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  • Cool site for pitcher's pitch stats

    I don't know how accurate the information is, but this is a really cool site that includes information on pitchers.

    http://baseball.bornbybits.com/plots/players.html

    For example, it will tell you what mix of pitches Zambrano likes to throw and how fast his different pitches are. Not specifically Cubs, but has a lot of Cubs pitchers listed.
    To offset some of the pain of being a diehard Cubs fan, I've learned to also be a moderate Yankees fan.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Scartissue View Post
    I don't know how accurate the information is, but this is a really cool site that includes information on pitchers.

    http://baseball.bornbybits.com/plots/players.html

    For example, it will tell you what mix of pitches Zambrano likes to throw and how fast his different pitches are. Not specifically Cubs, but has a lot of Cubs pitchers listed.
    Great site, the info is accurate in terms of data turned in. It definately gives up a pitchers tendencies, which most MLB clubs know going in, most fans don't.
    What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
    Line Drive: .356
    HBP: .342
    Non-Intentional Walk: .315
    Intentional Walk: .176
    Outfield Fly: .035
    Groundball: -.101
    Bunts: -.103
    Infield Fly: -.243
    Strikeout: -.287
    It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting, but how do you know what is "good" movement from looking at the site? I know Rich Hill has an excellent curve, and Wuertz a killer slider, but I can't tell that from the data. How do you do that?

      I also noticed that Marquis threw exactly ONE curveball last year!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jeff Pico View Post
        I also noticed that Marquis threw exactly ONE curveball last year!


        Maybe someone tell him to mix it up this season? Maybe that way he'll have more than 11 quality starts.
        Senior Editor/Featured Writer for Home Of The Chiefs

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeff Pico View Post
          Interesting, but how do you know what is "good" movement from looking at the site? I know Rich Hill has an excellent curve, and Wuertz a killer slider, but I can't tell that from the data. How do you do that?
          You judge movement on the curveball by their negative X and Z along with the velocity and location of the fastball. The higher the negative X and Z, the more lateral and drop movement there was to the pitch. Also the velocity and location plays a big part to the hitters deception. With Rich it's seen in that he concentrates his fastballs and changeups high and inside to righties while his curveballs are down and outside to righties and his slider fits right in between to fool hitters. It's a pattern most people who watched Hill pitch knew that when he was successful, he made hitters chase his high fastball and swing horribly at his slow sweeping curve because they both come from the same arm slot.

          I would like to compare something that has always been discussed and that is the Zito vs Hill curveball. According to last year's stats, Zito curve was -1.45 inches in X-plane and -12.3 inches the Z-plane with an average velocity of 71.82 mph. While Hill's curveball was -6.8 in the X-plane and -8.3 inches with an average velocity of 73.85 mph. When looking at the numbers it appears that Zito's drops (Z) more yet has less lateral movement (X) but those numbers discrepancies are more due to their release point/arm angle than their actual curveballs (as seen by their release points). Zito throws an overhand curve while Hill is more 3/4. When looking at their speed/horizontal and speed/vertical movement, the two curves are very distinct. Zito's is a 12-6 while Hill is a 1-7, also to note Zito's fastball average was 86.01 and Hill's was 91.13 mph.

          With Wuertz his release point for his fastball, changeup, and slider were identical, and his velocity was close as well (FB at 93 SL at 86.5, CU at 85.4). That just plays havoc on a hitter, especially when the pitcher throws a slider nearly 60% of the time and a fastball (33%).

          The data is all there, you just have to interpret it.
          What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
          Line Drive: .356
          HBP: .342
          Non-Intentional Walk: .315
          Intentional Walk: .176
          Outfield Fly: .035
          Groundball: -.101
          Bunts: -.103
          Infield Fly: -.243
          Strikeout: -.287
          It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jeff Pico View Post
            I also noticed that Marquis threw exactly ONE curveball last year!
            Actually it might be misidentified. The movement and velocity indicate that very well could be a changeup.
            What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
            Line Drive: .356
            HBP: .342
            Non-Intentional Walk: .315
            Intentional Walk: .176
            Outfield Fly: .035
            Groundball: -.101
            Bunts: -.103
            Infield Fly: -.243
            Strikeout: -.287
            It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob,

              Can you explain to me how Rich Hill can throw a 1-7 curveball, when he is a lefty and his arm is nowhere near vertical at release of his pitch. I believe he also supinates the release of his curve, which means that he pulls it across his body, instead of driving it. Am I misinterpreting the 1-7, that is supposed to be taken from a clock, correct? If anything, I would say Hill's curveball is an 10-4 or 11-5 at best. Can you explain that to me? Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
                Bob,

                Can you explain to me how Rich Hill can throw a 1-7 curveball, when he is a lefty and his arm is nowhere near vertical at release of his pitch. I believe he also supinates the release of his curve, which means that he pulls it across his body, instead of driving it. Am I misinterpreting the 1-7, that is supposed to be taken from a clock, correct? If anything, I would say Hill's curveball is an 10-4 or 11-5 at best. Can you explain that to me? Thanks
                He probably meant 11-5. I do that sometime. Say it's a 1-7 curve but forgets that it's a lefty throwing it.
                "Back before I injured my hip, I thought going to the gym was for wimps."
                Bo Jackson

                Actually, I think they were about the same because I lettered in all sports, and I was a two-time state decathlon champion.
                Bo Jackson

                My sophomore year I placed 2nd, and my junior and senior year - I got smart and piled up enough points between myself and second place where I didn't have to run the mile.
                Bo Jackson

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks, I figured, but I just wanted to be sure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
                    Thanks, I figured, but I just wanted to be sure.
                    It was 2AM PT when I posted that but yeah it's meant to say Hill throws an 11-5, which is the lefty version of 1-7.
                    What a Batted Ball is Worth (in terms of a run):
                    Line Drive: .356
                    HBP: .342
                    Non-Intentional Walk: .315
                    Intentional Walk: .176
                    Outfield Fly: .035
                    Groundball: -.101
                    Bunts: -.103
                    Infield Fly: -.243
                    Strikeout: -.287
                    It's now officially Doctor Bob Sacamento, D.C., C.S.C.S., and working on my D.A.B.C.O. (Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedics)

                    Comment

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