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  • #16
    His swing is almost a carbon copy? I can think of several other MLBers that his swing looks more similar to. What Ramirez is at Iowa doing is teaching game prep, pitch selection, etc.

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    • #17
      Busy day today. Nate DFA'd, Turner claimed from Miami and Fujikawa activated. Also, Rusney Castillo worked out for the Cubs at Wrigley.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
        His swing is almost a carbon copy? I can think of several other MLBers that his swing looks more similar to. What Ramirez is at Iowa doing is teaching game prep, pitch selection, etc.
        Yeah, what would the mlb network know? Along with providing side by side comparisons

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
          Yeah, what would the mlb network know? Along with providing side by side comparisons
          The Cubs didn't sign Ramirez to go put Baez in a cage and tell him swing just like I did. That's not how things work. The MLB Network also has players come on the show suggesting lining up knocker knuckles. It's difficult to find more than Pujols or Suzuki lining them up in stance. The core portion of most MLB swings are very similar. Here's another one someone else has done.



          Others have suggested Bautista, etc.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
            The Cubs didn't sign Ramirez to go put Baez in a cage and tell him swing just like I did. That's not how things work. The MLB Network also has players come on the show suggesting lining up knocker knuckles. It's difficult to find more than Pujols or Suzuki lining them up in stance. The core portion of most MLB swings are very similar. Here's another one someone else has done.



            Others have suggested Bautista, etc.
            At what point did I say Ramirez was brought in to do that? Never did

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
              At what point did I say Ramirez was brought in to do that? Never did
              Hmmm.-

              Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
              With manny as his hitting coach, his swing is almost a carbon copy now...ramirez apparently helped in removing some holes in it
              Your implication to me is that Baez mechanics changed to look like Manny's, because Manny is his hitting coach. Now, if that's not what you meant, I understand that plain words on the internet can be misunderstood, cap.

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              • #22
                I agree with uncoach, baez swing is very unlike manny. the sheffield comparison is a good one because both have a very "loose" and dynamic barrell load while manny is very quiet and in control with his barrel having very little barrell movement pre launch.

                brandon phillips has a similar barrell loading pattern too:
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x7HzrPFxG8

                not sure if I'm a big fan. I like a late and dynamic barrel loading because it allows kind of a running start but if it is that violent and late it can cause timing problems and probably high K numbers.

                I really like buster posey's loading pattern. he loads his barrel back and behind while the hips open but does it in control and not as violent as baez or phillips.
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-FXVrYymKw
                I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                • #23
                  Jeff Moore over at MLB Prospect Watch put together a write-up on Baez last week. I think it sums things up fairly well when looking at expectations of Baez's game. Here's an exerpt:
                  Baez has extreme bat speed and knows it, and while that confidence is good for a hitter, it can get him into trouble. Because of that ability, Baez believes that he can hit everything, and he's closer to not being wrong about that than most players. Still, that bravado causes him to swing at pitches he can't hit. His .172/.238/.379 line this April in his first taste of Triple-A was partially because he saw more of these pitches than ever before. To his credit, however, he adjusted. If you take out April, Baez is hitting .276/.337/.533, which the Cubs would surely take.

                  What we've seen is the one fatal flaw in Baez's game. We don't know what position he'll play, but that will work itself out. We don't know how much of his raw power will play in games, but we can be pretty certain that enough of it will manifest itself for him to be a productive player. What we do know, however, is that Baez will never be a high-OBP guy and will always strike out a lot.

                  The extremeness of those last two qualities will determine Baez's future. If his aggressiveness is exposed, it will keep his power at moderate levels and his on-base percentage below average. The overall package will still be a strong player, but not the elite player that represents his ceiling. If he takes what pitchers give him, which will be more free passes as his power reputation spreads around the league, it will allow all of his other tools to play up, including that prodigious power. He'll never be a guy who walks a lot, but if he can work his walk rate up towards the 10 percent mark it will turn him into an elite player.

                  The strike outs will keep Baez from being a .300 hitter, but it's realistic to expect him to settle into the .260/.270 range. That would put his on-base percentage in the .320 range, just slightly above league average. Where he'll seperate himself is with the power, and his ability to make contact will dictate which side of the .500 mark he sits. A .265/.325/.480 would make him among the better second basemen in the league. If all of those play up a tick, putting him in the .280/.340/.550 range, he's an elite player.
                  "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by dominik View Post
                    I agree with uncoach, baez swing is very unlike manny. the sheffield comparison is a good one because both have a very "loose" and dynamic barrell load while manny is very quiet and in control with his barrel having very little barrell movement pre launch.

                    brandon phillips has a similar barrell loading pattern too:
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x7HzrPFxG8

                    not sure if I'm a big fan. I like a late and dynamic barrel loading because it allows kind of a running start but if it is that violent and late it can cause timing problems and probably high K numbers.

                    I really like buster posey's loading pattern. he loads his barrel back and behind while the hips open but does it in control and not as violent as baez or phillips.
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-FXVrYymKw
                    You bring up a good point about Baez and one I've thought about. He tries to get a huge, running start. It would concern me and frankly I would probably quiet it down a bit, but this is his personal style. I'd almost be too afraid to coach that out of him. Also, his K rate decreased and walk rate increased. Both were at acceptable levels, which is why they called him up. They wanted to get this out of the way now, because he takes a bit of time at each level to adjust. What they are thinking is he gets 50 games in, heads to the off-season to work on some things and make his adjustments, so he can come out ready to go in 2015.

                    I could still nit pick certain things about this comparison, too, but it's easy to see why he gets the Sheffield comparison that goes beyond the bat speed.
                    baez.gif

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                    • #25
                      The thing is it is awfully silly to say never with a young player. Soriano and Sosa were both able to get their OBP above .320 and they were both free swingers. If Baex can keep the power, slightly improve his ability to make good contact, and is patient he'll get into the .340 to .350 OBP range at the very least.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
                        The thing is it is awfully silly to say never with a young player. Soriano and Sosa were both able to get their OBP above .320 and they were both free swingers. If Baex can keep the power, slightly improve his ability to make good contact, and is patient he'll get into the .340 to .350 OBP range at the very least.
                        Yep. And once he gets the hang of that, certainly he will be pitched around some. I would expect that when all the prospects are up next season that Castro will be hitting behind Baez at 6th. If I am wanting to avoid the big hit, I'd likely pitch around Javy to get to Starlin. And that's not a knock against Castro. He's had a nice rebound.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
                          The thing is it is awfully silly to say never with a young player. Soriano and Sosa were both able to get their OBP above .320 and they were both free swingers. If Baex can keep the power, slightly improve his ability to make good contact, and is patient he'll get into the .340 to .350 OBP range at the very least.
                          I think being a free swinger is OK as long as you are not expanding the zone too much. A good hitter does not need to be overly selective at the plate and expanding the zone a little is OK, even miguel cabrera often does that.

                          however what is bad is when a player swings at pitches WAY outside the zone and the pitchers start to notice without the player being able to adjust. baez does not need to walk a whole lot but he will need to be able to lay off balls way off the plate or MLB pitchers will punish that way more than minor league pitchers.

                          we will see if baez will learn that and force pitchers at least t throw close to the zone.
                          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                          • #28
                            Are you a little bit worried about Bryants K rates?

                            he does hit extremely well in the minors but his strikeouts have gone up at any level he played at. he does compensate that very well with power and walks and still has a very good average but his BABIP is insanely high. He will probably be an above average BABIP guy but 28% in AAA ball is really a lot of Ks.

                            people will say that strikeouts are just another out and for example mike trout strikes out a lot too but trout struck out 17% in AA and about 19% in AAA ball.

                            if we asume that his Ks will be going up a little in the majors Bryants strikeout rates might be closer to adam dunn than to mike trout. that being said due to his walks and power he would probably still be a valuable hitter (like dunn) and he will probably hit for higher average than dunn because he is faster and doesn't hit as many fly balls but still his Ks are a little reason to worry.
                            I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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