Excel and applied some conditional formatting to it too. Clearly the DH makes a difference. The AL utilizes more speed at the bottom of the order. That's not a real surprise but it's fun to see.

                I guess what surprised me was that the NL doesn't seem to use much speed in the 8 spot. Their players have to be just as fast as the AL yet but they must rely on the old strategy of the pitchers sacrificing runners over.

                EDIT: Thanks again!
                ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MyDogSparty View Post
                  Is there a way to get a rank of what spots in the batting order had the most stolen bases?

                  For example
                  in the AL for the 1970s: 1, 2, 9, 7, 8, 3, 6, 5, 4
                  in the NL for the 1970s: 1, 2, 7, 8, 3, 6, 5, 4, 9

                  Or if not by decade then a cumulative over the history of the game? or from the 1950 to current?
                  Has anyone compiled lists of stolen base leaders for decades which didn't start with a year ending in a 0? Such as 1964-1973 or 1988-1997?
                  Holding a pitcher accountable for how many runs his team scores is like holding the designated hitter accountable for how many runs his team allows.

                  An individual statistic is meaningful only if it is based strictly on what the player does and not on what the other players on his team do.

                  Contrary to what most baseball fans claim, a pitched ball which is hit into play is not a strike.

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                  • #10
                    I could run that for you if you gave me which specific decades you wanted.
                    UI2
                    BTB

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JDanger View Post
                      I could run that for you if you gave me which specific decades you wanted.
                      Why not just run all decades and not just the decades which start with a year ending in 0?
                      Holding a pitcher accountable for how many runs his team scores is like holding the designated hitter accountable for how many runs his team allows.

                      An individual statistic is meaningful only if it is based strictly on what the player does and not on what the other players on his team do.

                      Contrary to what most baseball fans claim, a pitched ball which is hit into play is not a strike.

                      Comment

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