Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Every team from the 1970s now has a deceased member

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Every team from the 1970s now has a deceased member

    I just found out that former MLB outfielder Leroy Stanton died two days ago. It's always sad when a former player passes, but his death is interesting to me for another reason. Stanton played for the 1978 Mariners, a team that until now had no players reported dead. They were the last team from the 1970s that could make such a claim. 41 years until the first player death might just be a major league record, though I don't have data for every team. I know that no team from the 1940s through 1960s went that long before a player died, and given the shorter lifespans of the past, it's unlikely that any earlier teams did.

    It's always possible some obscure player from the '78 Mariners died previously and it was just never reported, but until we learn otherwise, we need to give them the record.
    Baseball Junk Drawer

  • #2
    Originally posted by ian2813 View Post
    I just found out that former MLB outfielder Leroy Stanton died two days ago. It's always sad when a former player passes, but his death is interesting to me for another reason. Stanton played for the 1978 Mariners, a team that until now had no players reported dead. They were the last team from the 1970s that could make such a claim. 41 years until the first player death might just be a major league record, though I don't have data for every team. I know that no team from the 1940s through 1960s went that long before a player died, and given the shorter lifespans of the past, it's unlikely that any earlier teams did.

    It's always possible some obscure player from the '78 Mariners died previously and it was just never reported, but until we learn otherwise, we need to give them the record.
    That's a weird and obscure piece of information, but at the same time, it's fascinating, considering the fact that there are so many ways a person could die and that luck certainly plays a part in a human being's longevity.
    I do like to check the Wikipedia's list of the 100 oldest living major league players, (The Wikipedia "Main List" from time to time just to see who is still around. (Actually it lists the 125 oldest players, because if you click 'EDIT' at the Top Right of the main page, it will give you another list that reveals #s 1-125, which I call "The Supplementary List" and then you will have the names of 25 more of the most senior living players to conjure with. The Wikipedia list does reveal more info if you know what you are looking for and if you can "read between the lines".
    For example: The only living player from the last World Series-winning Cleveland Indians team of 1948 is first baseman, Eddie Robinson (born 12/15/1920) now 98 years of age. Wally Westlake, who was with the Phillies briefly in 1956, at the end of his 10-year major league career is just about a month away from becoming the oldest living Phillie ever. He's 98 years and 4 months old and he could surpass Al Monchak, an infielder with the 1940 Phillies who was about 98 years and 5 months of age at the time of his passing a few years ago. There are other tidbits you can discover, such as there are only two living 1950 Philadelphia Phillies National League champion players (popularly known as 'The Whiz Kids') and they are RHP Bob Miller, now 92, and due to turn 93 on June 16 and LHP Curt Simmons, 89, due to turn 90 on May 19.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by philliesfiend55 View Post

      That's a weird and obscure piece of information, but at the same time, it's fascinating, considering the fact that there are so many ways a person could die and that luck certainly plays a part in a human being's longevity.
      I do like to check the Wikipedia's list of the 100 oldest living major league players, (The Wikipedia "Main List" from time to time just to see who is still around. (Actually it lists the 125 oldest players, because if you click 'EDIT' at the Top Right of the main page, it will give you another list that reveals #s 1-125, which I call "The Supplementary List" and then you will have the names of 25 more of the most senior living players to conjure with. The Wikipedia list does reveal more info if you know what you are looking for and if you can "read between the lines".
      For example: The only living player from the last World Series-winning Cleveland Indians team of 1948 is first baseman, Eddie Robinson (born 12/15/1920) now 98 years of age. Wally Westlake, who was with the Phillies briefly in 1956, at the end of his 10-year major league career is just about a month away from becoming the oldest living Phillie ever. He's 98 years and 4 months old and he could surpass Al Monchak, an infielder with the 1940 Phillies who was about 98 years and 5 months of age at the time of his passing a few years ago. There are other tidbits you can discover, such as there are only two living 1950 Philadelphia Phillies National League champion players (popularly known as 'The Whiz Kids') and they are RHP Bob Miller, now 92, and due to turn 93 on June 16 and LHP Curt Simmons, 89, due to turn 90 on May 19.
      Yes, I do keep track of stuff like that as well. For example, Milt Welch, the last living member of the 1945 Tigers died last month, making the 1947 Yankees the oldest World Series champion with a living player (that being Bobby Brown).
      Baseball Junk Drawer

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ian2813 View Post

        Yes, I do keep track of stuff like that as well. For example, Milt Welch, the last living member of the 1945 Tigers died last month, making the 1947 Yankees the oldest World Series champion with a living player (that being Bobby Brown).
        Yes I did read about Milt Welch's death recently, but did you know that Welch did not take part in the 1945 World Series and the fact that Welch played in only one major league game in his career? This happened on June 5, 1945.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by philliesfiend55 View Post

          Yes I did read about Milt Welch's death recently, but did you know that Welch did not take part in the 1945 World Series and the fact that Welch played in only one major league game in his career? This happened on June 5, 1945.
          Yep. Very easy to see on his player page.
          Baseball Junk Drawer

          Comment


          • #6
            The current /Wikipedia List cites
            2 living MLB players who are 99 years of age.
            6 living MLB players who are at least 98.
            13 living MLB players who are at least 95.
            75 living MLB players who are at least 90.
            100 living MLB players who are at least 89 and
            125 living MLB players who are at least 88 years of age.
            (Through 3/18/2019).

            Comment

            Ad Widget

            Collapse
            Working...
            X