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Fastest Fastball?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Themescules
    Nolan Ryan's Fastball was clocked at 100.9 MPH not 101.9, as a matter of fact if you look at the link The Commissioner gave it will say 100.9, I remembered when RYAN did it.

    Yesterday July 24th, 2002 I was watching ESPN and they showed a ball that Guillermo Mota of the Dodgers threw to Ron Gant and Gant got a hold of it and smacked a two-run homer in the 7th inning for the Padres. Espn froze the scene and the pitch gun showed the pitch to be 101 MPH, that's the fastest I've scene and you can contact ESPN about it, it was pretty cool to see a pitch that fast and more amazingly Gant smashing it into the seats.

    Themescules
    I was at the game when Ryan was given the official recognition for his 100.9 pitch later on that year at Anaheim Stadium. He was given a "Speed Checked by Radar" highway sign with four balls attached to it. The had the mic out and did the presentaion.

    I remember Dick Emberg talking about it that his fasted pitch was in the 8th or 9th inning. To me, all the memeries of Ryan inclue Dick Emberg, especially his 383 strikeout in the 12th inning against Minnesota's Rich Reese.
    http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

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    • #32
      Check this out

      Did anyone know that the fast fastball was thrown by a softball player?
      http://www.kingandhiscourt.com/index_home.html

      Check it Out

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      • #33
        Nolan Ryan I think throw the fastest in a game but people threw faster in spring traning games.
        2007 World Series Prediction Chicago Cubs Win against Detroit Tigers

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        • #34
          Don't know how old this thread actually is but I used to watch Billy Koch clocked at between 99 and 101 mph on a regular basis, and twice at 102mph. Assuming the Radar Gun is off by 1 MPH either way that would make it either 101MPH or 103MPH. I would say 'officially' it has to be Nolan Ryan at 100.9 MPH. What I would really like to see is an official competition similar to a home run derby, possibly during the all star break?

          Anyways, here's some referance material on the subject:

          Nolan Ryan 'official' Record:
          http://www.baseball-almanac.com/recbooks/rb_guin.shtml

          Billy Koch Pitches 102 MPH @ Oakland:
          http://www.baseball-almanac.com/recbooks/rb_guin.shtml

          List of Observed Fastballs, Speed Converter, & Misc Info on Fast Pitchers in MLB:
          http://www.baseball-almanac.com/arti...baseball.shtml

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          • #35
            Steve Dalkowski was a wicked fast pitcher.

            Had absoultly no control however. In his 995 inning career he walked 1354 batters while striking out 1396 batters. If he had control he would have been great. Here is the part about him in Baseball Almanac.


            Steve Dalkowski.

            “To understand how Dalkowski, a chunky little man with thick glasses and a perpetually dazed expression, became a ‘legend in his own time’...”

            — Pat Jordan in The Suitors of Spring (1974).

            The fastest pitcher ever may have been 1950s phenom and flameout Steve Dalkowski. Dalkowski signed with the Orioles in 1957 at age 21. After nine years of erratic pitching he was released in 1966, never having made it to the Major Leagues. Despite his failure, he has been described as the fastest pitcher ever.

            Ted Williams once stood in a spring training batting cage and took one pitch from Dalkowski. Williams swore he never saw the ball and claimed that Dalkowski probably was the fastest pitcher who ever lived. Others who claimed he was the fastest ever were Paul Richards, Harry Brecheen and Earl Weaver. They all thought he was faster than Bob Feller and Walter Johnson, though none of them probably saw Johnson pitch.

            In 1958 the Orioles sent Dalkowski to the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, a military installation where Feller was once clocked. Feller was clocked at 98.6 mph. Dalkowski was clocked at only 93.5, but a few mitigating factors existed:

            1) Dalkowski had pitched in a game the day before, so he could be expected to throw 5-10 mph slower than usual;

            2) there was no mound to pitch from, which Feller had enjoyed, and this would drop his velocity by 5-8 mph;

            3) he had to pitch for 40 minutes before the machine could measure his speed, and he was exhausted by the time there was a reading. Other sources reported that the measuring device was a tube and that he took a long time to finally throw one into the tube.

            It was estimated that Dalkowski’s fastball at times reached 105 mph. Dalkowski was not physically imposing, standing only 5'8" and wearing thick glasses. He had legendary wildness, which kept him out of the Major Leagues. In 995 minor league innings, he walked 1,354 batters and struck out 1,396. He walked 21 in one minor league game and struck out 21 in another. In high school he pitched a no-hitter while walking 18 and striking out 18.

            He threw 283 pitches in a complete game against Aberdeen and once threw 120 pitches in only two innings. He played in nine leagues in nine years.

            In 1963 for Elmira he finally started throwing strikes. During spring training in 1964, Dalkowski was with the Major League club. After fielding a sacrifice bunt by pitcher Jim Bouton in spring training, Dalkowski’s arm went dead and he never recovered. He drifted to various jobs and landed in Bakersfield, California, where he was arrested many times for fighting.

            He once threw a ball at least 450 feet on a bet. He was supposed to throw the ball from the outfield wall to home plate, but he threw it well above the plate into the press box. He once threw a pitch so hard that the catcher missed the ball and it shattered an umpire’s mask. Dalkowski was the basis for wild fastball pitcher Nuke LaLoosh in the movie Bull Durham.
            go sox.

            Pigskin-Fever

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            • #36
              Originally posted by TheHawkN02
              Does anyone know who has the fastest recorded pitch in MLB history? If so, please include pitcher and speed of pitch in MPH. My personal guess might be Nolan "Flame Thrower" Ryan, but if aware of one faster, please reply.

              Thanks in advance, "TheHawkN02" out.
              it is Nolan Ryan and it was like 102 MPH
              2007 World Series Prediction Chicago Cubs Win against Detroit Tigers

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              • #37
                I read a quote from Cy Young once concerning Feller that went something like this "I've seen faster. Johnson was faster. Russie was faster. And I was faster than all of them."
                Young's modesty might leave something to be desired. But I had to laugh when I read it and I thought I'd share it with you.
                Of course I don't know if we'll ever know just how fast Johnson, Russie, Young, or others from that time really were.

                Welcome back ARod. Hope you are a Yankee forever.
                Phil Rizzuto-a Yankee forever.

                Holy Cow

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                • #38
                  Their is no way to verify. That's the problem we are all up against. I've read the articles about Dalkowski, Smokey Joe Wood, and Smokey Joe Williams. It's hard to say, without some tangible records, who was the fastest. I'm suprised that no one else has mentioned either of the Smokey Joe's on this thread.

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                  • #39
                    There's absolutely no way to tell, for reasons that have been well enumerated above.

                    But just to throw another name out there, I remember Mark Wohlers being clocked at 104 in a spring training game several years ago, before he...um...stopped being any good.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Jays
                      Don't know how old this thread actually is but I used to watch Billy Koch clocked at between 99 and 101 mph on a regular basis, and twice at 102mph. Assuming the Radar Gun is off by 1 MPH either way that would make it either 101MPH or 103MPH. I would say 'officially' it has to be Nolan Ryan at 100.9 MPH. What I would really like to see is an official competition similar to a home run derby, possibly during the all star break?

                      Anyways, here's some referance material on the subject:

                      Nolan Ryan 'official' Record:
                      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/recbooks/rb_guin.shtml

                      Billy Koch Pitches 102 MPH @ Oakland:
                      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/recbooks/rb_guin.shtml

                      List of Observed Fastballs, Speed Converter, & Misc Info on Fast Pitchers in MLB:
                      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/arti...baseball.shtml

                      Most of those stats given in those links are dated. For example, in the highest attendance for a sporting event in the U.S. has been shattered year after year during the U of Michigan vs. Ohio State football games averaging over 100,000 for the past few years.
                      Grab some pine, MEAT!!!

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                      • #41
                        I think I rememeber Robb Nen clocked 100 but I was just a kid so single pitch seemed that fast

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                        • #42
                          RedSoxVT92 has the article posted above. There is no way to tell though, and there never will be. Nolan Ryan is in Guiness for 100.9, not 101.9. But every year someone comes and throws 100 mph. Detroit has two fireballer rookies who have both hit 101 on the radar gun this year, Verlander and Zumaya. But you can't go by radar guns because they are not 100% accurate, that's why most police departments don't even use them anymore. Mark Wohlers clocked 104 in the late 90's, but we can't be sure how accurate the gun was. Verlander, Zumaya, Koch, Jenks, Gagne, Farnsworth, and a number of others have all been clocked recently at 100 plus, but who knows if Ryan, Feller, Dalkowski, or someone else has thrown faster. I would be willing to put my money on Dalkowski based on the article, I wonder if there is anyone in the majors who could throw a ball more than 450 ft. If he could really throw that far, he had to of been able to throw it pretty damn hard a distance of 60 feet, 6 inches.
                          "The base paths belonged to me, the runner. The rules gave me the right. I always went into a bag full speed, feet first. I had sharp spikes on my shoes. If the baseman stood where he had no business to be and got hurt, that was his fault. -Ty Cobb

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                          • #43
                            Before there were radar guns

                            Originally posted by sfgiants29
                            Most of those stats given in those links are dated. For example, in the highest attendance for a sporting event in the U.S. has been shattered year after year during the U of Michigan vs. Ohio State football games averaging over 100,000 for the past few years.
                            Welcome aboard, sfgiants29! Right you are about ever changing stats, and accuracy of older ones. However, the largest attendance for a single sporting event has been the Indy 500 for decades. There are 250,000+ reserved seats, as well as 100,000+ general admission tickets sold since the new stands were constructed. That is, of course, if you consider the motor sports a sport. I've been to Ann Arbor for the Big Ten's biggest rivalry game, and it is truly awesome to see the throngs of Buckeyes and Wolverines that descend on the town that weekend.

                            But, back to baseball; I'm faily certain there have been dozens of pitchers capable of throwing 100+ mph long before accurate timing devices came into being. It is also logical to extrapolate there were also some mighty strong arms in the field, LF in particular, that could have easily topped three figures in speed. Former Reds nasty boy Randy Myers was clocked at 102 in a relief appearance, but as usual, the gun's accuracy was subject to debate.
                            Baseball is a ballet without music. Drama without words ~Ernie Harwell

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                            • #44
                              According to Baseball Almanac the fastest pitcher ever clocked was by Mark Wohlers at 103mph in a 1995 spring training game.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by sfgiants29
                                Most of those stats given in those links are dated. For example, in the highest attendance for a sporting event in the U.S. has been shattered year after year during the U of Michigan vs. Ohio State football games averaging over 100,000 for the past few years.

                                Yeah I admint that they are pretty dated, but it's pretty much all I could find, not like MLB is giving us much to work with are they? Too bad they can't show up every now and again at a park with a properly calibrated gun and measure everyones official pitch speed off of that. Ahh well, guess there will never really be a way to conclusivly say who is the fastest until MLB starts recording it as an official stat.

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