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Who was the last player to make their MLB Debut in the 20th Century?

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  • Who was the last player to make their MLB Debut in the 20th Century?

    This event occurred on October 3, 1999.

    Take a guess!

  • #2
    Alfonso Soriano? I remember seeing him hit his first major league homer when I was watching baseball highlights at the end of the 1999 season.
    Baseball Junk Drawer

    Comment


    • #3
      1999 is the last year of the 1900s. The last year of the 20th Century is 2000.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Macker View Post
        1999 is the last year of the 1900s. The last year of the 20th Century is 2000.
        Here we go....
        My top 10 players:

        1. Babe Ruth
        2. Barry Bonds
        3. Ty Cobb
        4. Ted Williams
        5. Willie Mays
        6. Alex Rodriguez
        7. Hank Aaron
        8. Honus Wagner
        9. Lou Gehrig
        10. Mickey Mantle

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post

          Here we go....
          Simple fact.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Macker View Post

            Simple fact.
            It's debatable.
            My top 10 players:

            1. Babe Ruth
            2. Barry Bonds
            3. Ty Cobb
            4. Ted Williams
            5. Willie Mays
            6. Alex Rodriguez
            7. Hank Aaron
            8. Honus Wagner
            9. Lou Gehrig
            10. Mickey Mantle

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post

              It's debatable.
              No, it really isn't. There was no year zero. The first century is 1-100. The 20th century is 1901-2000. The year 2000 completes that century, which is why they both start with '20' just as 2100 will complete the 21st century.


              The 1900s are 1900-99. The 20th century is 1901-2000.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Macker View Post

                No, it really isn't. There was no year zero. The first century is 1-100. The 20th century is 1901-2000. The year 2000 completes that century, which is why they both start with '20' just as 2100 will complete the 21st century.


                The 1900s are 1900-99. The 20th century is 1901-2000.
                While this is technically correct most people would consider 1999 to be the last year of the 20th century due to it starting with 19... There are better hills to die on.
                My top 10 players:

                1. Babe Ruth
                2. Barry Bonds
                3. Ty Cobb
                4. Ted Williams
                5. Willie Mays
                6. Alex Rodriguez
                7. Hank Aaron
                8. Honus Wagner
                9. Lou Gehrig
                10. Mickey Mantle

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                  While this is technically correct most people would consider 1999 to be the last year of the 20th century due to it starting with 19...
                  That makes no sense, and I doubt most people believe that to be true.

                  Anyway, the last player to debut in the 20th century was Xavier Nady. Earlier that season, Tarrik Brock became the first player to debut in the 2000s.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Macker View Post
                    1999 is the last year of the 1900s. The last year of the 20th Century is 2000.
                    NOT IN POPULAR OPINION. EVERYBODY CELEBRATED THE NEW YEAR OF DECEMBER 31, 1999/January 1, 2000, NOT MANY PEIPLE CELEBRATED DECEMBER 31, 2000/JANUARY 1, 2001 AS THE END OF THE CENTURY AND AS THE END OF THE MILLENIUM.
                    In addition MLB celebrates 1939-1960 players: Ted Williams, Early Wynn and Mickey Vernon as four decade players. This emphasized the fact that in baseball and in popular opinion decades end in 9s, not in zeros.
                    By the way: There will be no four decade players from the 1990s to the 2020s. The last person who had a shot at becoming a four decade player was Adrian Beltre. Debuting in 1998 he could have played until 2020 to become a four decade player, but he retired after 21 years in the major leagues after the 1998 season.
                    Last edited by 1954 Phils; 10-27-2019, 05:21 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Macker View Post

                      That makes no sense, and I doubt most people believe that to be true.

                      Anyway, the last player to debut in the 20th century was Xavier Nady. Earlier that season, Tarrik Brock became the first player to debut in the 2000s.
                      So the first century A.D is actually only 99 years and it got gypped by one year. So what! Every other century has been observed as ending in a 99.

                      The real answer to my question is: Steve Lomasney, a Boston Red Sox catcher, who debuted in the major leagues on October 3, 1999. It's also noteworthy that that game remains Lomasney's only major league career game.

                      from baseball-reference.com.
                      STEVE LOMASNEY
                      Born: August 29,1977. (current age 42).
                      5th round draft choice of the 1995 amateur draft of the Boston Red Sox.
                      Drafted from Peabody High School, Peabody, MA.
                      mlb debut: October 3, 1999. (age 22)
                      final MLB game: October 3, 1999. (age 22).
                      Games 1. Plate Appearances: 2. At-Bats: 2. Hits 0. Strikeouts 2. Batting Average .000. Slugging Average .000. WAR. 0.1.
                      Last edited by 1954 Phils; 10-27-2019, 05:14 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        NOT IN POPULAR OPINION. EVERYBODY CELEBRATED THE NEW YEAR OF DECEMBER 31, 1999/January 1, 2000, NOT MANY PEIPLE CELEBRATED DECEMBER 31, 2000/JANUARY 1, 2001 AS THE END OF THE CENTURY AND AS THE END OF THE MILLENIUM.
                        No kidding. But they weren't celebrating the end of the 20th century or the end of the 2nd millennium AD. They were celebrating the end of the 1900s and the millennium of the years in the 1000s.

                        So the first century A.D is actually only 99 years and it got gypped by one year.
                        Nope.

                        Every other century has been observed as ending in a 99.
                        But they were celebrating the end of the 1800s, end of the 1900s, etc. That's fine, but they were not celebrating the end of the 19th century, 20th century, etc. A person's third decade of life is ages 21-30, but their 20s are considered ages 20-29.

                        In addition MLB celebrates 1939-1960 players: Ted Williams, Early Wynn and Mickey Vernon as four decade players. This emphasized the fact that in baseball and in popular opinion decades end in 9s, not in zeros.
                        Wrong again. Any point in time is both the end and the beginning of a decade. 1982-1991 is a decade. The National League began in 1876, so someone could define records as the first decade of the NL (1876-1885), second decade of the NL (1886-1995) etc. if they so chose. Wynn, Williams, and Vernon played in four decades. They played in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. That's four decades. They didn't play in the 193rd, 194th, 195th, and 196th decades AD, so in going by decades from the beginning of AD, only Wynn played in four. Also, MLB keeps no official record of 4-decade players, and even if they did, record keepers are free to list records how they want as they did regarding the official ruling of the asterisk for Maris.

                        Lomasney was the last to debut in the 1990s, but he was not the last to debut in the 20th century. Whether public opinion agrees with that is irrelevant. It's a simple fact, and I believe that the majority of people who know how to tell time and read a calendar would understand that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          1-100 - First Century
                          101-200 Second Century
                          ......
                          ......
                          ......
                          1901-2000 Twentieth Century

                          It's not rocket science, guys. You ought to thank Macker for attempting to clear up the confusion. Imagine how ignorant someone who can't tell the time must sound.

                          If you don't believe us, you can look it up.

                          How "popular" the 1999 misconception may be is debatable. What isn't debatable is that it was not, in fact, the final year of the 20th Century.
                          "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                          "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                          "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                          "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
                            1-100 - First Century
                            101-200 Second Century
                            ......
                            ......
                            ......
                            1901-2000 Twentieth Century

                            It's not rocket science, guys. You ought to thank Macker for attempting to clear up the confusion. Imagine how ignorant someone who can't tell the time must sound.

                            If you don't believe us, you can look it up.

                            How "popular" the 1999 misconception may be is debatable. What isn't debatable is that it was not, in fact, the final year of the 20th Century.
                            It's Really Foolish to continue this discussion any longer, but let me get my "last word" in. I suppose your were too young or something to remember the mass celebrations of 12/31/99 and 1/1/00 and how the following year's New Year's celebrations were nowhere near the scale of those of 99/00. Those that argue that 2001 was the first year of the 21st Century are right only in an academic or encyclopedic sense. They are not correct in popular opinion or in the common parlance or in the nearly universal recognition of John Q. Public. In the most widely-held views, the new century and new millennium began on January 1, 2000.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Macker View Post

                              No kidding. But they weren't celebrating the end of the 20th century or the end of the 2nd millennium AD. They were celebrating the end of the 1900s and the millennium of the years in the 1000s.



                              Nope.



                              But they were celebrating the end of the 1800s, end of the 1900s, etc. That's fine, but they were not celebrating the end of the 19th century, 20th century, etc. A person's third decade of life is ages 21-30, but their 20s are considered ages 20-29.



                              Wrong again. Any point in time is both the end and the beginning of a decade. 1982-1991 is a decade. The National League began in 1876, so someone could define records as the first decade of the NL (1876-1885), second decade of the NL (1886-1995) etc. if they so chose. Wynn, Williams, and Vernon played in four decades. They played in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. That's four decades. They didn't play in the 193rd, 194th, 195th, and 196th decades AD, so in going by decades from the beginning of AD, only Wynn played in four. Also, MLB keeps no official record of 4-decade players, and even if they did, record keepers are free to list records how they want as they did regarding the official ruling of the asterisk for Maris.

                              Lomasney was the last to debut in the 1990s, but he was not the last to debut in the 20th century. Whether public opinion agrees with that is irrelevant. It's a simple fact, and I believe that the majority of people who know how to tell time and read a calendar would understand that.

                              CALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL'S OFFICE IN NEW YORK CITY AND THEY WILL TELL YOU THAT THERE SEVERAL FOUR DECADE PLAYERS (7 OR 8) AND THEY ARE:

                              CONTINUOUS SERVICE: NO MORE THAN ONE YEAR MISSING OF MLB SERVICE FOR NON-MILITARY REASONS* AND EXEMPTION FOR YEARS LOST TO MILITARY SERVICE:

                              1906-1930: EDDIE COLLINS (1900s to 1930s).
                              1939-1963: EARLY WYNN (1930s to 1960s).
                              1939-1960: TED WILLIAMS (1930s to 1960s).
                              1939-1960: MICKEY VERNON (1930s to 1960s).
                              1959-1980: WILLIE MCCOVEY (1950s to 1980s).
                              1959-1980: TIM MCCARVER* (1950s to 1980s).
                              1969-1990: JERRY REUSS (1960s to 1990s).

                              And if you recognize non-continuous service:

                              1949; 1951-1964; 1976; 1980: ORESTES SATURNINO 'MINNIE' MINOSO (1940s to 1980s) - 5 DECADE PLAYER.

                              UNDER THE 01-10, 11-20 etc. CONTINUOUS MLB SERVICE DEFINITION ONLY EARLY WYNN WOULD BE DEFINED AS A FOUR DECADE MAN.

                              Comment

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