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  • #76
    I loved that beautiful lilting waltz tune in the old Rheingold Beer commercials. The sound of it in my head brings back the old days of the Mets more than just about anything. Do you happen to know of anyplace on the Web where you can get the audiofile? On my book website, I wanted three pieces of music: 1) the original "Meet the Mets" with all the verses. I did find that; 2) the "My Beer is Rheingold the Dry Beer" song, which I haven't found yet; and 3) the recording of the "Flag of Victory" march that was used by Ralph Kiner as the theme music for "Kiner's Korner." I've found several recordings of "Flag of Victory," but I haven't found the actual "Kiner's Korner" music. If anyone could post links to either of these last two, I would be very grateful.

    http://metsfanbook.com
    sigpic Please check out my book, Mets Fan
    Please check out my blog, Mets Fan Blog
    Read about my new book The Last Days of Shea

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    • #77
      Originally posted by metsfanbook.com View Post
      I loved that beautiful lilting waltz tune in the old Rheingold Beer commercials. The sound of it in my head brings back the old days of the Mets more than just about anything. Do you happen to know of anyplace on the Web where you can get the audiofile? On my book website, I wanted three pieces of music: 1) the original "Meet the Mets" with all the verses. I did find that; 2) the "My Beer is Rheingold the Dry Beer" song, which I haven't found yet; and 3) the recording of the "Flag of Victory" march that was used by Ralph Kiner as the theme music for "Kiner's Korner." I've found several recordings of "Flag of Victory," but I haven't found the actual "Kiner's Korner" music. If anyone could post links to either of these last two, I would be very grateful.

      http://metsfanbook.com
      As far as the rheingold beer song there are plenty of 1962 and 1963 new york mets games that still exist today on audio tape. many of these games have the original commercials including the rheingold beer commercials during the game.
      LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

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      • #78
        1962 Topps Casey Stengel

        Here is a 1962 Topps Casey Stengel card
        Attached Files
        LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

        Comment


        • #79
          1962 Topps Jay Hook

          Here is a 1962 topps Jay Hook card
          Attached Files
          LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

          Comment


          • #80


            We have Casey Stengel's card up there, but I figured I'd add a few. Note that Don Zimmer, the Mets first of many third basemen, had already been traded to the Reds by the time the card was printed! Ken McKenzie, the only 1962 Mets pitcher with a winning record (5-4), wears a Milwaukee Braves uniform. On the bottom row, Sammy Drake, who was basically Herb Washington with good baseball knowledge, wears a Cubs uniform. Roger Craig, the first Mets ace pitcher, wears a Dodgers uniform. Gus Bell, a laregly forgotten original Met, wears the uniform of the Cincinnati Reds. The middle may be recognized as a bit of a joke to some people. Richie Ashburn, one of the team's few legitimate all-around players, kept having problems with Elio Chacon (left wearing a Reds uniform) coming out at short or second (his primary positions). Well, Joe Christopher told him Elio couldn't speak any English. "He speaks Spanish, and 'I got it' in Spanish is 'Yo la tengo'." When Ashburn ggot his next fly ball, he shouted "Yo la tengo! Yo la tengo!" and Chacon stopped. Then Chacon said something that Ashburn didn't understand. However, he likely soon found out what he meant as Frank Thomas (right), an early Mets power hitter, slammed into him and bowled him over because he didn't hear "I got it."
            "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
            -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

            Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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            • #81
              1962ToppsCannizzaro.JPG

              Here's Chris Cannizzaro's 1962 Topps card. Cannizzaro's best seasons would come much later in his career with the Padres, and while he was once an All-Star, he never quite lived up to the expectations everyone had for him.
              "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
              -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

              Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

              Comment


              • #82
                1962ToppsChrisleyandRightyMiller.JPG

                Neil Chrisley and Righty Bob Miller.

                Neil Chrisley was a total bust, even by 1962 Mets standards. A power-hitting infielder in the mid-Minors, Chrisley struggled with hitting the breaking ball at a AAA level. The Mets had high hopes for him, as the back of his card (remember, they actually tried writing interesting stuff on the backs of 1950's, 1960's, and 1970's Topps cards) would indicate, but he never played a game in a Mets uniform. Righty Bob Miller was the better of the two Bob Millers, with Lefty Bob being pretty terrible. Righty Bob went 1-12 with an abysmal 4.89 ERA, but rebounded the next season as a swingman with the LA Dodgers. Ironically, he came back and finished his career with the Mets in 1973 and 1974, though didn't make a playoff or World Series appearance in '73, having only pitched one game and being ineligible. His 1974 stats actually had him pegged as a good reliever...with a 3.58 ERA slightly below league average.
                "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                Comment


                • #83
                  RickHerrscher.JPG

                  Rick Herrscher was the 1962 Mets only real shortstop prospect (in the true sense of the word). However, much like Neil Chrisley, Herrscher struggled with hitting breaking balls (and being a free-swinger didn't help), though he was a good defender (except at third base, where he made two errors). He could also field first base very well (and this, surprisingly, translated into MLB). Because of this, he came to the Majors for 35 games. In fifty at-bats, he got just 11 hits, including 3 doubles and a homerun. He had six RBI's and scored five runs. He also drew five walks, and struck out 11 times. Initially the property of the Baltimore Orioles, Herrscher was highly touted everywhere he went. However, after his 35 game trip to the Majors in 1962 with the woeful Mets, the right-handed-hitting third baseman never emerged from the Minors again.
                  "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                  -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                  Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    1962ToppsMets2.JPG

                    Hobie Landrith was the Mets second pick of their expansion draft. When asked why he picked Hobie Landrith, Casey Stengel replied "Well, you need a catcher." Though a weak hitter, Landrith had, at least in the past, been a good defender behind the plate. However, he was dreadful, even by 1962 Mets standards, with a fielding percentage of just .968 in his 21 games with the original team. Landrith was shipped off for for an Orioles first baseman on June 7th. The first baseman's name? Marv Throneberry.

                    Harry Chiti is here pictured with the Cleveland Indians (and actually wearing a Detroit Tigers uniform), but I chose to include him as Landrith's even-worse successor for a number of reasons. First, Chiti never appeared with the Mets on a baseball card. And second, how the Mets got him is a great story. Well, the Mets traded for Chiti (a one-time power hitter for the Cubs and A's) for a player to be named later. After going 8-for-41 at the plate in 15 games (with a .971 fielding percentage), the Mets had seen enough. The player to be named later the Mets traded for Harry Chiti turned out to be Chiti himself, who was quickly released by the Indians. He thus became the only player in history to be traded for himself.

                    Jim Marshall, a first baseman, couldn't be more different than the two pitiful catchers I've just talked about. Some say Casey Stengel didn't like him (indeed, he was a headstrong player who later became a manager). Others say the Mets just didn't know what on earth was going on. But Marshall was batting .344/.400/.656 and fielding 1.000 when the Mets traded him for Vinegar Bend Mizell, the washed up pitcher who would later become a US Representative. While Marshall posted poor BA and SLG numbers with the Pirates, he had a good OBP relative to his BA. After that stint with the Pirates, the 31-year-old slugger was done. Perhaps it was because he came up as a 27-year-old rookie, and rookies over 25 rarely lasted in the Majors back then unless they were VERY talented.
                    "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                    -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                    Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Rick Herrscher

                      Originally posted by Dalkowski110 View Post
                      [ATTACH]25366[/ATTACH]

                      Rick Herrscher was the 1962 Mets only real shortstop prospect (in the true sense of the word). However, much like Neil Chrisley, Herrscher struggled with hitting breaking balls (and being a free-swinger didn't help), though he was a good defender (except at third base, where he made two errors). He could also field first base very well (and this, surprisingly, translated into MLB). Because of this, he came to the Majors for 35 games. In fifty at-bats, he got just 11 hits, including 3 doubles and a homerun. He had six RBI's and scored five runs. He also drew five walks, and struck out 11 times. Initially the property of the Baltimore Orioles, Herrscher was highly touted everywhere he went. However, after his 35 game trip to the Majors in 1962 with the woeful Mets, the right-handed-hitting third baseman never emerged from the Minors again.
                      Rick Herrscher had his first hit on 8-5-1962 in the Cincinnati at New York Mets game at the Polo Grounds.it was a homerun off of reds pitcher Jim O'Toole.
                      LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Gil Hodges

                        One of the hilites for the mets during the 1962 season was when Gil Hodges hit 3 homeruns in the holiday doubleheader on May 30 1962 at the polo grounds vs the Los Angeles Dodgers.the mets did lose both games of the DH.
                        Attached Files
                        LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Marvelous Marv Throneberry

                          Originally posted by donzblock View Post
                          Throneberry failing to touch first and second base on his way to a "triple."
                          Allegedly, manager Casey Stengel told First Base Coach Solly Hemus to argue the call against Marvelous Marv for missing first. Hemus allegedly answered, "Don't bother, he missed second base, too." As for Marv Throneberry's alleged incompetence in the field, it was more legend than fact. His range and fielding percentage was about average for a first baseman in his career. As a matter of fact, he would sometimes be used as a defensive relacement in late innings for Bill Skowron when he was with the Yankees.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Marv Throneberry

                            Originally posted by Barry G. Disbrow View Post
                            Allegedly, manager Casey Stengel told First Base Coach Solly Hemus to argue the call against Marvelous Marv for missing first. Hemus allegedly answered, "Don't bother, he missed second base, too." As for Marv Throneberry's alleged incompetence in the field, it was more legend than fact. His range and fielding percentage was about average for a first baseman in his career. As a matter of fact, he would sometimes be used as a defensive relacement in late innings for Bill Skowron when he was with the Yankees.
                            That mistake by throneberry cost the mets the game. they lost by one run to chicago. also in that game Lou Brock hit his homerun into the rightfield bleachers at the Polo Grounds. i just listened to this game on audio tape last week.
                            LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Charlie Neal

                              Here is the 1962 Topps card for Charlie Neal of the Mets.he is one of a handfull of former brooklyn dodgers who played for the mets during there 2 year stay at the historic polo grounds.
                              Attached Files
                              LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Felix Mantilla

                                Here is the 1962 topps card for mets infielder Felix Mantilla.
                                Attached Files
                                LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

                                Comment

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