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Success for Cedeno?

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  • Success for Cedeno?

    One of many storylines that we're going to see played out this year is Ronny Cedeno's return to the majors. At the start of spring, it seemed that he would head back down to Iowa to work on his game, however, the way Ronny is approaching the plate this spring and the confidence he has in himself make me think that he could be an important part of the Cubs' quest for a ring.

    In the past week or two, Lou has put Ronny in situations where he had to keep the ball on the right side of the infield to move a runner over, sacrifice bunt to advance runners, and be patient at the plate. For the most part, Ronny's done everything Lou has asked of him, earning himself a spot on the 25.

    In 51 ABs, Cedeno is hitting .314 with a .426 OBP. Most importantly he is walking consistently, leading the team with 10 BB (he had just 17 all of last season, in over 10 times as many at bats). He is striking out at the same pace (10 in spring, 109 last year), but if keeps his walks up, that's a little more bearable.

    Hopefully, without the pressure of being a starter, Cedeno can perform well... if not, we'll be seeing Tomas Perez...
    A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

  • #2
    All Cedeno needed was some good coaching, which is what he's getting this year. He'll be fine.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by otis89
      All Cedeno needed was some good coaching, which is what he's getting this year. He'll be fine.
      Yea, I think it'll be pretty amazing some of the changes we'll see from players' performances last year with Dusty's crew to this year with Lou's team of coaches.
      A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

      Comment


      • #4
        What most fans don't take into consideration is that MLB coaches have VERY LITTLE to do with developing fundamentals in their players. The majority rests upon the players' minor league development with a small minority consisting of what the player learns on the job in the MLB. But for the most part, what a player knows about the game and situations, comes from his exposure level at college and minor league low levels. It's one of the main reasons why drafted players, especially positional players, don't immediately make an impact on the MLB club.

        Cedeno's success now in Spring, shouldn't be a suprise. Not only have the Cubs put him in situations where he's likely to succeed, but he has another season under his belt and more exposure. The scouting line on Cedeno this Spring is similiar to many hitters at this point, "sitting on the fastball, and looks like a fool on breaking balls."

        Of all the minor leaguers we possess, Ronny is the most revered defensive infielder we have. That's been known since his addition to the 40 man roster a few years ago (which puzzled many at the time) and his offseason tear before the 2005 season (earning the Cubs' Spring Training Rookie of the Year aka the Santo Award). Of what was on the roster to start the 2006 season, Cedeno was the best SS choice due to his defensive abilities and the lack there of of Aramis' at 3B. Even with his bat that proved much more anemic than his 2005 (AAA/MLB) numbers flashed and what fans wanted; he put up 2006 stats that most analysts saw fit for his age and development. During the season, Ronny made numerous bone-headed plays, from throwing to the wrong base to not swinging at a hit & run call. But those are all plays upon a then 23 year old Cedeno and not on Dusty Baker and his staff.
        What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
        Line Drive: .356
        HBP: .342
        Non-Intentional Walk: .315
        Intentional Walk: .176
        Outfield Fly: .035
        Groundball: -.101
        Bunts: -.103
        Infield Fly: -.243
        Strikeout: -.287
        It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

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        • #5
          I hope for success with Cedeno. I have liked him, ever since he came up in 2005. He has made me curse a few times, but I have also seen him make some spectacular plays. I wish him all the luck and that maybe in a few years he will be in the starting lineup.
          "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
          -Rogers Hornsby-

          "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
          -Rogers Hornsby-

          Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bob Sacamento
            What most fans don't take into consideration is that MLB coaches have VERY LITTLE to do with developing fundamentals in their players.
            I wasn't necessarily saying that the new coaches will develop their fundamentals, but rather that this group seems to be more involved with trying to coach. I got the sense, and maybe I'm wrong, that previous years' coaching staffs didn't have any positive effects on the players.

            EDIT: I just came across this story.
            Cedeno, whose game has improved dramatically since a long talk with Piniella earlier this spring about his approach at the plate, hit a three-run homer in the bottom of the 10th inning Tuesday to send the Cubs past the Kansas City Royals 13-10.

            "He worked with me on the strike zone," Cedeno said. "Now I try to take more walks and I can see the ball real good. ... It is relaxing for me because they gave me an opportunity and I feel happy for that."

            With Cesar Izturis now the everyday shortstop, Cedeno will get his playing time backing him up and can also play second base.

            Piniella's message to Cedeno was stay on the ball longer, hit it to right-center when possible and take more pitches.

            "The more pitches he sees, the better he is able to clock them," Piniella said.
            Again, maybe I'm forgetting, but I dont remember things like this happening in prior years.
            Last edited by E.Banks#14; 03-28-2007, 12:46 PM.
            A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

            Comment

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