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  • Cedeno and Murton?

    I'm optomistc Cedeno can be productive this season, even though he's young. I know nothing about Murton. Can somebody tell me about this guy? Is he starting in left? What do ya'll think about possibly starting these two kids? Mistake or good move?

  • #2
    i like murton

    he came in the nomar deal from the redsox. He could become a 300 hitter and in Chicago show some decent pop. I like his patience at the plate.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't see Dusty playing Cedeno when he has "a proven veteran" in Neifi Perez around. There is no rational reason not to give Murton a lot of playing time in 2006.
      Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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      • #4
        Baker better start Cedeno. I think Cedeno proved himself last year.
        "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
        -Rogers Hornsby-

        "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
        -Rogers Hornsby-

        Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

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        • #5
          Murton's the bomb. Then again, he did go to Georgia Tech.
          I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RyneSandberg23
            I know nothing about Murton. Can somebody tell me about this guy? Is he starting in left?
            Matt Murton
            Height: 6'1"
            Weight: 226
            B/T: R/R
            DOB: 10/3/1981
            Hometown: Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

            Murton was the Red Sox first round (32nd overall) draft pick in the 2003 draft (signed July 8, 2003). He is a product of Georgia Tech, a school that has produced such MLB talent like Garciaparra, Kevin Brown, Mark Teixeira and Jason Varitek. And the site of recent Cub draftee Eric Patterson and acquitional trade of Richard Lewis. Boston drafted Murton with the 32nd overall pick in the 2003 draft.

            Murton came over to the Cubs when Jim Hendry landed Nomar Garciaparra at the trade deadline in July, 2004. He was assigned to Class-A Daytona and seemed to slack off after a hot start with the Red Sox Class-A affiliate, Sarasota. With the BoSox, Murton batted .301 through 102 games but closed out the year hitting .252 in his final 24 games of the regular season at Daytona.

            Murton won the 2004 Florida State League Homerun Derby while a member of Sarasota (outslugging Brandon Sing). Though he doesn't quite have the homerun power of say, Brandon Sing or Brian Dopirak, his strikeout totals (or lack thereof) are astonishing. The fact that he struck out only 42 times in 313 at bats while walking 29 times (in AA) speaks volumes as to his natural plate discpline.

            2004 Sarasota (high A) BoSox
            In 102 games, Murton was 113 for 376 with 60 runs, 16 doubles, 4 triples, 11 hrs, 55 rbi, 42 bb, 61 k, 5/9 sb, .301/.372/.452/.824 before being traded, yet staying in the same Florida State League.

            2004 Daytona (high A) Cubs
            For the Cubs after the trade, he appeared in 24 games, going 20 for 79 with 13 runs, 1 double, 1 triple, 2 hrs, 8 rbi, 8 bb, 10 k, 2/2 sb, .253/.326/.367/.693

            2005 West Tenn (AA)
            He appeared in 78 games, going 107 for 313 with 46 runs, 17 doubles, 4 triples, 8 hrs, 46 rbi, 29 bb, 42 k, 18/23 sb, .342/.403/.498/.901

            2005 Iowa

            He appeared in 9 games going 12 for 34 with 4 runs, 2 doubles, 1 hr, 3 rbi, 4 bb, 8 k, .353/.421/.500/.921

            2005 MLB

            He appeared in 51 games going 45 for 140 with 19 runs, 3 doubles, 2 triples, 7 hrs, 14 rbi, 16 bb, 22 k, 2/3 sb, .321/.386/.521/.907


            Naturally Murton's stroke is built on solid line drive contact. Even when Murton makes outs he does it gracefully and puts the bat on the ball. Currently his power is considered gap-power but he did show flashes this season of monster strength. Scouts have long pegged Murton as a 15-20 hr hitter, but he does have the capability to slug 25-30. It's just that Murton is not the type hitter to sacrifice his contact for more of the power game. Which is good news for Cub fans, since we have enough poor contact, great power prospects. Murton is the perfect two hole hitter, he hits for contact, he can hit for power, he gets on base, he works counts, he takes walks, and he strikes out very little.

            Baserunning And Speed: Murton has been described as a smart, above average baserunner. He's not the fastest guy on the team nor does he run like he's carrying a piano on his back. But the Cubs don't like to run too much, so don't expect to see Murton with more than 5-10 stolen bases.

            Defense: Slightly above average arm in left field with an average glove. Solid, though not overly spectactular he will get the job done. In terms of other left fielders the Cubs have trotted out in recent history, Murton is easily the most defensive sound.

            Biggest Strength: Plate discipline and MLB readiness

            Murton is ready for the MLB, no doubt, which is quite an accomplishment for a player who was just drafted in th 2003 draft. His superb plate discipline is without question his skill that makes him so ready for a full time jump to the majors. An added edge that Murton has is his amazing fundamentals, he can do it all and do it very well. He's still going to grow physically into his body, which will add some more pop to his bat, turning some of those gapping doubles into homers.


            Biggest Weaknesses: Power and Cubs' impatience

            Murton showed a remarkable increase in his power this season, in AA he averaged a homer every 39 at bats, in MLB he averaged a homer every 20 at bats. His MLB sample is small, but Murton turned some of those gapping doubles into homers. Some were aided by the wind, but nonetheless, Murton has showed the ability and promise to slug .450 or beyond.

            The only thing to really fear is that if some of his doubles don't drop, and some of the homers don't leave the yard, the Cubs could look to a tradeable commidity at the deadline. Leftfield is notoriously known as a power hitting position, and if Murton is not putting up the power numbers, Chicago will look elsewhere.


            Keys to Success: Continue to walk and add power

            One thing that can not be taken away from Murton is his uncanny ability to determine balls and strikes, and when to swing or layoff pitches. The kid knows how to hit in all aspects of the game, whether it's advancing a runner from 2nd to 3rd, working a count on a new pitcher, or knowing when to take a pitch the opposite way. At his tender age of 24, Murton is probably one of the most (if not the most) disciplined Cub hitters on the roster. And guess what, he's only going to keep getting better.

            The only flaw to Murton's game is that he plays a power hitter's position, and he likes to play a contact hitter. He reminds me guys like Tony Gwynn or Mark Grace; they could hit for more power but it would take away from their situational and contact aspects of their games, which made them vital to their team's run production. The good news is Murton has more natural power than either of those two, he has more of a body type of either Larry Walker or Bobby Abreu, which both hitters started off as contact hitters that later added their power naturally.


            MLB Comparison and Projection: Larry Walker

            When Murton was first drafted he was compared to Gabe Kapler. A guy who could be a great fourth outfielder with the potential to be an every day starter. The two are similiar in their muscular build and great in-game fundamentals. But I don't end my comparison there. Sure Murton doesn't share Walker's superb arm or Larry's leftiness but Murton draws good offensive projections to Larry Walker especially an early Montreal Walker.

            When Walker first started along he was Mr. Fundamental, he could do it all, play D, make good contact, run the bases very well, and showed flashes of his power. Neither Walker or Murton strike out rapidly, nor did Walker have tremendous homerun power (until he went to Colorado). Like Walker, Murton is one of the intangible guys, he brings multi-facets to his team, he's an asset to his club.


            Bob’s Bottom Line: Barring some major turn of events, Murton will be given the starting role of left fielder for the 2006 season. But the Cubs won't stick with him for the entire season if he goes into a prolonged slump. That usually doesn't happen with a contact hitter with good plate discipline like Murton though. Ideally, Murton would be in the two spot but Baker might use the excuse of Murton is needed lower in the order for production, sixth or seventh. As long as Murton is in the lineup, the Cubs will have a youngster that puts up dependable numbers. Depending on his at bats, I fully expect to see Matt hit .280 or greater, along with a OBP-AVG differential of .65+, and a slugging percentage around .450 or greater.

            For more Scouting Reports
            What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
            Line Drive: .356
            HBP: .342
            Non-Intentional Walk: .315
            Intentional Walk: .176
            Outfield Fly: .035
            Groundball: -.101
            Bunts: -.103
            Infield Fly: -.243
            Strikeout: -.287
            It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by KCGHOST
              I can't see Dusty playing Cedeno when he has "a proven veteran" in Neifi Perez around. There is no rational reason not to give Murton a lot of playing time in 2006.
              i disagree. he's been hyping up cedeno most of this winter. while i dont expect cedeno to play 145 games, i think he will get at least 2/3 of the playing time, which isnt too bad. rememeber, his neifiness can play second base as well.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rockin500
                i disagree. he's been hyping up cedeno most of this winter. while i dont expect cedeno to play 145 games, i think he will get at least 2/3 of the playing time, which isnt too bad. rememeber, his neifiness can play second base as well.
                If Dusty can think up an excuse to start Neifi over Walker at second, I want to be the first to hear it.
                A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by E.Banks#14
                  If Dusty can think up an excuse to start Neifi over Walker at second, I want to be the first to hear it.
                  defense? lefty matchup? though that would mean it would be hairston most likely.

                  even a day off. and the very likely thing that one of the middle infielders will get hurt. its bound to happen with our luck.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rockin500
                    and the very likely thing that one of the middle infielders will get hurt.
                    Hopefully Neifi.
                    Jerseys hanging in my den : Santo, Jenkins, Williams, Banks, Grace, Sandberg, Dawson, Eckersley, Sutcliffe, Wood, Prior, Zambrano, Lee

                    Oddly enough, I never bought a Sosa jersey, even during his best years.

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                    • #11
                      Walker hit .061 points better against lefties than righties last year, slugged .141 points better, and got on base .056 points more (if that makes any sense?), and about 1/4 of his ABs were against lefties.

                      But you're still right, because Dusty doesn't know that, how would he? That info is available to me, but I bet Dusty doesn't have access to it...
                      A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Bob Sacamento. That report was great! Do you have access to Cedeno's scouting report?

                        I'm officially excited about this kid. I love that he's a smart player and that this scout sees so much potential. I will never understand why people think there are certain positions where you are supposed to hit for power? I will take the productive star who doesn't hit hr's any day. Everyone ripped on Mark Grace not having power at first base too. Leadership, great glove, .300 plus every year.... nuff said!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I like seeing both these guys at bat.
                          "I believe in the soul ... the small of a woman's back, the hanging curveball, high fiber, good scotch, that the novels of Susan Sontag are self-indulgent, overrated crap. I believe Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. I believe there ought to be a constitutional amendment outlawing Astroturf and the designated hitter."

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                          • #14
                            Give em BOTH a chance

                            I see no reason not to start BOTH these kids and let"s see what they can do. For the naysayers who say ya can't win with TWO rookies in the lineup, can you say 1989, Walton and Smith, both rookies, were MAJOR contribtors to that teams success. I like the discipline Murton and Cedeno showed at the plate, we DESPARATELY need more of that, and they both showed the ability to hang tough against good pitchers, fouling off pitches until they got one they could handle and get basehits. I have to agree that the BIGGEST obstacle for these kids this year may be Bakers impatience with youth, lets hope not.
                            Take Solace in the knowledge that, whatever else can be said of you,you didn't trade Brock for Broglio

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KCGHOST
                              I can't see Dusty playing Cedeno when he has "a proven veteran" in Neifi Perez around. There is no rational reason not to give Murton a lot of playing time in 2006.
                              You didn't watch many Cubs game last year then. Murton looks very promising. His patience at the plate is great, he'll take the ball the other way, doesn't try to pull outside pitches and he's not a bad defender.

                              Comment

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