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  • #91
    Originally posted by blackout805
    Gibson would've been the first catcher to ever slug .700 before
    Seems like a pretty safe prediction. How slow was he? Much of his SA would have had to come from running out doubles and triples regularly. Could he have stretched it?

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    • #92
      Originally posted by blackout805
      Gibson would've been the first catcher to ever slug .700 before
      I'm not so sure. Even Piazza never really got close to slugging .700. And I don't see Gibson being any better than Pizza as a hitter.
      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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      • #93
        Gibson could have definitely gotten lots of doubles, but he would have to have some real good luck and friendly scorekeeping (fielders misplaying the ball) to get a triple.

        Gibson was probably very similar to Jimmie Foxx as a hitter, but he probably wouldn't have posted numbers quite like Foxx's because of the wear and tear catching gave to the body.

        Piazza's 1997 is a real tough standard, but I could see Gibson matching it in his best seasons and his normal season being more like Piazza's 1995 and 1996. It also has to be remembered with the catching equipment of the time it would be hard for Gibson to play 125+ games consistently, which may be a positive in his quest for a .700 slugging season.

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        • #94
          Originally posted by 538280
          Gibson could have definitely gotten lots of doubles, but he would have to have some real good luck and friendly scorekeeping (fielders misplaying the ball) to get a triple.
          I love when people don't bother checking the statistical record before downplaying Josh's skills, but Gibson was a pretty darned good triples hitter, just like Foxx and Ruth (players with similar speed and strength). In 1932, he was second in the East-West League in triples, trailing only Oscar Charleston. In '33, he was second in the Negro National League in triples, behind Charleston. He tied for third in the NNL in 1934. In 1937, he tied Wild Bill Wright for the NNL triple lead. He also tied for the Dominican League lead in triples that year. In 1938, he was part of a five-way tie for the NNL triple lead. In 1939, he tied for third in the NNL. In bad physical shape at age 32, he still was tied for 5th in the NNL in triples in 1943 and then led the league in 1944 with 12, five more than anyone else. In 1945, he was still third in the NNL, only two off of the lead. In his last season, terribly out of condition and 35 years old, he tied for second in the league - only Larry Doby beat him, by 2. So we have three league leaderships in triples, counting only US-based leagues, another three times as the runner-up and another two times in the top 3. So we have 8 top-3 finishes in his 16 seasons. I think that shows that Gibson was an excellent triples hitter. Next time, will people please view the record before either blasting or lauding Gibson inappropriately.

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