Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1971 Miami Orioles

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1971 Miami Orioles

    My name is Ed Blake, Jr. and I was a pitcher for the Miami Orioles on the 1971 team that won the Florida State League Championship. My record was 10 wins and 5 losses and I led the league that year in earned run average. The following 2 years I played for the Asheville Orioles, which was the AA affiliate for the Baltimore Orioles in the Southern League. Cal Ripkin, Sr. was the manager and his sons, Cal, Jr. and Billy, were the batboys.

    Woody Smith was the manager of the 1971 Baby Os. John McCall was the trainer. Sonny Hirsch was the play-by-play announcer and the team statistician. Red Morcroft was the owner. The minor league pitching coach that year was Hermann Sterrett.

    Woody Smith was a fine person and an excellent manager. His sons, Reggie and "Harpo" were the batboys.

    Other players I recall on the 1971 Baby Os included Don Collins, Bo McCaughnney, Jim Fuller, Oscar Del Busto, Gordon Johnston, Victor Agusto, Rubin Castillo, Herb Hutson, Bill Woods, Dick David, Lenny Scott, Rich Richardson, Pat Renfro, Chico Del Orbe, Arlyn Hines, Conrad Herman, and Jim West.

    Other teams in the league that year included the Ft. Lauderdale Yankees, West Palm Beach Expos, Pompano Mets, Tampa Reds, St. Petersburg Cardinals, Daytona Beach Dodgers, Winterhaven Red Sox and Lakeland Tigers.

    During the course of the season at Miami Stadium, there was Dizzy Dean, Bob Feller, Don Shula, Mickey Mantle, Max Patkin and Harry Dalton.

    I recall residing at the Shalimar Motel located on Biscayne Blvd. in Miami, swimming in the ocean at Miami Beach, eating at Wolfies Delicatessen on Collins Avenue in Miami Beach, visiting the Castaways nightclub in Miami Beach, etc.

    My father, Ed Blake, Sr., played professional baseball for seventeen (17) years, including playing against Woody Smith, when my father played for Rochester Redwings in the International League, and Woody Smith was playing for the Miami Marlins. I still recall Woody telling me, now thirty-seven (37) years ago, that my dad was really a tough pitcher when the chips were down.

    When I read Reggie's comments about his dad, it was as though we were back on the bus traveling to and from another game in the Florida State League that year.

    For the last thirty (30) years, I have been an attorney in private practice in Belleville, Illinois, which is across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri. Our law firm is Blake & Allen, P.C. and our website is www.BlakeandAllen.com.

    I hope I have made a contribution to this website and look forward to revisiting same from time to time.

  • #2
    Dang, if this only went back seven more years

    http://www.thebaseballcube.com/leagues/1978/FSL.shtml

    Add your post to the minor league section if you haven't
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

    Comment


    • #3
      Enjoy!

      http://minors.sabrwebs.com/cgi-bin/p...D=blake-002edw
      "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
      -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

      Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Ed,
        Welcome to the site and thanks for all the great information!

        Unfortunately, I almost don't want to tell you this, but according to the records I have, you didn't in fact lead the league in ERA in '71. From the information that I was able to locate, your teammate that season, Herbie Hutson lead the league in both ERA (1.65) and wins (17).

        That was one heck of a ball-club you played for, though, Donnie Collins led the league in batting average, while Jim Fuller led in runs, hits, RBI, and HR. Your 10-5 record that year with a 1.77 ERA and 116 strikeouts was pretty impressive though and I'm sure contributed greatly to the Championship.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Eblake View Post
          My name is Ed Blake, Jr. and I was a pitcher for the Miami Orioles on the 1971 team that won the Florida State League Championship. My record was 10 wins and 5 losses and I led the league that year in earned run average. The following 2 years I played for the Asheville Orioles, which was the AA affiliate for the Baltimore Orioles in the Southern League. Cal Ripkin, Sr. was the manager and his sons, Cal, Jr. and Billy, were the batboys.

          Woody Smith was the manager of the 1971 Baby Os. John McCall was the trainer. Sonny Hirsch was the play-by-play announcer and the team statistician. Red Morcroft was the owner. The minor league pitching coach that year was Hermann Sterrett.

          Woody Smith was a fine person and an excellent manager. His sons, Reggie and "Harpo" were the batboys.

          Other players I recall on the 1971 Baby Os included Don Collins, Bo McCaughnney, Jim Fuller, Oscar Del Busto, Gordon Johnston, Victor Agusto, Rubin Castillo, Herb Hutson, Bill Woods, Dick David, Lenny Scott, Rich Richardson, Pat Renfro, Chico Del Orbe, Arlyn Hines, Conrad Herman, and Jim West.

          Other teams in the league that year included the Ft. Lauderdale Yankees, West Palm Beach Expos, Pompano Mets, Tampa Reds, St. Petersburg Cardinals, Daytona Beach Dodgers, Winterhaven Red Sox and Lakeland Tigers.

          During the course of the season at Miami Stadium, there was Dizzy Dean, Bob Feller, Don Shula, Mickey Mantle, Max Patkin and Harry Dalton.

          I recall residing at the Shalimar Motel located on Biscayne Blvd. in Miami, swimming in the ocean at Miami Beach, eating at Wolfies Delicatessen on Collins Avenue in Miami Beach, visiting the Castaways nightclub in Miami Beach, etc.

          My father, Ed Blake, Sr., played professional baseball for seventeen (17) years, including playing against Woody Smith, when my father played for Rochester Redwings in the International League, and Woody Smith was playing for the Miami Marlins. I still recall Woody telling me, now thirty-seven (37) years ago, that my dad was really a tough pitcher when the chips were down.

          When I read Reggie's comments about his dad, it was as though we were back on the bus traveling to and from another game in the Florida State League that year.

          For the last thirty (30) years, I have been an attorney in private practice in Belleville, Illinois, which is across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri. Our law firm is Blake & Allen, P.C. and our website is www.BlakeandAllen.com.

          I hope I have made a contribution to this website and look forward to revisiting same from time to time.

          Ed Blake, Jr.,

          Thanks so very much for sharing all those great memories from your days at Miami Stadium. I too have some wonderful memories from Miami Stadium, mine were a little bit after yours, 1974-1980 serving as ticket manager.

          You included Sonny Hirsch in your article, he was the general manager when I was there, and I'll never forget him. Sonny passed away in 1999 just as he was preparing to return to the Miami Hurricanes as play-by-play man.

          Sonny was a lifer in South Florida sports, beginning as a bat boy for the locals in the Florida International League, to college sports at UM, television with channels 7 & 10, and talk radio, all the while advancing through the ranks with the Orioles and Marlins.

          Sonny Hirsch probably helped me and my limited baseball career more than anyone else, for seven seasons I saw him and worked with him almost everyday during the baseball season, I'll always remember and treasure those days at Miami Stadium.

          Last edited by sunsox; 06-28-2017, 09:10 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sonny.jpg Sonny Hirsch in front of Miami Stadium

            Comment


            • #7
              This was Sonny Hirsch's dog Shagger, he had the run of the ballpark, after all his owner was the general manager of the ball club.
              You do not have permission to view this gallery.
              This gallery has 1 photos.
              Last edited by sunsox; 07-05-2017, 01:49 PM.

              Comment

              Ad Widget

              Collapse
              Working...
              X