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  • Either they happen to be better hitters, or the platoon edge for lefties is a pretty big deal

    Here's a couple more righties for ya, with a bonus OBP chart

    Interesting the league OBP. Makes sense. Smaller fields create a home run approach, more K's, AND less room for hits to drop in.


    Frank pretty much hammers Hank when you add those or whatever the process is. Actually can you explain that?
    Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 05-24-2014, 01:58 PM.
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

    Comment


    • Question: Are you simply going by the 5 highest slugging averages OR the 5 highest slugging averages after adjusting to league? For example, Would a .501 SA in 1960 be picked over a .500 SA in 1967, or would the higher relative SA (.500 in '67) be picked?

      Comment


      • Originally posted by layson27 View Post
        Question: Are you simply going by the 5 highest slugging averages OR the 5 highest slugging averages after adjusting to league? For example, Would a .501 SA in 1960 be picked over a .500 SA in 1967, or would the higher relative SA (.500 in '67) be picked?
        I am simply sorting their career by highest SA and the numbers play out from there. It puts their raw numbers, the ones that play a huge part in their actual SA, into perspective.

        The next best thing is just looking at overall career relative SA cause every year gets consideration.

        I bet if u took the time to find the five highest relative seasons, more times than not, probably 4 out of the 5 would be the same years as what I'm doing.

        The reason being, within a players career, except for rare occasions, the league SA doesnt fluctuate much.
        Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 05-24-2014, 01:00 PM.
        "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

        ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
          I am simply sorting their career by highest SA and the numbers play out from there. It puts their raw numbers, the ones that play a huge part in their actual SA, into perspective.

          The next best thing is just looking at overall career relative SA cause every year gets consideration.

          I bet if u took the time to find the five highest relative seasons, more times than not, probably 4 out of the 5 would be the same years as what I'm doing.
          I'm planning on doing DiMaggio's & Williams' ten best years. Probably will use 1949 for Joe D even though it was an injury shortened season. He had 329 PA's in 76 games that year and slugged .596. Any opinion on whether to disregard that season and use another year? It was just slightly less than half a season of games (154), but more than half of his avg. PA's per year. (590) Trying to be fair.
          Last edited by layson27; 05-24-2014, 01:20 PM.

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          • I was thinking 300 was fair but could be wrong.

            Are u looking at top 10 relative or highest SA?

            If you didnt already download the excel file with every years league SA lemme know and I'll post again.
            Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 05-24-2014, 01:51 PM.
            "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

            ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post

              Are u looking at top 10 relative or highest SA?

              If you didnt already download the excel file with every years league SA lemme know and I'll post again.
              I'm looking at raw top ten, but wouldn't be surprised if they were highest relative SA's as well.

              Don't have excel, But I keep BBRef's yearly averages chart handy.

              edit: just found out that DiMag slugged much better at home than on the road in 1938, tempted to substitute 1946 BUT I will stick with highest raw avg, because going through Williams' career to find 10 highest relative SLG is too much of a chore.
              Last edited by layson27; 05-24-2014, 03:35 PM.

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              • Yes...stick to it. By the way, YS changed dramatically in 1938 in left field. Check clems stadium list.

                Did his home HR improve that year too?
                "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                Comment


                • So if you take relative slugging plus relative OB% minus 1 you get OPS+

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                    Thanks m8.

                    My cool graphic design, or the numbers? :atthepc

                    Think I'm gonna do Musial vs Thome next.
                    The numbers. I certainly noticed the tinted pictures though. They make the cluttered effect you get with all the numbers on a spreadsheet dissipate completely. A very nice touch.

                    Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
                    In Modern English, Musial was really, really, really good. To see that he crushed Thome like that stopped my world ...
                    Not sure if you were joking or not but I was shocked he beat him so handily too. Interesting that in Musial's career he hit more HR: +29 and doubles: +61 at home than on the road but in his five best seasons he was way better on the road (except '51). Can someone help me out here: did they change the dimensions at Sportsman's Park during Musial's tenure?
                    Last edited by bluesky5; 04-02-2019, 10:33 AM.
                    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                      Musial vs Thome- best five

                      Sorry Sir Stanley. Hast thou knew your triumphs. Art thou shall have known thy better.

                      LOL is their a shakespearian translator online? Methinks I was making no sense.
                      Not bad for a man who never tried to hit home runs, just to hit the ball hard every time up (the home runs would come). The Man could cream the ball to all fields, slashing line drives that could kill anyone not paying attention. I find it hard to believe that some people don't know how great he really was, and I hope that your hard work here will help to spread the word! Good job!
                      "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                        The numbers. I certainly noticed the tinted pictures though. They make the cluttered effect you get with all the numbers on a spreadsheet dissipate completely. A very nice touch. :applaud:

                        Not sure if you were joking or not but I was shocked he beat him so handily too.

                        Interesting that in Musial's career he hit more HR: +29 and doubles: +61 at home than on the road but in his five best seasons he was way better on the road [except '51]. Can someone help me out here: did they change the dimensions at Sportsman's Park during Musial's tenure?
                        I also really like the pictures. It really brings the numbers to life, rather than just a boring list of dry stats, we get to see the man who created the numbers. Nice!

                        I am shocked that you would expect Thome and Musial to be close at all. And as far as why he would have been inconsistent in his home/road home run splits, I don't think it matters so much where he was hitting them. If he had learned to be a dead pull hitter, as Roger Maris was instructed to switch to when he got to Yankee Stadium, Musial may have hit 600+ home runs with that short RF porch at Sportsman's Park. However, Stan loved hitting the ball to left, but would take it to any field. He also said he never tried to hit home runs, because it messed with his swing. He knew if he hit the ball hard, it would go out at times. He mainly hit scorching line drives to all fields, especially left field, even though on baseball-reference it shows he hit more out to RF (of those that they know of) which would lead to more home-field homers with that short porch.

                        During his early years, he said he was only trying to hit for contact, and wasn't really shooting for power. That came along as he built his confidence throughout the 1940s. The NL also started hitting a lot more home runs at the end of the 1940s than they did at the beginning, or so I read in the big Cardinals history book I have. Musial was certainly right in the thick of that, going from a guy who would hit 10+ homers to 30+ by the end of the decade. He hammered the ball in any park he would play at, so I don't think it would be strange for him to have a higher road total during his best power seasons. Especially with all that room out in LF-L/CF in Sportsman's for him to rip liners into during that time, too.

                        I am probably doing more rambling rather than answering your question. My bad, it has been a long and boring rainy day here. I am itching to ride my Triumph, but roads are flooding over right now...
                        "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Herr28 View Post
                          I also really like the pictures. It really brings the numbers to life, rather than just a boring list of dry stats, we get to see the man who created the numbers. Nice!

                          I am shocked that you would expect Thome and Musial to be close at all. And as far as why he would have been inconsistent in his home/road home run splits, I don't think it matters so much where he was hitting them. If he had learned to be a dead pull hitter, as Roger Maris was instructed to switch to when he got to Yankee Stadium, Musial may have hit 600+ home runs with that short RF porch at Sportsman's Park. However, Stan loved hitting the ball to left, but would take it to any field. He also said he never tried to hit home runs, because it messed with his swing. He knew if he hit the ball hard, it would go out at times. He mainly hit scorching line drives to all fields, especially left field, even though on baseball-reference it shows he hit more out to RF (of those that they know of) which would lead to more home-field homers with that short porch.

                          During his early years, he said he was only trying to hit for contact, and wasn't really shooting for power. That came along as he built his confidence throughout the 1940s. The NL also started hitting a lot more home runs at the end of the 1940s than they did at the beginning, or so I read in the big Cardinals history book I have. Musial was certainly right in the thick of that, going from a guy who would hit 10+ homers to 30+ by the end of the decade. He hammered the ball in any park he would play at, so I don't think it would be strange for him to have a higher road total during his best power seasons. Especially with all that room out in LF-L/CF in Sportsman's for him to rip liners into during that time, too.

                          I am probably doing more rambling rather than answering your question. My bad, it has been a long and boring rainy day here. I am itching to ride my Triumph, but roads are flooding over right now...
                          He did hit 600+ HR's. I though the 600 would get him closer than that to Stan The Man.
                          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by layson27 View Post
                            Thanks!

                            And of course it's no big surprise how close they are here. Both are ahead of Mantle, and that is a little surprising.
                            Mantle has the big edge in OPS+ because his on base percentages are much higher. I didn't realize though that Mantle's slugging on the road was a good step down from at home.

                            Also regarding Aaron and Mays, Aaron may have been helped in his top 5 seasons but not much overall.

                            Comment


                            • Mr Edgar Martinez.............

                              "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                              ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                              Comment


                              • Thank you Blue, that means a lot. Just do what I can. I'm an infant when it comes to stats but decent with creative graphic design. Try to make it different and pleasant for the viewer.

                                I gotta say..the reason for my Shakespearian post about Musial vs Thome...I seriously expected it to be closer for whatever reason....and then when the results came out, I felt rather embarrassed and ashamed that I didn't give Musial proper respect.
                                "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                                ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                                Comment

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