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Kiner's Korner

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  • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    Here's a Kiner's Korner I haven't seen in a long time. It was the game where Bill Gullickson threw at Gary Carter's head, and Dwight Gooden retaliated. I remember watching that game live. Gooden, Carter and George Foster are the guests. We also see ten of Gooden's strikeouts. This was July 30th, 1985.



    Anybody else remember this game?
    I do not remember that game, but thank you for posting it. It was awesome to watch.

    A few things:

    1) Every team I hear that Kiners Korner opening music it takes me way back. Great stuff.
    2) Everyone trying to keep a straight face when Gooden said the pitch to Gullickson got away from him.
    3) Hubie Brooks was befuddled on that curve wasnt he?
    4) Herm Winningham was out classed on the curve balls
    5) Although not with the Mets --- Foster was a monster hitter. He was ok with the Mets but a monster with the Reds.

    I could go on because that era just brings back so many memories.

    Thanks again

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Paulypal View Post
      Every team I hear that Kiners Korner opening music it takes me way back.
      Time to take a little trip...



      X

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post

        Time to take a little trip...


        LOL -- great stuff. Thank you

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Paulypal View Post

          LOL -- great stuff. Thank you
          I read this whole thread, before I made my most recent post. There are a lot of great posts from posters that are no longer here. Some fans have never posted in this Mets forum before or since. I was distributing "likes" liberally. Below is one of my favorites from Dana Brand:


          Originally posted by metsfanbook View Post
          Here's what I wrote about my memories of Kiner's Korner, which I loved for the same bizarre reasons as everyone else. This is from my book, Mets Fan (McFarland, 2007).

          RALPH KINER

          The old Mets’ TV post-game show, “Kiner’s Corner,” would begin, remember, with music that sounded like something a German band would play at an Oktoberfest. It was the wrong kind of music for a show like this, but hey, it was Ralph’s show and Ralph was Ralph and it was all right for that reason. When the music faded, you’d see Ralph sitting in a chair, with that way he had of looking like he was completely at home and yet had just been beamed down from Mars and was still getting his bearings. A ballplayer would be in the other chair. Ralph didn’t seem completely aware of why the ballplayer was there but he recognized that it was his obligation to make the player feel comfortable. So Ralph would ask a question at the end of which you could not possibly justify putting a question mark. The player would listen and then, when he finally realized that the question mark was not coming, he would start talking. He would usually say something about expecting a fastball because the pitcher had thrown him a curve ball on the two previous pitches and it was a fastball and high and inside and he got a piece of it and he was glad that whatever happened happened.

          Ralph, without betraying or expressing his emotions in any way, would always wait until the player stopped talking before he began asking his next question. The player, who knew this time that a question mark was not coming, just as he had known that the curveball was not coming, was now more at ease and he would launch right into his next disquisition about the pitch he expected and the pitches the pitcher threw and blah blah blah. After Ralph did this three or four more times, the show would end and you would hear the bratwurst music again.

          It was a great show. There was something hypnotic about it. I don’t think Ralph was on the sauce, as some have suggested. But I also don’t think he hosted Kiner’s Korner the way he did on purpose. Lindsey Nelson and Bob Murphy did and said what they did on purpose. Ralph just happened. That was his charm.

          A lot of times Ralph would open his mouth and words would just fall out of them. Fathers on Fathers’ Day were all wished a Happy Birthday. Current ballplayers would briefly borrow the names of ballplayers who hadn’t played for thirty years. And we would learn things like the fact that the Mets had a good road record when they played at Dodger Stadium.

          Still, as funny as he could be, Ralph isn’t and wasn’t a comic figure. He has presence. He is the guy who comes along, who sits in the back seat and doesn’t call attention to himself. You talk with him a little to be polite and you find out, always to your amazement, that he was one of the greatest home run hitters who ever lived, that he knew everyone who ever played, that he has a deep, inner knowledge of the workings of the game, and that he’s slept with half of the women who still get you excited in great American films of the 1950s. What are you supposed to make of an existence like Ralph Kiner’s? How could someone hit all those home runs, know so much about baseball, sleep with Ava Gardner, and still be Ralph Kiner? Quick, imagine Ava Gardner on Kiner’s Korner. Something close to this may have actually happened. And all you can do is imagine it. He remembers it. I think. Imagine what Ralph Kiner’s memories must look like.

          After a while, you realize that this humble, relaxed man really is who he says he is. You realize how smart and witty he is, without apparent effort or even intention. You end up loving him, and needing him to be there, but you still don’t know where to put him. You can understand why you loved Bob Murphy because he was a great announcer and he had his uniquely generous and hopeful view of the universe. Lindsey Nelson, with his thirties voice and seventies jackets, was an accomplished showman. Gary Cohen and Howie Rose are the new style of great announcers, articulate professionals. What is Ralph? He’s just somebody you couldn’t have made up and you’ve come to love. He is like the soul of old baseball, from a time when people were characters and life was an adventure, even for those who weren’t adventurous. As Ralph slips away, I know I am losing something. I still want to hear his voice, even with the palsy. I can still understand him. I need to continue to know that his world really existed.

          Ralph threw out the first pitch at the second NLDS playoff game in 2006. I saw him from my seat way up in the upper deck. He had on a bright yellow sweater. But even at that enormous distance, you could tell it was Ralph. You could tell by the way he ambled, by how big and solid his head and his body were. There he was, so far away and so familiar. Throwing the ball to the catcher. Sort of. And then walking off the field.
          Great.

          But there are other super posts, and links to Kiner's Korners. I found reading it all at once very enjoyable. As a ten year thread, it's accumulated a lot of great reminiscences. Let me know if anyone agrees.


          "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

            I read this whole thread, before I made my most recent post. There are a lot of great posts from posters that are no longer here. Some fans have never posted in this Mets forum before or since. I was distributing "likes" liberally. Below is one of my favorites from Dana Brand:




            Great.

            But there are other super posts, and links to Kiner's Korners. I found reading it all at once very enjoyable. As a ten year thread, it's accumulated a lot of great reminiscences. Let me know if anyone agrees.
            That was a great post by Dana.

            Ralph was one of kind, and glad he was associated with the Mets. I dont care how many times he called Gary Carter --- Gary Cooper. It was Ralph Kiner.

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