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Greatest Owner in Reds History

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  • Greatest Owner in Reds History

    The Reds have had 17 principal owners in the 134-year history of their franchise. Which was the best for the Reds?
    8
    John T. Brush (1891-1902)
    0.00%
    0
    Bob Castellini (2006-Present)
    0.00%
    0
    Powell Crosley Jr. (1933-1961)
    75.00%
    6
    Garry Herrmann (1902-1927)
    0.00%
    0
    Marge Schott (1984-1999)
    0.00%
    0
    Other (please specify)
    25.00%
    2
    "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
    "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
    "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
    "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

  • #2
    Louis Nippert

    Comment


    • #3
      Louis Nippert

      Comment


      • #4
        I understand that the Nipperts happened to own the team during the majority of its greatest successes on the field, but Mr. Nippert took the reigns in 1973 and sold in 1981 and was largely a hands-off owner. The Big Red Machine had already been assembled under GM Bob Howsam. Nippert made two notable contributions during his ownership tenure; neither of which were positives for the Reds. First, Nippert was responsible for replacing Howsam with the disastrous Dick Wagner as GM and secondly, Nippert steadfastly refused to engage in the newly created free agent market which developed during his tenure, preventing the Reds from competing for top talent.

        Nippert presided over a pair of World Championships (which really can't be credited to him or to anyone he put in place), but also presided over - and hired the personnel responsible for - the (unnecessary) dismantling of the greatest dynasty in Cincinnati sports history.

        Is there some evidence to suggest he deserves more positive credit and/or less condemnation?
        "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
        "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
        "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
        "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't know how things would have gone, maybe it would have been a total train wreck, or maybe it would have been a glorious era of contention and championships.... It's a shame that Ty Cobb didn't end up buying the Reds when he was in negotiations to do so after his playing career ended. I don't recall the precise year, it may have been at the time when Powel Crosley wound up buying the club. Crosley had a fairly successful reign with 3 pennants and a World Series win.

          I think would have been interesting to see how the complex and highly combative / competitive Cobb would have done as an owner. If not the Reds I wish he had bought SOME team, remained in baseball and run a club so we all would have seen another facet of Cobb in baseball.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Calif_Eagle View Post
            I don't know how things would have gone, maybe it would have been a total train wreck, or maybe it would have been a glorious era of contention and championships.... It's a shame that Ty Cobb didn't end up buying the Reds when he was in negotiations to do so after his playing career ended. I don't recall the precise year, it may have been at the time when Powel Crosley wound up buying the club. Crosley had a fairly successful reign with 3 pennants and a World Series win.

            I think would have been interesting to see how the complex and highly combative / competitive Cobb would have done as an owner. If not the Reds I wish he had bought SOME team, remained in baseball and run a club so we all would have seen another facet of Cobb in baseball.
            Crosley bought the team out of receivership. I can't recall whether it was at this time, or at the team's prior purchase, that Cobb was negotiating. Do you recall why Cobb was unable to close the deal?
            "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
            "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
            "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
            "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Brad Harris View Post
              Crosley bought the team out of receivership. I can't recall whether it was at this time, or at the team's prior purchase, that Cobb was negotiating. Do you recall why Cobb was unable to close the deal?
              The deal is mentioned briefly in Charles Alexander's bio of Cobb. On page 213 of the paperback edition it states that Cobb made a 1929 offer of $275,000 for the Reds franchise then went on a trip to Europe while the present owners supposedly considered it. Cobb was quoted by reporters as saying he intended to be "back in baseball next season" (1930) at about this same time. Evidently (Obviously) the deal fell through somehow although Alexander doesn't elaborate as to how or why. He takes the stance that Cobb got lucky because the Depression started while Cobb was away (stock market crash) and perhaps either Cobb rethought the idea and his offer or the owners just rejected it, but over the next 4 seasons Alexander claims in the book almost every club sustained big losses and/or attendance drops "including the 2nd Division Reds".

              That's all I know about it.

              The same page has a passage that says Cobb considered retirement in early 1928 and was poised to buy the PCL's San Francisco Seals, but then decided he wanted to play one more year and bowed out of the group he was set to lead.
              Last edited by Calif_Eagle; 07-23-2015, 05:51 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Calif_Eagle View Post
                The deal is mentioned briefly in Charles Alexander's bio of Cobb. On page 213 of the paperback edition it states that Cobb made a 1929 offer of $275,000 for the Reds franchise then went on a trip to Europe while the present owners supposedly considered it. Cobb was quoted by reporters as saying he intended to be "back in baseball next season" (1930) at about this same time. Evidently (Obviously) the deal fell through somehow although Alexander doesn't elaborate as to how or why. He takes the stance that Cobb got lucky because the Depression started while Cobb was away (stock market crash) and perhaps either Cobb rethought the idea and his offer or the owners just rejected it, but over the next 4 seasons Alexander claims in the book almost every club sustained big losses and/or attendance drops "including the 2nd Division Reds".

                That's all I know about it.

                The same page has a passage that says Cobb considered retirement in early 1928 and was poised to buy the PCL's San Francisco Seals, but then decided he wanted to play one more year and bowed out of the group he was set to lead.
                Thanks for this. I've found some references to the sale in newspapers of the day, but nothing yet to explain why the deal fell through.
                "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                Comment

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