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  • Why the Mets

    I'm interested in the hows and whys for people becoming Mets fans, perhaps or in particular, versus becoming Yankee fans.

    For me the Murcer Yankees were just uninteresting to my little kid mind wheras the Mets had Tom Seaver, Rusty Staub, Cleon Jones, and perhaps most important, Willie Mays. Then along came 1973 and the deal was sealed.

  • #2
    My dad was a Yankee fan until 1967 when he started to root for the Mets. He's been a Met fan since. I went to a lot of games at Shea so I saw the Mets more than the Yankees. I kinda liked both the Yankees until 1999 since all of my friends were Yankee fans. Then in 99 I started to root for the Mets and have been a fan since.

    I hate the "win the World Series every year. Sign every good player available" mentality of most Yankee fans.
    "I'm happy for [Edwin Encarnacion] because this guy bleeds internally, big-time" -Dusty Baker

    "If on-base percentage is so important, then why don't they put it on the scoreboard?" -Jeff Francoeur

    "At the end of the day, the sun comes up and I still have a job" -Joba Chamberlain

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    • #3
      Originally posted by NYMets523 View Post
      I hate the "win the World Series every year. Sign every good player available" mentality of most Yankee fans.
      Ditto on that

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      • #4
        Well, I guess it all started with my great great grandfather, a fan of the 1880's New York Giants under Jim Mutrie with stars such as Buck Ewing and Tim Keefe also on that team. Still, aside from which players he really liked (Ewing, Keefe, and manager Jim Mutrie), we don't know much about his being a fan*. His son (my great grandfather), too, was a New York Giants fan. His most exciting moment, as he told my grandfather, was when the Baltimore Orioles let John McGraw, Joe McGinnity, Roger Bresnahan, and Dan McGann (whom he apparently liked) all go to the Giants. Of course, he also remembered very well the non-Orioles stars like Christy Mathewson (his favorite player) and Rube Marquard, and he also would attend Brooklyn Superbas games to watch Zack Wheat, whom he thought well of. When the Orioles moved to NY to become the Highlanders, he actually looked down on them. When they came into the Polo Grounds, I believe he referred to them as "that bunch of carpet-baggers." Believe me when I say that that mentality of outright disdain for the Yankees was passed down. His son, my grandfather, was yet another Giants fan.

        My grandfather's first ever game he saw in-person was Carl Hubbell's perfect game in 1929 (we have the ticket stubs with the date). From then on, Hubbell was my grandfather's favorite pitcher. He liked Frankie Frisch, Freddie Lindstrom, and Travis "Stonewall" Jackson a great deal, as well as Freddie Fitzsimmons, Hal Schmacher, and most of the rest of the 1930's New York Giants pitching staff.

        My Dad, born in 1946, remembers the decade of the 1950's extremely well and remembers clear as day the first game he went to. It was Giants vs. Dodgers, and Ruben Gomez was going for the Giants while Carl Erskine started for the Dodgers. Erskine really got lit up and the Giants won something like 13-5 (Dad remembers George "Shotgun" Shuba pinch-hitting in the top of the 9th to give the Dodgers an extra run with a solo homer on the first pitch he saw).

        Like his father and grandfather, Dad was not at all averse to the Brooklyn Dodgers. In fact, he cheered for them when they didn't play the Giants, probably because he grew up in the Bronx and knew precisely one other National League fan...who was a Dodgers fan. I would almost say that both Dad and this other guy were almost more New York National League fans than Giants or Dodgers fans.

        Dad tried rooting for the Giants when they moved out west, but found it impossible to really keep up with the team. In late 1958, he tried becoming a Phillies fan. That didn't work when they traded his favorite player on the team, Richie Ashburn. From the time Ashburn was traded until the Mets came along, Dad would merely root for whatever club made the World Series or the NL during All-Star Games. When the Mets came around in 1962, Dad picked right up where he left off in terms of being a fan. He also was a beer vendor at Shea from 1967-1969 (and could offer quite a few interesting anecdotes, like when the eight guys from a fraternity sitting in the nosebleed seats down the left field line kept tipping my Dad with $20 bills and even a $50 bill when they were so drunk they couldn't tell the difference).

        With Dad a devoted Mets fan and Mom a devoted Detroit Tigers fan since the early 1950's, it was pretty obvious I'd avoid the Yankees (Mom's most hated team until divisional play came in, when they were second only to the Twins) and follow both of my parents in terms of which teams to root for.

        *Actually, we do have one detail of my great great grandfather's fanhood for the Giants. He explained to his son the rallying cry of the late 1880's Giants, which was "We are the people!" When my great grandfather tried mimicking it, his father quickly corrected him. "No, son, you put the emphasis on 'the', not 'are'." I'm not sure how that survived, exactly, or why it was remembered, but it was.
        Last edited by Dalkowski110; 04-08-2009, 01:44 PM.
        "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
        -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

        Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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        • #5
          My pop was a Marine Corp officer and Mike Jorgenson was his radio operator at Camp Lejeune during reserve training circa 1971.

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          • #6
            My dad was a lifelong New York Giants fan. He lived in the Bronx but did not root for the Yankess. He did attend Yankess games, though, and saw Don Larsen's World Series perfect game.

            When the Mets were created in 1961, he took me to the groundbreaking ceremonies for Shea Stadium. There, I met Gil Hodges, who the Mets had picked in the expansion draft.

            I saw the Mets in a few games at the Polo Grounds, and have been a Mets fan ever since.

            Mets Fan Since 1962

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            • #7
              "What a GREAT lineage!!"

              Thanks!
              "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
              -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

              Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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              • #8
                My dad grew up in Brooklyn in the 50's It was always obvious to me how he was a Dodgers fan, but never occurred to me until this very second to ask how his brother (my uncle) became a Yankees fan. I'm guessing he was swayed by all the Championships.

                Whether it was his brother being a Yankees fan or the Yankees constantly beating the Dodgers, my father always had a strong dislike for anything Yankees, which he past on to me.

                My father was one of the few Dodgers fans to continue to follow them when they went to the west coast. When I was growing up in NJ in the 70's and 80's, the only way to watch out of market teams were the Saturday game of the week, or when they played the Mets or Phillies. I remember when I was young if the Dodgers were on Saturday, it was an event in my house. and we'd always go to at least one game each time the Dodgers were at Shea.

                He also rooted for the Mets, mostly because he loved baseball and wanted a local team to root for. Growing up, I was a fan of both the Dodgers and Mets, but over time it became easier to follow the local team, and my alligence was purely to the Mets.

                To answer the original question of how I chose the Mets over the Yankees, rooting for the Yankees was never an option for me

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                • #9
                  My grandma was a Dodger fan who lived in Queens up until 1958. Her house was a 15 minute walk to Shea, and is now a 15 minute walk to Citi. So she passed the fanhood down to my father (who really wasn't into baseball until I got into it in '06). I've been a lifelong Mets fan but I really got into it in '06 when the Mets started to dominate.
                  "You're killin' me Smalls!"

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                  • #10
                    I was 7 and I liked the uniforms. When my aunt took me to see a Yankees Twins game in 1967, it was a gray day and a boring game. The Mets just seemed "brighter" and more fun to a little kid. I also liked the blue and orange tiles on the Stadium when we went past Shea on the way to visit my Aunt who lived in Forest Hills. What can I say?

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                    • #11
                      My dad was a Brooklyn Dodgers fan, so like many of them, switching to the Mets was easy. One of my earliest memories is a game at Shea Stadium. It must have been 1972 (I was 4 1/2) as Tommy Agee was still playing for the Mets (he was my favorite player back then) but Gil Hodges had just died (I remember my mother being very sad).
                      Let's go Mets!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
                        I'm interested in the hows and whys for people becoming Mets fans, perhaps or in particular, versus becoming Yankee fans.

                        For me the Murcer Yankees were just uninteresting to my little kid mind wheras the Mets had Tom Seaver, Rusty Staub, Cleon Jones, and perhaps most important, Willie Mays. Then along came 1973 and the deal was sealed.
                        May 24, 1970 I was 8 years old, and went there with my Cub Scout troop from Levittown LI. Cubs @ Mets scheduled double dip (ironically May 24th is my oldest son's birthday), and I was hooked from then on. As I always say being a Mets fan is more of a disease than anything else
                        sigpic
                        LETS GO METS !!!

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                        • #13
                          Here in Milan, Italy, there are 2 big and worldwide famous soccer teams, Milan and Inter. I support Inter, despite the lack of important wins in the last decades. I love New York and I love underdogs. I loved the epic saga of the 1969 Miracle Mets. So, here I am, a Met fan. No doubt about my choice

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                          • #14
                            my grandfather was a NY Giants fan, then when they left town, and the mets moved in, he became fan of theirs. Then years, years, later, i just followed the tradition and became raised as a mets fan.
                            NL Wild Card
                            1999 2000

                            NL East Division Champs
                            1969 1973 1986 1988 2006

                            National League Champs
                            1969 1973 1986 2000

                            World Champs
                            1969 1986

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                            • #15
                              Heredity, I guess. My father was a Mets fan and had been a Brooklyn Dodgers fan. His father was a small business owner in Brooklyn and was very friendly with Dodgers players and was, of course, a fan also. In those days, players were part of the community; it's hard to imagine now.

                              There's a fine picture of me at 3 years of age, standing with my father in front of Shea, which I enjoy looking at sometimes. Shea looked magnificent. I always took offense at those that would badmouth that beautiful ballpark.

                              When I was 9, my best friend and his brother and father were Yankees fans, and there was the temptation to go the wrong way, but I remained stalwart.

                              I like the image that the Mets traditionally had: the anti-Yankees; the underdog. This made it especially satisfying when they would win and added a special shine to their mid-80s run.

                              As you all know, it hasn't always been easy, but the peaks have more than made up for the valleys.


                              "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

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