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Shea's Booby Prize - Our 3 Least Favorite Mets

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  • Shea's Booby Prize - Our 3 Least Favorite Mets

    Not every player to toil in the orange and blue has been loved by the Shea Faithful !

    :grouchy:grouchy:grouchy:grouchy:grouchy:grouchy

    Which THREE (3) Mets will rise to the top, or bottom perhaps, of the garbage heap and win the distintion of being
    THE LEAST POPULAR METS EVER ?


    Vote away ... and feel free to elaborate on your choices !
    141
    Roberto Alomar
    7.09%
    10
    Bobby Bonilla
    13.48%
    19
    Luis Castillo
    3.55%
    5
    Vince Coleman
    9.22%
    13
    George Foster
    7.80%
    11
    Mike Glavine
    0.00%
    0
    Tom Glavine
    3.55%
    5
    Richie Hebner
    2.13%
    3
    Aaron Heilman
    7.80%
    11
    Tommy Herr
    1.42%
    2
    Mickey Lolich
    0.71%
    1
    Braden Looper
    4.26%
    6
    Kaz Matsui
    3.55%
    5
    Guillermo Mota
    6.38%
    9
    Mel Rojas
    4.26%
    6
    Juan Samuel
    6.38%
    9
    Doug Sisk
    3.55%
    5
    Mo Vaughn
    3.55%
    5
    Victor Zambrano
    4.96%
    7
    other (provide name & reason)
    6.38%
    9
    Last edited by whoisonit; 11-19-2008, 04:03 PM.

  • #2
    My bottom 3 :

    1 - Richie Hebner This creep arrived in '79. To be a Met fan in those days was ... humbling, even as a kid. Hebner was a real player, the kind of guy the Mets just didn't have. It was exciting. He proceeded to trash the team and city like no player had ever done before. Little Met fans every where had their worst insecurities confirmed - we really sucked. Thanks Richie. Too bad you didn't fall into one of those graves you dug in the off season.

    2 - George Forster What a disapointment this guy was. Opening Day 1982 Shea was pulsating as those of us there roared when he was introduced. The dark days were over, we had a star !
    The very first Met I ever heard booed. I was one of the booers. It felt so strange to boo a Met, but he earned it.
    He was the king of the 6-4-3 rally killing DP. He had a crappy attitude to boot. 1986 -> Gary Carter was writhing in pain, on the ground behind the behind the plate - Foster yelled out from the dugout in his high pitched voice - Hey Gary, the camera's over here, look this way. -> Carter continued playing, won a ring that year, Foster was released.

    3 - Juan Samuel Lenny Dykstra and Roger McDowell were traded to Philly for this stud. This was the trade that killed our swaggering, ass-kicking mid & late 80's team. It all went down hill from here. Nails & Roger went to a Series with Philly. Samuel ushered in an era darker than the late 70's. The symbol of the dismantling, I cringe just seeing his name.

    Honorable mention - Tom Glavine. His brother too.

    Comment


    • #3
      My least 3 are

      1 Bobby Bo due to the fact that while he was in NY he did absolutly nothing.

      2 Aaron Heilman because he couldn't hold a league even if he was pitching against St Mary's for the blind

      3 I dont recall his name but he holds the record for consecutive losses in ML history. He started out as a started then was moved to the pen. The Mets eventually traded him to St Louis I believe it was....Help me with the name.

      Comment


      • #4
        1) Heilman
        2) Matsui
        3) Glavine (Mota is right behind him)

        My reason. A little obvious.
        Check out my Yankee blog http://questfor27.blogspot.com/

        TRIBUTE TO MOOOSE (MIKE MUSSINA)
        ~~~~Thanks for all of the great memories Mike~~~~~
        You have my HOF vote and good luck in the future now that you have retired. Thanks for the wins you gave the Yanks from 2001-2008. Have an enjoyable retirement.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gioconvj View Post
          My least 3 are

          1 Bobby Bo due to the fact that while he was in NY he did absolutly nothing.

          2 Aaron Heilman because he couldn't hold a league even if he was pitching against St Mary's for the blind

          3 I dont recall his name but he holds the record for consecutive losses in ML history. He started out as a started then was moved to the pen. The Mets eventually traded him to St Louis I believe it was....Help me with the name.
          Bonilla was actually a productive player when he was here.....sure he was a bit of a jerk (though I think its taken to extremes), but like I said, he was a good player. It wasnt his fault most of his teammates sucked and/or got injured.

          Aaron Heilman has held plentyyyyy of leads for us. Granted 2008 could not have been worse, but dont get carried away with his whole body of work.

          And the guy your thinking of is Anthony Young....and he was NOT that bad of a pitcher. He wasnt good by any means, but that losing streak had ALOTTTT of bad luck involved in it.
          Last edited by m8644; 11-19-2008, 06:04 PM. Reason: add on
          "all the mets road wins against the dodgers this year have occured at Dodger Stadium"---Ralph Kiner

          "Blind people came to the park just to listen to him pitch"---Reggie Jackson, talking about Tom Seaver

          Comment


          • #6
            I've voted for Hebner, Foster, and Bonilla because each, in his own way was a jerk in addition to being a disappointment. I was very surprised that they brought back Foster for the final game at Shea. As far as I could tell, he didn't talk to anyone.

            A lot of the guys on this list were just disappointments and a few of them were trying very hard. He was never my favorite Met and I don't like what he said about not being devastated after losing the last game of the 2007 season, but I don't understand why anyone would put Glavine on their list.

            An interesting category of least favorite Mets were Mets we didn't like even though they were, for the most part, successful players for the team. In this category, I'd put McReynolds, Kingman, and Benitez.
            sigpic Please check out my book, Mets Fan
            Please check out my blog, Mets Fan Blog
            Read about my new book The Last Days of Shea

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ralph Zig Tyko
              It occurs to me that none of the early year Mets are mentioned. I'd like to add Ed Kranepool to the list. He was soooo bad for soooo long...
              RE: no early Mets. Indeed, there aren't. Growing up in the 70's, I cannot recall a player being disliked and booed. I'm too young for the 60's, but I've never heard mention of a player that was booed from that era. As far as I know, we all popped our boo cherry on George Foster. I'ld be interested to know from someone who was there for the first 10 years if any player was ever subject to sustained booing and constant negative press, or just general all around fan loathing.

              Steady Eddie wasn't great for sure - but we loved him.
              Last edited by whoisonit; 11-20-2008, 04:17 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Bonilla, Mota and #3 Rickey for the way he dogged it through that second season with the Mets. Every time you'ld see him half jogging out another DP grounder I'd hate him a little more. Lack of talent I can understand, effort never. Which is why some of the current crew are so irksome.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I put down Vince Coleman (I'm surprised there were no more votes for the malcontent, underperforming, firecracker-throwing, whining SOB who dissed Jackie Robinson as saying "he did nothing for me!"), Mel Rojas (you could almost put down money that he'd come in and blow the game...WAY moreso than Aaron Heilman), and Guillermo Mota (basically because he came to represent everything that was wrong with the 2007 Mets' pitching). But I could've put down more. Bobby Bonilla comes in a VERY close fourth. Mo Vaughn because half the time he didn't even bother to try field the ball at first and because his physical conditioning consisted of 1) roiding and 2) eating too much, though at the time, we merely thought it was the latter. He is also one of only three players my father booed at a Mets game (Heilman and Mota were the other two). Aaron Heilman is up there, too.

                  As for "we didn't boo our own players in the early years," my Dad sold beer at Shea in 1968 and 1969. Oh, there were players who got booed. Ed Kranepool. Cal Koonce was disliked (probably because he wasn't on the same planet as literally any of the other pitchers on the team). J.C. Martin before that hit in 1969 got booed unmercifully. Bobby Heise. Don Bosch. Another guy who my Dad recalls being booed from simply attending games was Duke Carmel in the early 1960's, though he never really understood why. In the early 1970's, Don Hahn got the heck booed out of him.

                  Kaz Matsui, Braden Looper, and Victor Zambrano may have been emblematic of certain problems, but it was difficult to actually hate them. It was clear that they tried...they just stunk. And I don't think Anthony Young was deserving of hatred at all. The guy was a league average pitcher who had horrendously bad luck.
                  "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                  -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                  Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ralph Zig Tyko
                    It occurs to me that none of the early year Mets are mentioned. I'd like to add Ed Kranepool to the list. He was soooo bad for soooo long...
                    I was around in the early years, although I was a kid. My memory of those years is that we didn't have terrifically high standards. The adults were happy to have National League baseball back and everyone kind of got into rooting for the admittedly mediocre Mets. I don't remember anyone other than Don Bosch getting booed consistently (the poor guy was way over-hyped and then he stunk). I remember being terribly disappointed by the fact that Kranepool never got any better, but I don't actually remember him being booed. That doesn't mean he wasn't, though.

                    People who are interested in how we reacted to disappointing players back in the Kranepool era might enjoy my piece, "Eddie Kranepool," which is in my book, Mets Fan:

                    EDDIE KRANEPOOL

                    What kind of memories do I have of Eddie Kranepool? What kind of memories do you have of Eddie Kranepool? All of us over a certain age have a sense that Eddie Kranepool is as much a part of the history of the franchise as Mr. Met. He was a Met for 18 years, far longer than anyone else. Memories of Eddie Kranepool must be an important part of being a Mets fan. What do you remember? We loved Eddie Kranepool. Why? It wasn’t because he was good. It wasn’t because he was nice or interesting. It was because he was a kind of tradition. Okay. What kind of tradition?

                    Well, he played for us in the very first year of the team, at the age of 17. He didn’t play much, about two games I think, but it seems to me that you would hear about him as an important part of the Met’s future. I’m not sure why they thought this. In retrospect it seems very hard to imagine that anyone could ever have looked at Eddie Kranepool and thought that he would hit .300 or hit 40 home runs or anything. But maybe that’s just because we know what happened. Or what didn’t happen.

                    Eddie didn’t happen. But he didn’t exactly not happen either. He played well enough to survive in the major leagues for 18 years, but he never had a successful season as a full-fledged regular on the team. That’s pretty amazing when you think about it. He was a regular for a while. He had success after a while. It’s just that the two things didn’t happen at the same time, as you might have expected them to.

                    Eddie didn’t do anything like he was supposed to. He was like a grouchy toy robot that a kid can’t get to operate correctly. Eddie wasn’t handsome, but you had a sense that he was supposed to be. That is to say that he had black hair and a square head and a square jaw. He was close enough to that 1960s Superman look. He had a nice sort of chucklehead smile, but he reserved it for when he was being photographed, with a bat. He looked more at ease on a baseball card than on the field.

                    So the Yankees had Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris and we had Eddie Kranepool. How come theirs worked and ours didn’t? The one we got even had a weird name.

                    But like the stubborn kid who has gotten shortchanged, we preferred the one we ended up with. We hugged him and encouraged him. We cheered his meager triumphs. He was ours. He’d hit .250, with numbing regularity, and he’d normally break into the double digits for home runs. Surly as he was, he expected our approval when he did his great deeds. We gave it up for him.

                    Eventually we got the other one too, the one who was equally funny-named and disappointing. They were our two sluggers, our two bright hopes for the future. Kranepool and Swoboda. Now if we could only get some pitching.

                    When the pitching came and Hodges came, Eddie and Ron got to be part of the real big story. It’s always a surprise to realize that they were still around when the Mets got good. You want even more of a surprise? Eddie was still around when the Mets got bad again. He was like the thing that wouldn’t leave. He was like the Wandering Jew. He had several lifetimes, none of them entirely satisfying. Everyone else would come and go. Not Eddie. Nobody ever talked about trading him. It was like he wasn’t an actual player who could play on another team. He was just part of the Mets.

                    Eddie got better after we had given up on him. After he stayed stuck through the sixties and was sent down to the minors, and eventually was resurrected as the less interesting half of a platoon, he got better. At least his statistics improved. But that may have been because he didn’t have to hit all kinds of pitching. He never became a power hitter. He was an okay first baseman. One year he hit .280 and then there was a year when after all the smoke cleared, there was a .323 next to his name and no one could figure out how it got there.

                    Eddie at the end became a distinguished pinch hitter. It was great when he came to the plate, and we could shout “Ed-die! Ed-die!” As the clouds darkened as the seventies waned, it livened things up towards the end of a game.

                    Eddie was more the Mets than anyone else. He was a beloved disappointment. An incompetent who became indispensable. He wasn’t good, but he was filled with surprises. And after you got used to the fact that he wouldn’t do anything much, you would see him come to the plate, and you would cheer him and then he would stroke a beautiful single into right and win the ball game for you.
                    sigpic Please check out my book, Mets Fan
                    Please check out my blog, Mets Fan Blog
                    Read about my new book The Last Days of Shea

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I should note that Kranepool was mostly booed in the late 1960's-early 1970's. Beats me as to why. It actually subsided in the mid 1970's, even with what I like to call the second generation of Mets fans (those born during the eary 1960's), possibly because people came to recognize just how much Kranepool was a metaphor for the Mets themselves.
                      "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                      -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                      Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dalkowski110 View Post
                        I put down Vince Coleman (I'm surprised there were no more votes for the malcontent, underperforming, firecracker-throwing, whining SOB who dissed Jackie Robinson as saying "he did nothing for me!").
                        For sheer unpleasantness and failure to live up to expectations, Vince was top of my list. Bonilla and Roberto Alomar also made my list for the same reasons.

                        Rojas was dreadful, and I certainly booed him, but the glazed look in his eyes inspired a kind of pity that leaves him lower down the list.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dalkowski110 View Post
                          I put down . . . Mel Rojas (you could almost put down money that he'd come in and blow the game...WAY moreso than Aaron Heilman), and Guillermo Mota ....
                          I'm genuenly shocked the Rojas isn't getting more support. Brutal. He was brutal. I struggled with whether or not to choose him as my Honorable Mention guy. I figured I would toss out a gratuitous insult to Glavine, who I despised, because most others would jump all over Mel like nearly every batter he faced once did. If Hielman had replaced Rojas, yesterday we would have renamed the Triborough the Hielman Crossing.

                          As for "we didn't boo our own players in the early years," my Dad sold beer at Shea in 1968 and 1969. Oh, there were players who got booed. Ed Kranepool. Cal Koonce was disliked (probably because he wasn't on the same planet as literally any of the other pitchers on the team). J.C. Martin before that hit in 1969 got booed unmercifully. Bobby Heise. Don Bosch. Another guy who my Dad recalls being booed from simply attending games was Duke Carmel in the early 1960's, though he never really understood why. In the early 1970's, Don Hahn got the heck booed out of him.
                          This I did not know - but Hahn ? I don't recall him ever being booed.

                          Kaz Matsui, Braden Looper, and Victor Zambrano may have been emblematic of certain problems, but it was difficult to actually hate them. It was clear that they tried...they just stunk. And I don't think Anthony Young was deserving of hatred at all. The guy was a league average pitcher who had horrendously bad luck.
                          I never got the hatred twords Kaz. I liked him. He tried. I thought he was treated unfairly. I've followed him and been happy for his successes since leaving. Looper - ugh. He's high on my list. Victor Zambrano is one of the more tragic figures in Met's history. Such a horrible misfortune to have become a symbol of mismanagement - it' not his fault he was traded for Kazmir. He proved himself to be a sincere, caring, even honorable man when he apologised for his poor play when he had his devestating injury. I don't know how anyone with an ounce of compassion could not feel for this man, regardless of his record and the trade. Anthony Young - a lovable loser in true Met lovable loser tradition.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ralph Zig Tyko
                            Eddie not handsome? Don't be catty, young man. :-)
                            When I was very, very tiny, I thought he and Herman Munster we the same guy.
                            Now that I think about it, has anyone ever produced of picture of Eddie and Fred Gywnn together ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Has any Met ever gone from liked to loathed more than Roger Cedeño?

                              In his second go-round with the team, the porked-up Roger came in for much deserved razzing as he butchered balls in the outfield.

                              Comment

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