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Why is a home run called a "four-bagger" when there are only 3 bags on the field?

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  • GiambiJuice
    replied
    Why do we park in a driveway and drive on a parkway?

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  • 9RoyHobbsRF
    replied
    Why is a player called an all-star?

    An all-star game is a game that has ALL the STARS, having all the stars there make it an "all-star" game.

    Why aren't they just called stars?
    Last edited by 9RoyHobbsRF; 09-03-2012, 03:06 PM.

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  • 9RoyHobbsRF
    replied
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post
    I think it was mostly the batters that wanted a new ball put in play. Back in the 80s, batters used to ask the umps to check the ball after a pitch in the dirt. Back then, I think most pitchers want a scuffed/dirty ball.

    But, the question is...why are balls that are hit often used again, while pitches in the dirt are removed right away? The balls that are hit are in worse condition. I think maybe it's because pitchers want to throw these scuffed/dirty balls, and if the batter doesn't request that a new ball put in play, then the pitcher isn't about to give it up.
    I think a pitcher may deliberately throw a ball in the dirt to scuff it and removing a ball thrown in the dirt eliminates that

    Jim Bouton said Elston Howard after receiving the ball would act like he slipped and put his hand with the ball down on the ground in an effort to "balance himself" this would scuff the ball and guys like Whitey Ford would take advantage of it, Bouton was too clueless and he would request a new ball

    A ball hit in play is a fair thing and normal in the course of play

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  • TonyK
    replied
    Maybe the reporter was more than half in the bag when he coined the "four bagger" term?

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  • BiZmaRK
    replied
    Probably for the same reason the pitcher gets a win even when he doesn't win the game.

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  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by Brooklyn View Post
    Im pretty sure it started because pitchers would frequently request a new ball when they threw it in the dirt, presumably because they didn't have a good grip on the old one, and just became a tradition where they do t every time.
    I think it was mostly the batters that wanted a new ball put in play. Back in the 80s, batters used to ask the umps to check the ball after a pitch in the dirt. Back then, I think most pitchers want a scuffed/dirty ball.

    But, the question is...why are balls that are hit often used again, while pitches in the dirt are removed right away? The balls that are hit are in worse condition. I think maybe it's because pitchers want to throw these scuffed/dirty balls, and if the batter doesn't request that a new ball put in play, then the pitcher isn't about to give it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brooklyn
    replied
    Originally posted by LarrySC View Post

    Not a term question, buy whenever a pitchers makes a delivery and it hits the ground they most always put a new ball into play. But if the pitch is hit on the ground they often just keep that same ball in play?
    Originally posted by ipitch View Post


    Yeah, I don't get that either.
    Im pretty sure it started because pitchers would frequently request a new ball when they threw it in the dirt, presumably because they didn't have a good grip on the old one, and just became a tradition where they do t every time.

    Leave a comment:


  • ipitch
    replied
    Originally posted by LarrySC View Post
    I was thinking about baseball terminology the other day, and all of a sudden I got this curious thought about some of the terms in the game. "4 bagger" was one of them.
    A "3-bagger and 1-plater" just doesn't sound as good.

    Also, the part of the field where the batter stands and the catcher crouches behind is commonly called "home plate", but the official rules designate it as "home base".
    It goes by both names in the rulebook.

    Not a term question, buy whenever a pitchers makes a delivery and it hits the ground they most always put a new ball into play. But if the pitch is hit on the ground they often just keep that same ball in play?
    Yeah, I don't get that either.

    Leave a comment:


  • Why is a home run called a "four-bagger" when there are only 3 bags on the field?

    I was thinking about baseball terminology the other day, and all of a sudden I got this curious thought about some of the terms in the game. "4 bagger" was one of them.

    Also, the part of the field where the batter stands and the catcher crouches behind is commonly called "home plate", but the official rules designate it as "home base".

    Why are lefties called "southpaws" but right handed players aren't called "northpaws"?

    Not a term question, buy whenever a pitchers makes a delivery and it hits the ground they most always put a new ball into play. But if the pitch is hit on the ground they often just keep that same ball in play?

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