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  • Best Amateur Draft Pick

    Who was the Cubs best amateur draft pick in franchise history?
    19
    Ken Holtzman (1965)
    0.00%
    0
    Joe Niekro (1966)
    0.00%
    0
    Oscar Gamble (1968)
    0.00%
    0
    Rick Reuschel (1970)
    0.00%
    0
    Burt Hooten (1971)
    0.00%
    0
    Mike Krukow (1973)
    0.00%
    0
    Lee Smith (1975)
    0.00%
    0
    Joe Carter (1981)
    0.00%
    0
    Shawon Dunston (1982)
    10.53%
    2
    Dave Martinez (1983)
    0.00%
    0
    Greg Maddux (1984)
    42.11%
    8
    Jamie Moyer (1984)
    0.00%
    0
    Rafael Palmeiro (1985)
    0.00%
    0
    Mark Grace (1985)
    31.58%
    6
    Kerry Wood (1995)
    0.00%
    0
    Dontrelle Willis (2000)
    5.26%
    1
    Mark Prior (2001)
    10.53%
    2
    2016 World Series Champions

  • #2
    Even though Greg Maddux had a great pitching career, most of his success was with the Braves, not the Cubs. The Cubs only had one successful season while he was on the team. Mark Grace's tenure with the team puts him in the company of guys like Ernie, Billy, and Ron.

    It is suprising so many people still associate Maddux as a Cub, when he will probably go into the hall with a Bravos cap on.

    Comment


    • #3
      Only one of those guys had his own "O-Meter".

      That's what I will base my vote on.
      Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

      Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

      Comment


      • #4
        While I didn't vote for him, I really loved Shawon Dunston when he played for the Cubs.
        I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Slightly Sarcastic
          Only one of those guys had his own "O-Meter"
          What's an O-meter?

          Comment


          • #6
            Now imagine if we kept all of the pitchers after 1984.

            Maddux 15-9
            Moyer 10-8
            Wood 10-7
            Prior 10-5
            Willis 15-9

            Thats a 60-38 record from our starters.
            "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
            -Rogers Hornsby-

            "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
            -Rogers Hornsby-

            Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Uncle Dak
              What's an O-meter?
              There used to be a guy in the bleachers who would hold up a sign that said, "the Shawon-o-meter is at:***" and listed Dunston's average at the time.
              I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

              Comment


              • #8
                This is the Shawon-O-Meter






                I thought it was his average, but it seems I was wrong.


                http://www.flipsidesports.net/shorts/shawon.html


                Aside from being a Nobel Prize-winning mathematician, Dr. Levenstein will be best remembered for devising the most influencial statistical formula since the advent of the "slugging percentage."

                The "Shawon-O-Meter."

                The world was first introduced to this intricate equation in the summer of 1989. As it was then, Shawon Dunston was leading his over-achieving and under-appreciated Cubs toward the National League pennant. Every day during that final stretch, there in the left-center field Bleachers stood a 78-year-old Fields Medal-winner who didn't come for the Old Style. There in the left-center field Bleachers remained an enduring symbol that has been burned into the American psyche and etched in our society's lexicon. The "Shawon-O-Meter," and it's daily computations, became as meaningful as the games themselves.

                Levenstein--and his ever-present Meter--became the rallying cry of the entire Cub-loving nation. Ira would not let them down.

                "As soon as one game would end," says Levenstein's then-assistant, Dr. Wendal Graham, "we'd immediately begin tabulating the Meter for the next day's game. There were many-a-night when we'd work until dawn trying to nail down a scientifically accurate number."

                The common thinking at the time was that the "Shawon-O-Meter" merely incorporated Dunston's batting average. If it were only that simple.

                The reclusive Levenstein, in a symposium delivered at M.I.T. in 1991, explained how the Meter incorporated a multitude of extinuating factors that "went well beyond the rather mundane batting average." The various factors were then computed using the standard Mercatian Projection Quotient within the boundaries set forth by the Riemann Mapping Theorum.

                And from that simple act came the day's "Shawon-O-Meter."

                "My favorite player as a kid was this negro second-baseman named Cool Papa Bell," said the mathematician-turned-Cub-fan in an extremely rare 1994 interview with Scientific America. "He was my favorite player...not because of his statistics, but for reasons I could never fully understand. He was just cool. I never felt that way again until I saw Shawon play, also a negro. In an attempt to support my infatuation with this man, I simply applied a simple mathematical equation to capture what the traditional and simplistic statistics could not."

                Bigotry aside, Dr. Levenstein gave the entire Cub-loving world something more than quotients and theorums and equations when he gave us the "Shawon-O-Meter." He gave us a reason to look beyond Dunston's lifetime .258 batting average; he quantified the seemingly un-quantifiable in showing us exactly why we ALL loved Dunston.

                Before his timely death in 1997, Levenstein showed the world how a Mendoza-esque hitter with a Howitzer for an arm and a pimp-like demeanor about him transcended the stats imposed on him by history.



                Nowadays, to me anyway, I use the Shawon-O-Meter as a barometer to determine how much of a Cub fan someone really is.

                If you remember seeing it on TV, you qualify.

                If you remember sitting behind first base and ducking in fear of your life when Shawon unloaded that cannon of an arm towards first to get a runner, you qualify.

                If you weren't alive to see it, but have since learned about it and thereby embraced the history of the team, you qualify.
                Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

                Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I voted for Grace, because the way I interpreted the question was "Which of these Cubs' amateur draft picks had the best Cubs career."

                  In a few years, Prior would contend, but not now.
                  A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by E.Banks#14
                    I voted for Grace, because the way I interpreted the question was "Which of these Cubs' amateur draft picks had the best Cubs career."

                    In a few years, Prior would contend, but not now.

                    Of all the Cubs I've seen play, Gracie is still my favorite.

                    But I had to make sure Shawon got some love.
                    Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

                    Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wish Gracie was our anouncer. I'm still not over losing Steve Stone either. Those two together would be the best. I heard Grace used to pass around a boot filled with beer in the locker room after big wins.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RyneSandberg23
                        I wish Gracie was our anouncer. I'm still not over losing Steve Stone either. Those two together would be the best. I heard Grace used to pass around a boot filled with beer in the locker room after big wins.
                        You wouldn't get any play by play from those two, and the 3rd person they brought in to do play by play wouldn't get much time to talk. But it would be very entertaining.


                        I would like to see Gracie and Sutcliffe calling games actually. There would be no play by play to speak of, but I'm sure I wouldn't be able to stop laughing at the stories they would tell.
                        Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

                        Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So how can Mark Prior get two votes but Ken Holtzman and Rick Reuschel get none?
                          2016 World Series Champions

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Slightly Sarcastic
                            Nowadays, to me anyway, I use the Shawon-O-Meter as a barometer to determine how much of a Cub fan someone really is.

                            If you remember seeing it on TV, you qualify.

                            If you remember sitting behind first base and ducking in fear of your life when Shawon unloaded that cannon of an arm towards first to get a runner, you qualify.

                            If you weren't alive to see it, but have since learned about it and thereby embraced the history of the team, you qualify.
                            Thank goodness we have you around to tell us all whether or not we qualify as Cub fans. I didn't know where I stood until I heard from you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Big C
                              Thank goodness we have you around to tell us all whether or not we qualify as Cub fans. I didn't know where I stood until I heard from you.
                              I'm happy to help you lost souls find your way home.
                              Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

                              Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

                              Comment

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