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  • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    Do you have a graphic for Willie Stargell's home run blast completely out of Dodger Stadium in 1969?
    Thought you might like this


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    This gallery has 1 photos.

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    • Originally posted by White Knight View Post

      I think a good many people here are just bitter that Mark McGuire probably used steroids, and was a modern player. People need to get over it. Steroids or not, the reality check is McGuire was a better HR hitter. A lot better in fact.

      Also, old timers love to say how incredibly strong Mantle was in his prime. Do they honestly believe he was stronger than McGwire? I'm willing to bet the ranch and first born that McGwire was far stronger, and could bench a hell of a lot more weight too.

      PS I do not believe that site's "facts' on bit. A 734 foot Mantle homer? Come on now...
      For that matter ,I don't believe anyone every hit one over 540 -550.

      Comment


      • 5a.jpg 2a.jpg 1a.jpg 3a copy.jpg 4a.jpg It is proven by measurement that he hit a ball 530' at Griffith stadium on opening day 1956. Another
        at Sportsman's Park measured by the Yankee's staff that struck a house at 2d story level 508' from home plate.
        Another at Briggs Stadium in 1958 that struck a building across the street 471' from home plate at 2d story level.
        According to witness and weather reports it was hit against a very strong wind, 14-27 mph. with no wind it would have traveled
        535-540 feet. Another at Shibe Park, landing on the roof of a row house located at the corner of 20th street and Somerset; the
        nearest corner of that house to home plate measures 507 feet. the house is 22 feet high near the back, 22 feet 6 inches high at the front.
        In the old TV show Home Run Derby, vs. Jackie Jensen, he hit a ball over a house across the street. It measures 490' to the back end of
        that house from Wrigley home plate. In 1961 in the 2d series of the year vs. the Angels, Mantle duplicated that "over the light tower" homer.
        In 1956 at Al Lang Field Mickey hit what may be his longest ever either in BP or the Game vs. the Cardinals. It is now referred to
        as "The Fountain of Youth Home Run" landing near the in the park. It was pinpointed by a witness who was a ball shagger with another
        ball shagger on a map of the park. Bobby Richardson stated they measured the home
        run at 590 feet but that was the distance to the fountain itself. He hit many other long ones. That landing location was 572' feet from home plate. Bobby Richardson stated they measured the home

        The Detroit homer, hit in the 3d inning actually struck the Cab building 474' from home plate, many feet into foul ground after it passed over the roof. Air time was 2:25 pm
        Last edited by elmer; 11-05-2020, 02:25 PM.

        Comment


        • [QUOTE=elmer;n3593156]It is proven by measurement that he hit a ball 530' at Griffith stadium on opening day 1956. Another
          at Sportsman's Park measured by the Yankee's staff that struck a house at 2d story level 508' from home plate.
          Another at Briggs Stadium in 1958 that struck a building across the street 471' from home plate at 2d story level.
          According to witness and weather reports it was hit against a very strong wind, 14-27 mph. with no wind it would have traveled
          535-540 feet. Another at Shibe Park, landing on the roof of a row house located at the corner of 20th street and Somerset; the
          nearest corner of that house to home plate measures 507 feet. the house is 22 feet high near the back, 22 feet 6 inches high at the front.
          In the old TV show Home Run Derby, vs. Jackie Jensen, he hit a ball over a house across the street. It measures 490' to the back end of
          that house from Wrigley home plate. In 1961 in the 2d series of the year vs. the Angels, Mantle duplicated that "over the light tower" homer.
          In 1956 at Al Lang Field Mickey hit what may be his longest ever either in BP or the Game vs. the Cardinals. It is now referred to
          as "The Fountain of Youth Home Run" landing near the in the park. It was pinpointed by a witness who was a ball shagger with another
          ball shagger on a map of the park. That landing location was 572' feet from home plate. Bobby Richardson stated they measured the home
          run at 590 feet but that was the distance to the fountain itself. He hit many other long ones.




          Given Mantle's history, I have no problem with the home run distance's you have mentioned ,except the 590 footer and the one hit against a 14-27 mph wind. I have never seen anyone hit anything near 590 feet , and physics like, Robert K Adair ,say that it is humanly impossible.
          Last edited by carsdaddy; 11-05-2020, 12:37 PM.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by elmer View Post
            5a.jpg 2a.jpg 1a.jpg 3a copy.jpg 4a.jpg It is proven by measurement that he hit a ball 530' at Griffith stadium on opening day 1956. Another
            at Sportsman's Park measured by the Yankee's staff that struck a house at 2d story level 508' from home plate.
            Another at Briggs Stadium in 1958 that struck a building across the street 471' from home plate at 2d story level.
            According to witness and weather reports it was hit against a very strong wind, 14-27 mph. with no wind it would have traveled
            535-540 feet. Another at Shibe Park, landing on the roof of a row house located at the corner of 20th street and Somerset; the
            nearest corner of that house to home plate measures 507 feet. the house is 22 feet high near the back, 22 feet 6 inches high at the front.
            In the old TV show Home Run Derby, vs. Jackie Jensen, he hit a ball over a house across the street. It measures 490' to the back end of
            that house from Wrigley home plate. In 1961 in the 2d series of the year vs. the Angels, Mantle duplicated that "over the light tower" homer.
            In 1956 at Al Lang Field Mickey hit what may be his longest ever either in BP or the Game vs. the Cardinals. It is now referred to
            as "The Fountain of Youth Home Run" landing near the in the park. It was pinpointed by a witness who was a ball shagger with another
            ball shagger on a map of the park. Bobby Richardson stated they measured the home
            run at 590 feet but that was the distance to the fountain itself. He hit many other long ones. That landing location was 572' feet from home plate. Bobby Richardson stated they measured the home

            The Detroit homer, hit in the 3d inning actually struck the Cab building 474' from home plate, many feet into foul ground after it passed over the roof. Air time was 2:25 pm
            This diagram shows, as the one that you provided , that Mantle hit the ball into a cross wind, that is not the same as hitting the ball into a on coming wind. It will reduce the distance the ball would have traveled other wise. Hell on a shot.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • I would disagree with the assessment of the home run being hit against a crosswind mentioned in post 185. It went over the roof very near the foul line
              The image of Briggs/Tiger Stadium is shown in its correct orientation.
              b.jpg
              Last edited by elmer; 11-10-2020, 09:38 AM.

              Comment


              • I agree that the park orientation is correct, so I drew a cross where I believe the ball to be, based on the information I sent you. Given the deviating line you drew ,I take it you disagree ?
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • Wind was constant from the east north east all during the game, directly against the home run. Not a crosswind.

                  minimally, the homer hit against a 14 mph wind. excepting one reading at 2:55 pm the wind was strong the entire afternoon.
                  Turley had allowed the Tigers 2 runs in the 2d. 6 bases on balls in 7 2/3 innings. The game started at 2:30, lasted 2:31min.
                  Mantle hit the ball in the 3d inning, 2d at bat about an hour 10 - 15min. into the game. - perhaps around 3:30 - 3:50pm. 10-15 minutes before
                  the reading of 15-23 mph was taken.





                  dd.jpg




                  Last edited by elmer; 11-10-2020, 05:18 PM.

                  Comment


                  • I've looked over the information, and have researched information on baseball's hit directly into a wind of that magnitude ,and all of the creditable source I've looked at say that a man can't generate the power need to hit a baseball 500 feet against a 14 - 27 mph wind. I do believe he hit the building ,he has hit confirmed 500 footer's before, but on this occasion either the wind had momentarily calmed down or either a cross wind. I fully believe that the physicist, who wrote the book's that provided me with the information know
                    what they are talking about.

                    Comment


                    • The wind giveth and the wind taketh away! No more so than at Wrigley Field. When Kingman lofted that huge home run at Wrigley in 1979, he had a strong wind behind him. On the other hand, when Holtzman pitch his first no-hitter in 1969, the wind was blowing in strongly. In one of the later innings, Aaron drilled one high and deep to left field. The radio and TV announcers both thought it was gone. But not the left fielder. Billy Williams had his eye on it the whole way, and I think just had to jump a little bit to catch it up against the ivy. The wind had smacked it down. As for that Mantle shot in Detroit, if the wind was from the east-northeast, the question would be what was the original angle of the ball's flight as it left the bat. It could have been considerably more toward right-center but was obviously pushed by the wind and landed "foul" after it cleared the roof. You never know about the wind. One time in 1977 or so, I was at Wrigley on a day when the wind was blowing in from left, and the pitchers were dominating; but little Jose Cardenal, of all people, hit a homer to left that just barely cleared the screen behind the bleacher catwalk. All the way onto Waveland Avenue, or at least the sidewalk. Impressive against the wind, but the total flight distance was probably only about 370 feet.
                      Last edited by MrCubFan; 11-19-2020, 05:15 PM.
                      "Thank you very much, Commissioner, for the fine introduction. We've got the setting: sunshine, fresh air; we've got the team behind us. So... let's play two! - Ernie Banks, Aug 8, 1977"

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by carsdaddy View Post
                        I do believe he hit the building ,he has hit confirmed 500 footer's before, but on this occasion either the wind had momentarily calmed down or either a cross wind. I fully believe that the physicist, who wrote the book's that provided me with the information know
                        what they are talking about.
                        Steve Boros was there. There is no crosswind showing on any wind chart during the ballgame.

                        Babe Ruth had a 538 foot home run actually measured and another at 551 feet 8 inches. When he hit the 538 footer, there was a light rain and the ballpark faced the water in the direction the ball traveled. Home Runs longer than 507 feet are not the sole purview Babe Ruth. Mantle hit two houses that were exactly 508' from home plate, one home run hit the house 12 feet above ground the other landed on the roof of the house 22 feet above the ground. If the latter struck the nearest corner to home plate, it traveled another 13 feet. Dick Allen and Jimmie Foxx hit this same house.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by carsdaddy View Post
                          I've looked over the information, and have researched information on baseball's hit directly into a wind of that magnitude ,and all of the creditable source I've looked at say that a man can't generate the power need to hit a baseball 500 feet against a 14 - 27 mph wind. I do believe he hit the building ,he has hit confirmed 500 footer's before, but on this occasion either the wind had momentarily calmed down or either a cross wind. I fully believe that the physicist, who wrote the book's that provided me with the information know
                          what they are talking about.
                          Steve Boros was a witness and stated to me and independently - the wind was 'stopping' the ball'

                          Comment


                          • Am I missing something? Where did Sultan's "Progressing Towards Better Stats" thread go?
                            1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

                            1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

                            1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


                            The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
                            The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

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                            • Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
                              Am I missing something? Where did Sultan's "Progressing Towards Better Stats" thread go?
                              I looked for it and didn't find it either.
                              "Cut off my wrists, and 'Park Chan-Ho, 20 wins!'"
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                              • Aug. 27, 1930 article appeared in several newspapers.

                                j.jpg
                                Last edited by elmer; 02-14-2021, 06:07 AM.

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