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Norm Siebern, Jim Fanning and Jose Capellan, former Braves figures, pass away

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  • Norm Siebern, Jim Fanning and Jose Capellan, former Braves figures, pass away

    Norm Siebern, known more as a slugging first baseman in the 1950s and 1960s, was a Braves scout following his playing career.

    American baseball player (Kansas City Athletics
    Died on Friday October 30th 2015
    http://www.dead-people.com/Norm-Siebern

    __________

    Jim Fanning was a Braves scout and executive for a while. He died in April. but his death was not reported in this forum.

    TORONTO (AP) — Jim Fanning, the longtime Montreal Expos executive who managed the franchise to its only playoff appearance in Canada, has died. He was 87.

    The Toronto Blue Jays confirmed Fanning's death Saturday.

    Fanning was the Expos' general manager when the team entered the major leagues in 1968 and spent 25 years with the franchise that moved to Washington in 2005 and became the Nationals.
    Read more:

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports...t-87/26374807/

    _____________

    Jose Capellan pitched for the Braves briefly in 2004. He died in April at the age of only 34.

    Former major league pitcher Jose Capellan died Tuesday from an apparent heart attack at his home in Philadelphia, his wife told ESPNdeportes.com. He was 34.
    Read more:

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/12...t-heart-attack

  • #2
    Cowtipper, it is your responsibility to report deaths in these forums, not ours. We don't go out and search for these things like you do.
    46 wins to match last year's total

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    • #3
      I never even halfway insinuated it was your responsibility to do so.

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      • #4
        Then why the "His death was not reported on this forum" stuff? That's pointless to say.
        46 wins to match last year's total

        Comment


        • #5
          To rationalize me posting about a death that happened six months ago.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well at this point I don't think you have to rationalize it. And I apologize that I inferred that about your posts.
            46 wins to match last year's total

            Comment


            • #7
              No problemo. I never considered that me saying that could be interpreted as an attempt to guilt people.

              Comment


              • #8
                I remember seeing Capellan pitch a few ties in the minors and he was quite impressive. He had a blazing fastball but lacked any secondary pitches that were effective enough to keep major league hitters off of his heater. We traded him to the Brewers for the infamous Dan Kolb whose short tenure as the Braves' closer was an unmitigated disaster when Smoltz moved back into the starting rotation. We would have been better off keeping Capellan, letting him try to develop a better second pitch that winter and had given him a shot at closing that next spring. Don't know if he would have made it or not, but he couldn't have been any worse than Kolb.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Norm Siebern (1933-2015) was a well-above-average player. He made three all-star teams (1962-1964) and drove in 117 runs in 1962 with the KC A's. Also drove in 98 runs the prior season. He wasn't one of the elite power hitters of his day, but hit 25, 19 & 18 home runs in his best seasons. He also hit .300 twice and hit .272 lifetime. Siebern was a Lefty hitting/righthanded throwing first baseman, who also played over 400 games in the outfield in a 1400+ games career. At 6'3" he presented a big target at first for infielders fielding grounders and was considered a good defensive first baseman.He led the league in walks once and didn't strikeout too much (748 Ks lifetime). He fared better away from the glare of the spotlights of Yankee Stadium, where he broke into the majors with the Bronx Bombers (1956-1959), but he made contibutions to the Yankees 1956 & 1958 World Series-winning teams.He really came into his own with the Kansas city Athletics (1960-1963) and the Baltimore Orioles (1964-1965). He remained in the majors through 1968 with stints with the Angels, Giants and Red sox. He was 82.

                  Comment

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