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  • Originally posted by ReyesOfHope View Post
    In general, I think all hitting coaches are preaching the basically the same mechanics and philosophies. I think a hitting coach is there to observe and make suggestions, but none of which are going to be so radical as to transform a player directly at the MLB level from bad to good, or good to great. Where an MLB player may benefit from a hitting coach the most is that the coach helps the player to maintain focus and discipline. Ultimately, it will be up to the player. There may be exceptions, but George Brett was going to be a great hitter with or without Charlie Lau in my opinion.

    I do think hitting coaches are probably more valuable in the minors where young players may be scooting by on talent alone, rather than skills.
    I agree with this. I think hitting coaches are really nothing more than a pair of eyes to help players catch hitches and fix them. But most veterans are set in their mechanics and I think it's really the hitting coaches in the minor leagues who have the most impact.

    Of course there are exceptions such as Charlie Lau as you pointed out. Rudy Jaramillo is often praised as being an exception hitting coach and I think he deserves a lot of credit for resurrecting Andruw Jones' career. But for the most part, I really don't think hitting coaches are as important as pitching coaches.
    "I'm happy for [Edwin Encarnacion] because this guy bleeds internally, big-time" -Dusty Baker

    "If on-base percentage is so important, then why don't they put it on the scoreboard?" -Jeff Francoeur

    "At the end of the day, the sun comes up and I still have a job" -Joba Chamberlain

    Comment


    • Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
      Yeah and he even wrote the book "The Art of Hitting"
      Ted Williams wrote a book called The Science of Hitting, and yet the 1969 - 1972 Senators/Rangers were consistently among the worst hitting team in the American League with Ted as their manager.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by ReyesOfHope View Post
        Ted Williams wrote a book called The Science of Hitting, and yet the 1969 - 1972 Senators/Rangers were consistently among the worst hitting team in the American League with Ted as their manager.
        Well talent doesn't necessarily equate to coaching. Take Stan Musiel as our hitting coach, or in hockey Wayne Gretzky coaching the Coyotes.

        A little off the topic but "How I'd pitch Babe Ruth" by Seaver was a pretty cool book from what I remember.
        unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
        unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
        unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Joe Rigatoni View Post
          You're right,the salaries were part of it but I feel there were other factors as
          well.It was no accident that 1986 was Kingman's last year as a player due to
          the following.In June 1986,Kingman who was playing with the Oakland A's at
          the time did not see eye to eye with a female reporter Susan Fornoff of the
          Sacramento Bee.Female reporters were not accepted by most athletes to say
          the least back then.Kingman then sent Susan Fornoff a small gift wrapped box
          and inside the box was a live mouse with a tag on it that said "My name is Sue." Then Oakland A's general manager Sandy Alderson was furious and
          embarrassed over the incident and fined Kingman $3500 for it and demanded
          that Kingman give Susan Fornoff a public apology which he did and then said
          it was just a joke.This incident did not sit well with most people in baseball at
          that time or any time for that matter.Plus,throughout Kingman's playing career
          he always had a reputation for being nasty with reporters and fans and many
          people he came in contact with so this was not one bad moment for Kingman,
          but one bad moment among many.I remember when I was a kid and Kingman
          was with the Mets I remember reading a reporter's article how Kingman was
          such a bad guy.As I remember reading the article I said to myself he seems so
          nice when he is on Kiner's Korner.Then I remember literally the next line I read
          from the reporter's article was "Don't be fooled by him acting like a nice guy
          on Kiner's Korner." Basically,Kingman acting like a bad guy was the real him.
          So when the 1986 season ended despite the fact that Kingman hit 35 home
          runs that year there were no takers for Kingman in 1987.Plus,many people in
          baseball besides not liking Kingman's attitude didn't like Kingman's one dimensional game of home runs and nothing else on offense or defense.
          Kingman had 442 home runs at the time and many people in baseball feared
          that if Kingman reached 500 home runs it would be an automatic ticket to the
          Hall Of Fame at that time.Kingman was just 2 more dh years away from
          realistically achieving 500 home runs.Everybody in major league baseball at
          that time who hit at least 500 home runs was in the Hall of Fame except for
          Reggie Jackson and that's because he was still playing and he would obviously
          be an eventual lock when he does become eligible which he did.Ironically enough,Reggie Jackson would replace Dave Kingman as Oakland's primary dh
          in 1987.Also,I should note that Mike Schmidt hit his 500th home run during the
          1987 season and he would obviously be an eventual lock when he does become eligible which he did.I bet most reporters and fans and other baseball
          people were happy that Albert Belle's career was cut short so this would give
          them a legitimate reason not to vote for him in the Hall Of Fame.If Albert
          Belle didn't get hurt and continued playing and had his normal year,year after
          year,whether you liked him or not you had to at least grudgingly vote him into
          the Hall Of Fame.In my opinion,Albert Belle was the nastiest person in baseball.He made Dave Kingman,Barry Bonds,and Randy Johnson among other
          surly types look like Mother Theresa in comparison.Albert Belle was the one
          guy in major league baseball I wouldn't want on my team for any reason because he was that bad of a guy and I didn't want to sell my soul to see my
          team win.But he was the only player in major league baseball I felt that way
          about.Btw,for what it's worth,if you ever meet Dave Kingman at a card show
          today,he is now one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet.I guess age has
          mellowed/humbled him.Thanks for reading.Sincerely,Joe Rigatoni
          Nice to hear Kingman has changed his tune....I've heard and read horror stories about Kingman in regards to fans, especially young ones which is unforgivable in my book. Interesting about MLB in regards to him reaching 500 HR's....Is it safe to say the same thing may have happened to Jose Canseco? I get the feeling he was another we don't want this guy to reach 500 HR's canidate.
          New York (N.L.)
          1888, 1889, 1904, 1905, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1917, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1933, 1936, 1937, 1951, 1954, 1969, 1973, 1986, 2000

          Brooklyn (N.L.)
          1890, 1899, 1900, 1916, 1920, 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956

          New York (A.A.) 1884 Brooklyn (A.A.) 1889

          Comment


          • Originally posted by StrawberryField View Post
            Nice to hear Kingman has changed his tune....I've heard and read horror stories about Kingman in regards to fans, especially young ones which is unforgivable in my book. Interesting about MLB in regards to him reaching 500 HR's....Is it safe to say the same thing may have happened to Jose Canseco? I get the feeling he was another we don't want this guy to reach 500 HR's canidate.
            I remember hearing a story of a young fan who sought Kingman's autograph. The kid tossed Kingman a ball, after being urged to by Kingman. Kingman proceeded to laugh and drop the ball in a puddle on the playing field and jog away. Nice huh?
            unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
            unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
            unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Joe Rigatoni View Post
              ...Kingman hit 35 home runs that year there were no takers for Kingman in 1987...
              He also hit .210.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
                I remember hearing a story of a young fan who sought Kingman's autograph. The kid tossed Kingman a ball, after being urged to by Kingman. Kingman proceeded to laugh and drop the ball in a puddle on the playing field and jog away. Nice huh?
                Horrible, just horrible. I'd be embarrasses to be on the field if I did something like that. I don't get attitudes like this.
                New York (N.L.)
                1888, 1889, 1904, 1905, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1917, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1933, 1936, 1937, 1951, 1954, 1969, 1973, 1986, 2000

                Brooklyn (N.L.)
                1890, 1899, 1900, 1916, 1920, 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956

                New York (A.A.) 1884 Brooklyn (A.A.) 1889

                Comment

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