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Cavarretta Tops All Living Major leaguers In "Played in MLB Most Seasons Ago"

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  • Cavarretta Tops All Living Major leaguers In "Played in MLB Most Seasons Ago"

    The death of several of the most senior former major league players in 2009, leaves the Cubs' 20-year star first baseman, Phil Cavarretta as #1 in one important category. Most notably the 2009 deaths of the oldest MLB player Bill Werber (MLB debut -1930) and second oldest player Lonnie Frey, another former Cub, (MLB debut 1933) helped to elevate Cavarretta to his position of notoriety.
    Although he doesn't even rank among the 15 oldest living major league players, Cavarreta holds the distinction of having played in the major leagues the most seasons ago among all surviving MLB players. Cavarretta made his major league debut less than two months after his 18th birthday, on September 16, 1934. As such, in the upcoming 2010 season, it will be 76 years since since he made his major league debut. That tops all other living MLB players.
    He won the Cubs' regular first baseman's job the following Spring Training, while still 18 (not turning 19 until July 19) and started about 95 per cent of the Cubs' games at first base in 1935. Cavarretta was a fixture with the Cubs for 20 years from 1934 to 1953. He served as a player-manager his final three years there. His career concluded after playing for the crosstown White Sox in 1954 & 1955. In all, Cavarretta played 1953 of his 2030 MLB career games as a Cub. He made four National League All-Star teams (1944-1947), hit .293 lifetime over 22 seasons, and won a N.L batting title with a .355 mark in 1945.
    Others who have survived while playing the most seasons since their MLB debuts include or Runners-Up in this category include Buddy Lewis (MLB debut - 1935), Bob Feller (1936 debut), Eddie Joost (also a 1936 MLB debut), Clarence "Ace" Parker, who was elected to the Pro Football Hall Of Fame and is both the second oldest living Pro Football player and the 3rd oldest living major leaguer (1937 MLB debut) and Tony Malinosky, who at 100 is the oldest living major leaguer, who also debuted in 1937.

    -philliesfiend55 (Dennis Orlandini)-
    Last edited by philliesfiend55; 02-23-2010, 07:42 AM.

  • #2
    One of my personal favorite Cubs. You failed to mention he won the 1945 MVP award, on the last Cubs team to make the World Series.
    "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
    -Rogers Hornsby-

    "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
    -Rogers Hornsby-

    Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

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    • #3
      Cavarretta must have had a great World Series. He's one of the few to be named MVP to have played for the losing team.

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      • #4
        Sorry, Cubsfan97 ! You must have meant Cavarretta was the 1945 National League MVP. At first, I took your post to mean that he was the '45 World Series MVP. - My Bad!

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        • #5
          Cavaretta played one year too long. He finished the 1953 season having played 1, 953 games.
          Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
          Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
          Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
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          Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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          • #6
            Yeah sorry for the confusion, CCN, I wonder how many players have had that occurrence before, not necessarily at the end of their career, but at least at the end of a season.
            "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
            -Rogers Hornsby-

            "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
            -Rogers Hornsby-

            Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

            Comment


            • #7
              There are currently 16 living players who played in the 1930s. There is an interesting symmetry here. 5 debuted in 1939, 4 in 1938, 3 in 1937, 2 in 1936, and 1 each in 1934 and 1935.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bbxpert View Post
                There are currently 16 living players who played in the 1930s. There is an interesting symmetry here. 5 debuted in 1939, 4 in 1938, 3 in 1937, 2 in 1936, and 1 each in 1934 and 1935.
                I'm just amazed that they're all still alive, even though it really only would put them around the age of 90, which is a long time for someone to live, but nothing that really blows my mind.

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