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Rocky Bridges, Bob Usher and Elmer Gray, former Reds figures, pass away

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  • Rocky Bridges, Bob Usher and Elmer Gray, former Reds figures, pass away

    Infielder Rocky Bridges played for the Red from 1953 to 1957, hitting .241 in 346 games. He was the club's primary second baseman in 1953.

    Everett Lamar Bridges, better known as 'Rocky" when he was a popular manager of the Hawaii Islanders in the early 1970s, has died.

    His death, at age 87 in Idaho, was reported by several media outlets.

    After an 11-year career as a journeyman Major League infielder with seven teams, Bridges spent 21 seasons as a manager in the minors, compiling a 1,300-1,358 record. While he coached in the majors he never managed there.
    Read more:

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/b...l?id=290353311

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    Bob Usher played for the Reds in 1946, 1947, 1950 and 1951, hitting .227 in 321 games.

    Robert Royce Usher
    March 1, 1925-Dec. 29,2014
    San Jose, CA

    Robert Royce Usher (Bob) is survived by his wife Eleanor of 37 years, his children Steve Usher, Stan Usher, Janice Boor and Janet Huckibe. Bob had 9 grandchildren, 5 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

    Bob proudly served his country in the US Navy during WWII when he was stationed in the Pacific. After the war, Bob played professional baseball and he retired from MLB baseball after playing for 15 years.
    Read more:

    http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/mer...&pid=173680505

    _______

    Elmer Gray scouted for the Reds from 1967 to 1984. He died in August, but his death was not reported in this forum.

    Elmer Gray was a scout with the Cincinnati Reds in 1969 when he recommended that the club draft a raw kid from Donora, Pa. He stuck to his convictions even though most people around baseball wondered whether the player in question could be a Major Leaguer.

    That player was Ken Griffey Sr., a 29th-round selection who went on to become a three-time all star player during a 19-year career in the majors and was a key piece of the “Big Red Machine” teams that won World Series in 1975 and 1976.
    Read more:

    http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/p...s/201408220085

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