Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

You Won't Believe This

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • You Won't Believe This

    In 1941 Phillies rookie second baseman, Danny Murtaugh led the National League with 18 Stolen Bases. The runner-up that year was Murtaugh's Phillies teammate, outfielder, Stan Benjamin, who had 17 steals and in third place was the Cincinnati Reds all-star second Baseman, Lonnie Frey, who finished the year with 16 stolen bases.
    It's hard to believe those miniscule totals, but as Casey Stengel always said "You can look it up".
    By the way, the American League was led in Stolen Bases that year by Washington Senators outfielder, George Case, who had a much healthier total of 33 Stolen Bases.

  • #2
    From the 20s until Wills and Aparicio came along in the 60s, the stolen base was deemphasized as an offensive weapon. We probably will never see teams steal 340 bases in a season again.
    27 World Championships
    22 retired numbers
    Isn't it great to be a Yankee fan?
    Baseball was, is, and always will be to me the best sport-Babe Ruth

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dwj21792 View Post
      From the 20s until Wills and Aparicio came along in the 60s, the stolen base was deemphasized as an offensive weapon. We probably will never see teams steal 340 bases in a season again.
      Yes, I have often noted that it was the two players that you cited reached the major leagues, American Leaguer, Aparicio in 1956 and National Leaguer, Wills in 1959 that the game of Baseball was about to undergo something that most of us didn't see coming....a Stolen Bases revolution. The game was about to change and in a very big way. The days of Richie Ashburn, Minnie Minoso and Willie Mays leading the league in Stolen Bases with less than 35 Stolen Bases was over. Wills was particularly devastating in shattering the norm, because by 1962 he'd had a season with over 100 stolen bases. (104 SB in '62). If I sound like I'm campaigning for Maury Wills election to the Hall Of Fame, then perhaps subconsciously I am. Wasn't his contribution to the game more impactful than his contemporaries who are not yet in the Hall Of Fame. Players from the 1950 to 1969 Era that he is thrown in with in Hall of Fame voting such as Richie 'Dick' Allen, Tony Oliva, Jim Kaat , Minnie Minoso, Ken Boyer and Gil Hodges (although I believe Minoso is as deserving as Wills of a place in the Hall Of Fame not only for an outstanding MLB career that was delayed by the racial restrictions of the time that forced Minoso to leave Cuba and come to America not as a major leaguer, but first as a Negro Leagues player. Minoso was impactful because he became the first Latino of Color to become a big star in the big leagues (not Roberto Clemente as some Short-sighted, younger fans tend to think today, who haven't really studied their baseball history thoroughly). Minoso was a racial pioneer who opened the door to the major leagues to Latinos of Color. That said, Wills' impact on major league baseball was immense. You couldn't have a Rickey Henderson or a Lou Brock without first having a Maury Wills.

      Comment

      Ad Widget

      Collapse
      Working...
      X