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  • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    There are at least a couple Wilpon events to report recently.

    Noah Syndergaard mentioned the idiocy of bringing the Mets all the way to Syracuse to "work out". Of course now that Fred owns the Syracuse AAA franchise, he's eager to do what's necessary to juice attendance there. Fred notably never did anything like that with past affiliates, which was why the Mets' AAA team was a gypsy for years.
    The Mets haven't owned their AAA affiliate since they sold the Tides. When they were the Tides, the Mets would play an exhibition game mid-season down at Harbor Park - I went to one, and actually have a ticket stub somewhere. I recall the players hated, that, too. But it was done to give the fans in Hampton Roads a chance to see major league players.

    Meanwhile, Looks like Fred has bought back the shares in the Mets he sold to his cable partners.

    https://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/...ises/Mets.aspx

    The open market price was apparently depressed because nobody wanted to be Jeffy's silent partner going forward.

    Looks like that family will own the team the rest of our lives. I'm glad I was there for 1986. Going forward, I don't expect any more championships.
    The Mets aren't worth what the Wilpons think they are, so they exercised their right of first refusal when Comcast and Spectrum were looking to sell below that the Wilpons feel is fair market. No big news there. We know they weren't going to sell controlling interest.
    20-Game Saturday Plan, Prom Box 423.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by dstoffa View Post

      The Mets haven't owned their AAA affiliate since they sold the Tides. When they were the Tides, the Mets would play an exhibition game mid-season down at Harbor Park - I went to one, and actually have a ticket stub somewhere. I recall the players hated, that, too. But it was done to give the fans in Hampton Roads a chance to see major league players.



      The Mets aren't worth what the Wilpons think they are, so they exercised their right of first refusal when Comcast and Spectrum were looking to sell below that the Wilpons feel is fair market. No big news there. We know they weren't going to sell controlling interest.
      If the Mets aren't worth what the Wilpons think, it's because they've spun off the main engine of revenue - local TV - into a separate corporate entity. Outside of tech, earnings are still needed to support valuations.

      But here you're also seeing no perks from being a MLB part owner, combined with having to interact with Fred and Jeff. Not worth the price to anyone, it seems.


      "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
        There are at least a couple Wilpon events to report recently.

        Noah Syndergaard mentioned the idiocy of bringing the Mets all the way to Syracuse to "work out". Of course now that Fred owns the Syracuse AAA franchise, he's eager to do what's necessary to juice attendance there. Fred notably never did anything like that with past affiliates, which was why the Mets' AAA team was a gypsy for years.

        As a result, looks like the players will go into opening day in Washington unrested:

        https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb...UoH?li=BBnba9I

        "Mets' Trip to Syracuse a Disaster"...

        Meanwhile, Looks like Fred has bought back the shares in the Mets he sold to his cable partners.

        https://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/...ises/Mets.aspx

        The open market price was apparently depressed because nobody wanted to be Jeffy's silent partner going forward.

        Looks like that family will own the team the rest of our lives. I'm glad I was there for 1986. Going forward, I don't expect any more championships.
        Even Jeff doesn't want to be Jeff's silent partner..Sad news indeed . I've been there since the Marvelous Marv days Tom Terrific, Straw, Doc, etc..I was hoping to see a fairly well run organization that would challenge every few years. Never expected a Yankee organization but SOMETHING..

        At least I still wear my #41 Jersey..
        North of the Big Apple but missing Central Fla :atthepc

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
          But here you're also seeing no perks from being a MLB part owner, combined with having to interact with Fred and Jeff. Not worth the price to anyone, it seems.
          It's all about ROI.

          I was skiing in Aspen this winter, and my mates and I were discussing real estate. We had rented an early 60's ranch-style home in town. It was dated, but comfortable. You could tell by the architecture how old the home was. It's valued at 2.1 million dollars. We said to ourselves, "That's crazy!" Now, why is it valued so much? And what do you do with it?

          To be worth while, you need to make, say, 8 percent on your investment. That means by renting the property, you need a profit of $168,000. That's clearing $14,000 per month. You still need to maintain the home and pay property taxes on it, not to mention taxes on the rental income. Nobody would pay $20,000 per month to rent that house. But that is what you need to charge to make it a worth while investment. So the value in the home is pretty much in the futures. Tear down the 60's ranch and build a new, modern home, sell it for $8 million. There is no money to be made renting it unless you bought it 40 years ago. You can't make note payments on the rental income. It could help, but in the end, if you have capital to invest, there are better places.

          Same goes for these cable companies. There are better places for them to invest their money. Owning a baseball team is not that place. It's also not part of their core business. Spectrum and Comcast still own their shares of SNY, and you're right, that's where the money is made. Whatever profit the netowrk makes, the Wilpons get 65%, Spectrum gets 27%, and Comcast 8%. They stepped in to help the Wilpons out when the their own stake (in the Network) was in jeopardy, just like Mario Lemieux stepped in to save the Penguins to ensure that all his deferred pay would still come his way. Does being part owner of the Mets make them money? I am sure it does, but not enough.
          20-Game Saturday Plan, Prom Box 423.

          Comment


          • Years ago, I remember reading that Fred and Jeff were too cheap to commission studies on wind currents before building Coupon Field. Well...



            https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb...hem/ar-BBVzv4p

            Even the Mets' Home Stadium Is Mocking Them
            Jared Diamond
            18 hrs ago



            The New York Mets underwent an overhaul this winter, hiring a new general manager, Brodie Van Wagenen, who promptly reshaped the roster in hopes of reversing two consecutive losing seasons. But the Mets are stuck with their biggest problem: their home ballpark, the most fearsome obstacle in all of baseball.

            Citi Field, which replaced Shea Stadium in 2009, has emerged as an almost unfathomable nightmare for anybody unfortunate enough to step into the batter’s box. The Run Destroyer of Flushing suppresses offense in ways that defy logic, crushing hitters’ production and breaking their psyches, all while leaving the Mets confounded about the cause of the problem.

            From 2012 to 2018, the organization twice brought in the outfield fences in an effort to boost scoring. Yet the Mets still rank last in the majors in home batting average (.230), OPS (.677) and runs per game (3.72) during those years. Not surprisingly, only one team, the Minnesota Twins, has a worse home winning percentage than the Mets’ .487 over that span.

            This might give the impression that the Mets simply have bad hitters, but their performance away from Queens suggests otherwise. They have the second-best road OPS in the sport over those seven seasons (.734) and the fifth-best batting average (.255), resulting in 4.5 runs a game and a .485 winning percentage. Every team posts a better record at home than on the road, but none has a smaller advantage in their own stadium than the Mets.

            “We knew it was happening, but we tried not to get caught up in it,” said Kevin Long, the Mets’ hitting coach from 2015 through 2017. “All it’s going to do is bring down the morale and demeanor of the club.”

            The Mets have taken steps to understand the situation. Under former GM Sandy Alderson, they analyzed wind patterns to see if reasonable alterations to Citi Field’s architecture would help. They looked into how they store their equipment. They even considered whether the issues stemmed from their routine, changing when players arrived to work and meal times in the clubhouse. None of those efforts yielded solutions.

            Van Wagenen and his staff studied the Citi Field dilemma this off-season, too. He declined to share what they found, but insists that the park “will give us a competitive advantage if we make the necessary adjustments.”

            “We’re excited about the players we have here and what we’re doing physically and mentally to convert this to a value-add,” Van Wagenen said.

            The Mets always planned to build a stadium that favored pitchers, only to quickly realize they went too far. The 16-foot wall in left field and the 415-foot power alley in right-center proved difficult to the point of unfair, prompting two rounds of modifications to the dimensions. Home-run output increased to reasonable levels, but it did little to improve the overall run-scoring environment.

            On balls in play that didn’t leave the yard from 2012 through 2018, the Mets own a .272 batting average at home, last in baseball. On the road, the figure soared to .302, fourth-best in MLB.

            “You’d just see balls die inexplicably,” said Adam Fisher, a Mets official until 2017.

            Mets outfielders say the wind always works against hitters at Citi Field, aggressively blowing in and toward the first-base foul line, especially on cold nights early and late in the season.

            They think it originates on Flushing Bay and then funnels through a gap between the giant center-field scoreboard and the left-field bleachers. Often, they will look up at the flags high atop the stadium and see them blowing out, yet lower down, on the field, they feel the wind gusting in. Outfielder Brandon Nimmo said the wind blows in so hard it reminds him of his hometown of Cheyenne, Wyo., one of the windiest cities in the country.

            Players say moving in the fences only exacerbated the challenge of dealing with the wind. The shorter dimensions shrank the outfield, giving defenders less room to cover and making it nearly impossible to find grass if a fly ball doesn’t reach the bleachers.

            “There’s something going on with the wind that puts up a wall, especially in center field,” outfielder Michael Conforto said.

            Fisher said that in response, the Mets tried to load up on pull hitters with power down the lines, areas unaffected by the elements. But the introduction of Statcast, baseball’s tracking tool, in 2015 revealed a more disturbing fact that the Mets still don’t understand: Balls hit at Citi Field literally come off the bat with less authority than anyplace else. Wind wouldn’t cause that.

            Batters’ exit velocities—the Mets’ and their opponents’—drop by an average of 1 mph at Citi Field compared to every other ballpark, a significant difference currently lacking an explanation. The readings shocked the Mets so much that they thought they must have been an error, but MLB officials checked the calibration of the technology and confirmed it was operating correctly.

            Alan Nathan, a professor emeritus at the University of Illinois and an expert on the physics of baseball, said that storing the balls in a humid environment could lead to reduced exit velocities. The Mets say they have tried keeping the balls in different areas of the stadium, but the experiment hasn’t led to any meaningful improvement.

            It might sound easy to dismiss all this as a legitimate problem for the Mets. After all, Citi Field affects both the Mets and their opponents. The Mets say that view ignores the mental aspect of playing 81 games at a ballpark that punishes hitters. For visitors, “It doesn’t weigh on them as much because they know they’re out of there is in three days,” Long said. “They don’t have to deal with the conditions day in and day out. It’s confidence.”

            Since 2012, the Mets have the highest fly-ball percentage in the National League, reflecting a message from the team’s hitting coaches that focused on driving the ball for power and home runs. Before spring training, Van Wagenen hired veteran instructor Chili Davis as the team’s hitting coach, tasking him with teaching an approach that can succeed at Citi Field. Davis has the Mets thinking smaller.

            “Our approach was competitive last year, but it wasn’t necessarily always, ‘Let’s move this guy over, let’s score this guy.’ It was more, ‘Let’s drive the ball and always be aggressive,’” Conforto said. “If we don’t have a high average at our field, we could play a little more situationally instead of just trying to put the ball in the air.”

            Write to Jared Diamond at jared.diamond@wsj.com


            "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
              Years ago, I remember reading that Fred and Jeff were too cheap to commission studies on wind currents before building Coupon Field. Well...



              https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb...hem/ar-BBVzv4p

              Even the Mets' Home Stadium Is Mocking Them
              Jared Diamond
              18 hrs ago
              It doest take a rocket scientist to figure out that an open outfield facing the bay is going to be a huge challenge.

              The needed to look no further than MCU Park where their own Cyclones play.


              Van Wagenen's answer is just a bunch of bull $hit. There is no competitive advantage whatsoever.

              I have been saying this for a decade -- of all the things this group has done --- nothing is worse than Citi Field. Its a horror.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Paulypal View Post

                It doest take a rocket scientist to figure out that an open outfield facing the bay is going to be a huge challenge.

                The needed to look no further than MCU Park where their own Cyclones play.


                Van Wagenen's answer is just a bunch of bull $hit. There is no competitive advantage whatsoever.

                I have been saying this for a decade -- of all the things this group has done --- nothing is worse than Citi Field. Its a horror.
                As you may recall, the priority was to have a bunch of store frontage abutting 126th Street. Fred had big plans for his neighbors' land, after he'd relieved them of it. Therefore, instead of Coupon Field having center field facing east, like most ballparks, it had to face either southeast (sun in batters' eyes) or northeast (wind coming off bay).

                Fred and Jeff's indifference to everything but the land grab is really highlighted by the way they insisted on weird, deep dimensions - oblivious to the inevitable wind blowing off the bay. Coupon Field was built for two purposes: sucking fans into the retail areas, and as a salient in his conquest of Willets Point. Baseball was an afterthought.


                "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

                Comment


                • Looks like Gio Gonzalez, at $2M, was too expensive for Fred and Jeff.

                  This doesn't bode well for upgrading the rotation. A trade could be made mid-season, but that means no improvement until then. Fred prefers to pay for such upgrades in talent rather than money. Who's left in the Minors? Rajai Davis? Tim Tebow?


                  "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
                    Looks like Gio Gonzalez, at $2M, was too expensive for Fred and Jeff.

                    This doesn't bode well for upgrading the rotation. A trade could be made mid-season, but that means no improvement until then. Fred prefers to pay for such upgrades in talent rather than money. Who's left in the Minors? Rajai Davis? Tim Tebow?
                    I assume the pot odds were not correct. Any signing implies a roster spot must be made, so that needs to be taken into account when seeing if the pot odds are correct, and you take the gamble....
                    20-Game Saturday Plan, Prom Box 423.

                    Comment

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