Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mike Piazza Equipment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mike Piazza Equipment

    Did Piazza wear kneepads underneath his baseball pants? I saw some pictures reading about the Piazza era Mets and it certainly looks like he has knee pads under his pants.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

  • #2
    Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
    Did Piazza wear kneepads underneath his baseball pants? I saw some pictures reading about the Piazza era Mets and it certainly looks like he has knee pads under his pants.
    Lots of whispers Piazza was running around naked under his pants. It was a scandal at the time.


    "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

      Lots of whispers Piazza was running around naked under his pants. It was a scandal at the time.
      Get out you're full of it. Seriously google it. Or else the guy has the biggest kneecaps in history.
      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

        Get out you're full of it. Seriously google it. Or else the guy has the biggest kneecaps in history.
        Quite clearly he has knee pads on.

        Ok where do we go from here?
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Never seen anything like it.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
            Never seen anything like it.
            You have never seen anyone have knee pads on under their pants? It happens.

            FYI - Nike makes a pair of baseball sliding "shorts" that go past the knee and have padding.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Paulypal View Post

              You have never seen anyone have knee pads on under their pants? It happens.

              FYI - Nike makes a pair of baseball sliding "shorts" that go past the knee and have padding.
              Yea, I don't know when sliding shorts became popular but I knew about them in high school in the early 2000's. I never saw anyone wear knee pads before.
              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

                Yea, I don't know when sliding shorts became popular but I knew about them in high school in the early 2000's. I never saw anyone wear knee pads before.
                They've been around over 100 years. Cobb wore them. In fact, he stopped wearing them the year he stole 96 bases. He felt they slowed him down. He reportedly had open, infected, sores from his hips to his ankles by season's end.


                "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

                  They've been around over 100 years. Cobb wore them. In fact, he stopped wearing them the year he stole 96 bases. He felt they slowed him down. He reportedly had open, infected, sores from his hips to his ankles by season's end.
                  I can believe it. Strawberries take a long time to heal. Usually around 2 weeks. Maybe a week if you take care of them. How much was Cobb sliding headfirst?
                  "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't think Cobb ever slid headfirst. He was famous for leading with his spikes. If he'd started sliding headfirst, avenging infielders would have probably initiated collisions - their feet and his face.


                    "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
                      I don't think Cobb ever slid headfirst. He was famous for leading with his spikes. If he'd started sliding headfirst, avenging infielders would have probably initiated collisions - their feet and his face.
                      Yea, I know he was famous for spiking. I asked because I'd never seen a picture of him sliding headfirst. I'm not sure when the headfirst slide came into vogue. At least by the time Pete Rose was beginning his career.
                      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        From Wikipedia..........for whatever that is worth:

                        Methods of sliding[edit]


                        Players generally slide feet-first but sometimes also use a head-first technique. Strictly speaking, going headfirst into a base constitutes more of a dive than a slide, but the term "slide" is still commonly used. This alternate method has been used in Major League Baseball at least since the middle-1880s when the innovation was popularized by the St. Louis Browns of the American Association.[1] Yet even in the majors, it remained relatively uncommon until it became popularized by Pete Rose in the 1960s. Headfirst sliding has since become a common practice for various players on all levels of professional baseball, but it is often restricted on the amateur level.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paulypal View Post
                          From Wikipedia..........for whatever that is worth:

                          Methods of sliding[edit]


                          Players generally slide feet-first but sometimes also use a head-first technique. Strictly speaking, going headfirst into a base constitutes more of a dive than a slide, but the term "slide" is still commonly used. This alternate method has been used in Major League Baseball at least since the middle-1880s when the innovation was popularized by the St. Louis Browns of the American Association.[1] Yet even in the majors, it remained relatively uncommon until it became popularized by Pete Rose in the 1960s. Headfirst sliding has since become a common practice for various players on all levels of professional baseball, but it is often restricted on the amateur level.
                          Ha, that famous photo of him diving headfirst with his helmet off was in my head. That's the first picture I've ever seen of a guy sliding headfirst. It's way more likely to get you hurt but gets you to the bag faster and allows for better tag avoidance. Gives you worse strawberries too.
                          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                          Comment

                          Ad Widget

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X