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  • #76
    Originally posted by billforn
    Back in the 1940s, Bob Feller was clocked by a photo cell device at 107 mph. This device predates radar guns and is considered to be more accurate than radar guns. In fact, from my understanding, to this day the U.S. military still uses the photo cell technology because of its precision.
    That wouldn't suprise me. Satchel Paige claims that Bob Feller is the hardest pitcher he has ever saw and no human can throw harder then him or something like that. And Satchel Paige was measured at 99.6 mph, by feet traveled per second...

    And if the fastest pitch ever is 100.9 by Nolan Ryan, according to wikipedia and Guiness Book of World Records, then they are wrong because Joel Zumaya threw a 103 Mph several times this year.

    and 102 consistently.

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    • #77
      Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
      And if the fastest pitch ever is 100.9 by Nolan Ryan, according to wikipedia and Guiness Book of World Records, then they are wrong because Joel Zumaya threw a 103 Mph several times this year.

      and 102 consistently.
      On non-official radar guns.

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by EvanAparra
        On non-official radar guns.
        So.


        ...

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
          So.


          ...
          So that means it doesn't count.

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
            That wouldn't suprise me. Satchel Paige claims that Bob Feller is the hardest pitcher he has ever saw and no human can throw harder then him or something like that. And Satchel Paige was measured at 99.6 mph, by feet traveled per second...

            And if the fastest pitch ever is 100.9 by Nolan Ryan, according to wikipedia and Guiness Book of World Records, then they are wrong because Joel Zumaya threw a 103 Mph several times this year.

            and 102 consistently.
            Obviously you didn't read the articles I attached links to. Zumaya's 103 mph pitch was timed using a gun that takes the reading as soon as the ball left his hand. Ryan's pitch (100.9) was measured 10 feet from home plate. The FOX pitch tracker showed Zumaya's 103 mph pitch at only 94 mph at home plate.

            I also believe the guns used on TV are "juiced". Just like the mammoth home runs of the steroid era, a pitcher throwing 100+ mph gets the fans excited. I agree 100% with the Joe Kennedy example posted earlier.

            There are only a handful of guys in the majors who can legitimately touch the high 90's. Yet, come playoff time, it seems every team has 4 or 5 pitchers throwing that hard (and yet they still don't get many strikeouts) according to the TV radar guns.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by Ledfut13
              Obviously you didn't read the articles I attached links to. Zumaya's 103 mph pitch was timed using a gun that takes the reading as soon as the ball left his hand. Ryan's pitch (100.9) was measured 10 feet from home plate. The FOX pitch tracker showed Zumaya's 103 mph pitch at only 94 mph at home plate.

              I also believe the guns used on TV are "juiced". Just like the mammoth home runs of the steroid era, a pitcher throwing 100+ mph gets the fans excited. I agree 100% with the Joe Kennedy example posted earlier.

              There are only a handful of guys in the majors who can legitimately touch the high 90's. Yet, come playoff time, it seems every team has 4 or 5 pitchers throwing that hard (and yet they still don't get many strikeouts) according to the TV radar guns.

              Actually, I heard that it doesn't measure it straight out of the hand if measures it about 4 feet away from the hand, because if tried to measure the ball out of their hand it would probably give you the arm speed instead...

              I forget what the two types of Radar guns are called, one is called JUGS and i forgot the other h .

              Also, Even though Zumaya doesn't throw 103 he is still the fastest thrower in the Mlb right now because even though those guns might be "juiced" I still don't see any other pitcher hit 103 on those guns.

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              • #82
                Ive seen many his at least 102 over the last couple years... two being Embree and Wagner.

                Comment


                • #83
                  "Forget the name but Williams said this pitchers arm went dead on a throw to first of all things."

                  That'd be Steve Dalkowski...and that's just one of about half a dozen stories about how he blew it out. (Sometimes it's on a pitch to Hector Lopez, sometimes it's fielding a bunt from Hector Lopez, sometimes it's getting nailed with a liner right back up the middle on the arm by Hector Lopez, sometimes it's all those things with Jim Bouton [who was facing Dalkowski in that Spring Training game], who knows? However, the fact that he had walked Roger Maris for the previous batter would make me think Hector Lopez was the batter he faced...unless the Yankees were really screwing around with their lineup.).
                  "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                  -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                  Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
                    Actually, I heard that it doesn't measure it straight out of the hand if measures it about 4 feet away from the hand, because if tried to measure the ball out of their hand it would probably give you the arm speed instead...

                    I forget what the two types of Radar guns are called, one is called JUGS and i forgot the other h .

                    Also, Even though Zumaya doesn't throw 103 he is still the fastest thrower in the Mlb right now because even though those guns might be "juiced" I still don't see any other pitcher hit 103 on those guns.
                    I think the old gun is called a Ra-Gun, or something like that. You are probably right about the JUGS gun taking a reading about 4 feet away from the hand. It makes sense that you would want the ball speed and not the arm speed. But after the pitcher's stride, release, and an additional 4 feet, the ball is probably still about 50 feet from home plate. That is still quite a bit earlier than where Ryan's pitch was measured (10 feet from home plate). Zumaya's pitch went from 103 mph to just over 94 mph in the time it took the ball to travel from 4 feet after releasing the ball to home plate. That is an 8.5 mph drop. Imagine if Ryan's 101 mph pitch (10 feet from the plate) dropped even 5 or 6 mph from his release point. You are still looking at a mph at release of approximately 106-107 mph.

                    I do agree with you that Zumaya appears to be the hardest throwing of the current pitchers.

                    Like any sport, comparisons across generations are pretty hard to make, but are good for stimulating debate...

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      I'll toss this name into the mix because I haven't seen it mentioned yet. Does anybody remember a pitcher for the Detroit Tigers names Matt Anderson? He was a #1 overall pick out of Rice University and pitched for the Tigers in the late 1990's I believe. I was at a game at old Tiger Stadium when he pitched against the Baltimore Orioles. In that game he topped 100 mph several times. I also seem to remember that ESPN the magazine did an article on flamethrowing pitchers and he was listed as having thrown 104 mph.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Anderson was rated throwing both the JUGS gun and the Ra-Gun (the latter being more accurate since the current version gives a reading 15 feet away from home plate as well as just after the pitcher releases it). He hit 104 on the JUGS, but "only" hit 99 on the Ra-Gun 15 feet away. Rittwage, btw, was measured 15 feet away with regards to his 99+ mph pitch. This immediately cancels out Anderson. Joel Zumaya probably throws around 101 mph tops if one is to use the "Ryan Measurement." Bob Feller, IMO, was the fastest Major Leaguer, although compelling cases can be made for Dick Weik, Harry Fanok, Ryne Duren, Eli Grba, Jim Rittwage, Sudden Sam McDowell, and Nolan Ryan. Steve Dalkowski, IMO, was the fastest professional pitcher.
                        "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                        -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                        Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Good ol' Sidd Finch. This article has the Goose and Ryan at 103, not offical tho.

                          http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/fea...4/finch_flash/

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Didn't the original article Sports Illustrated published actually have the first letter of each word about Sidd Finch spell out "April Fool" (just for the benefit of our younger members...Sidd Finch isn't real. He was an April Fool's Day joke conconcted by SI.)
                            "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                            -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                            Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Dalkowski110
                              Didn't the original article Sports Illustrated published actually have the first letter of each word about Sidd Finch spell out "April Fool" (just for the benefit of our younger members...Sidd Finch isn't real. He was an April Fool's Day joke conconcted by SI.)
                              Yeah it did. Forgot about it.

                              The subhead of the article read: "He's a pitcher, part yogi and part recluse. Impressively liberated from our opulent life-style, Sidd's deciding about yoga —and his future in baseball." The first letters of these words spells out "Happy April Fools Day."

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                i duno if this counts but ive seen japanese pitchers kyuji fujikawa hit around 102-105 with his fastball and hes throwing changeups at like 90 miles an hour :S

                                Comment

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