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  • Paulypal
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    Gentlemen, I give you a treasure.



    Most of you will probably recognize this game after the first few seconds. It was a legendary performance. If you don't know what's coming you're probably in for an even bigger treat.

    I know this is a favorite memory of mine: the most dominating pitcher I've ever seen at the height of his powers.

    Enjoy.
    I agree 100%. In fact personally I consider this the Mets one and only no-hitter. In the top of the 5th Keith Moreland hit a two hopper to Ray Knight. Knight couldn't get the ball out of his glove and he had to eat it. They gave Moreland a hit when clearly if the ball was fielded and thrown normally they get Moreland. Moreland was a catcher and was exactly a speedster. If that play happened in the 8th inning I think they call may have been different.

    Anyway....Any younger Met fans that watch Harvey, or any of the Met young studs....I hate to sound like the old guy, but you haven't seen anything. Dwight Gooden lit Shea Stadium up like no other pitcher/player in their history and yes that includes Tom Seaver. Seaver had the better career but Gooden games became an event. No funny nicknames, no stupid comic book masks, no innings limits, my agent said, no bats (winged), no hammers, no long hair, dont take me out of this game nonsense.........just f'n gas and one of the best curveballs ever.

    That was a fun time in Met history and in my opinion by far the best. 1984-1990 was untouched by an other period in their history. They only won one WS but they were entertaining to watch.

    Watching this makes me realize how gimmicky it has become.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by [insert name] View Post
    Has to be the most underrated moment in Mets history. This was the closest to a no-hitter I saw before Johan Santana. This Mets Squad in 1999 and 2000 are still my favorite. That team made me a Mets fan as a kid.

    I thought the 99 team was more fun than the 00 though they didn't make it as far.

    Hard to explain the kind of impact Gooden had as a 19 year old. The hype (and talent) Harvey has is small by comparison. The mid 83 through 86 teams were like nothing else I've seen in terms of depth of talent and fan involvement. I loved all those players.

    If you look at Gooden you'll notice his fastball was his strikeout pitch here, though he'd get swinging strikes with fastball or curve. By 1985 Stottlemyre had him pitching to contact and he no longer got many swinging strikes on his fastball; his curveball became his strikeout pitch. By 1986 hitters had begun sitting on the fastball and strikeouts were down again.

    This footage reminds you of how hard he was to hit. Back then hitters didn't strike out nearly as much as today. He's either blowing them away with his fastball or making them flinch with the curve. The best stuff ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • [insert name]
    replied
    Has to be the most underrated moment in Mets history. This was the closest to a no-hitter I saw before Johan Santana. This Mets Squad in 1999 and 2000 are still my favorite. That team made me a Mets fan as a kid.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Gentlemen, I give you a treasure.



    Most of you will probably recognize this game after the first few seconds. It was a legendary performance. If you don't know what's coming you're probably in for an even bigger treat.

    I know this is a favorite memory of mine: the most dominating pitcher I've ever seen at the height of his powers.

    Enjoy.
    Last edited by Mongoose; 03-07-2016, 12:14 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • carsdaddy
    replied
    Strawberry's homerun off the rim of the roof at oylimpic staduim in 88.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Rigatoni
    replied
    Originally posted by Paulypal View Post
    Couple of things regarding these two posts:

    The video makes me miss Shea. Although it was a dump towards the end it is still the better option than what we got stuck with.

    Joe Rigatoni - We are the same age - I was also 15 in 1979. Happy 50th at some point this year by the way. I just had mine 3 weeks ago. Anyway....

    There are 1,000,000 factors that made the game different back them. First and foremost we were 15, and not nearly as jaded as we are now. We just wanted to win a game TODAY. Also we didn't have all this media, the internet, the salaries, the ticket prices. It was different world 35 years ago. Geez I sound old here, but it really was. Everything was a bit simpler back then. Baseball included -

    we didn't have the lefty specialist that came in for 4 pitches
    relievers were pitchers that weren't good enough to start, and would pitch 3-4 innings when needed.
    starters were expected to finish games
    batting average was still the way to measure a player
    NO ESPN highlighting and beating to death everything that happened.....ahhh life was good
    we didn't measure players by their salary
    Mike Schmidt scared the hell out of us as Met fans
    a couple of milk carton purchases got you upper deck tickets
    we didn't know what an oblique was

    Fast forward 35 years - we now know everything that happens including every shady deal the owner makes. We know everyone's salary and use that info like a weapon. We can get on the internet and get anything we want to know about everyone. ESPN has made living on become a sports gossip network. We as fans calculate team payroll and decide who is worth it and who isn't.
    '
    Don't get me wrong there is plenty of good that came with the technology, but it did complicate things. The old saying is "ignorance is bliss"......well we no longer can claim ingnorance is this information era.......so bliss goes by the wayside.
    Happy 50th birthday Paulypal! I turned 50 on February 1.Milladrive turned 50 on April 9.
    Excellent points on this post as well as I couldn't agree more!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paulypal
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe Rigatoni View Post
    I look at those late 1970s teams more fondly also simply because I was 15 in 1979.And as recently as 1978 you still got to
    hear Lindsey Nelson call Mets games on tv and radio.Curt Gowdy and Lindsey Nelson were two of my favorite sportscasters
    of all time.I know I told this story in other posts before but in 1979 I remember when Willie Montanez got traded from the
    Mets to the Rangers.Coincidentally Montanez got traded from the Mets to the Rangers after the Mets played a Sunday
    afternoon game against the Braves at Shea and before the Rangers played the Yankees the next night at Yankee Stadium.
    So a friend of mine who is a mutual friend of milladrive's and I at that time pictured the conversation that went on when
    Mets GM Joe McDonald told Montanez he got traded.So after the Sunday afternoon game against the Braves at Shea we
    pictured the conversation went something like this.McDonald says:"Willie,we traded you to the Rangers." And Montanez
    says:"I had a feeling I might be traded.Well,that's baseball.Ok,where's my plane fare?" And McDonald says: "Plane fare?
    What plane fare? Here's your subway token."(lol).Well,a few years ago at an autograph signing I asked Montanez to sign
    a 8x10 photo personalized to my friend "Thanks for the subway token." When I asked Montanez to do that he had a
    puzzled look on his face.So I told him the story and he bursted out laughing and he signed it for me exactly the way I
    wanted him to.He also signed a 8x10 photo personalized to me with the same inscription.So he personalized each 8x10
    photo for my friend and I with our names saying Thanks for the subway token.Willie Montanez#25.My friend who's not
    even into autographs and doesn't impress easily got a big kick out of it.That was really cool.
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    I think it really was different back then. Check out this home video of Opening Day 1982:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhLekUOdarU

    The players somehow felt more familiar then. Everything was more mellow; even if the team was bad Shea was a nice place to be. They used to have events like Photo Day where anyone could come down and take a photo of a Met. Now those things are reserved for season ticket holders.

    In those days I think a field box cost less than $5 and you didn't have to get season tickets to get access to anything. It was so readily accessible and casual and inexpensive it seems like a dream.

    As I recall Bob Murphy used to say MontaƱez was the kind of player other players referred to as a "hot dog"; his words. I think he watched the few home runs he hit for a while after he hit them. I don't recall anyone ever throwing at him, though. He seemed to get more slack than Valdespin, for example.
    Couple of things regarding these two posts:

    The video makes me miss Shea. Although it was a dump towards the end it is still the better option than what we got stuck with.

    Joe Rigatoni - We are the same age - I was also 15 in 1979. Happy 50th at some point this year by the way. I just had mine 3 weeks ago. Anyway....

    There are 1,000,000 factors that made the game different back them. First and foremost we were 15, and not nearly as jaded as we are now. We just wanted to win a game TODAY. Also we didn't have all this media, the internet, the salaries, the ticket prices. It was different world 35 years ago. Geez I sound old here, but it really was. Everything was a bit simpler back then. Baseball included -

    we didn't have the lefty specialist that came in for 4 pitches
    relievers were pitchers that weren't good enough to start, and would pitch 3-4 innings when needed.
    starters were expected to finish games
    batting average was still the way to measure a player
    NO ESPN highlighting and beating to death everything that happened.....ahhh life was good
    we didn't measure players by their salary
    Mike Schmidt scared the hell out of us as Met fans
    a couple of milk carton purchases got you upper deck tickets
    we didn't know what an oblique was

    Fast forward 35 years - we now know everything that happens including every shady deal the owner makes. We know everyone's salary and use that info like a weapon. We can get on the internet and get anything we want to know about everyone. ESPN has made living on become a sports gossip network. We as fans calculate team payroll and decide who is worth it and who isn't.
    '
    Don't get me wrong there is plenty of good that came with the technology, but it did complicate things. The old saying is "ignorance is bliss"......well we no longer can claim ingnorance is this information era.......so bliss goes by the wayside.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe Rigatoni View Post
    I look at those late 1970s teams more fondly also simply because I was 15 in 1979.And as recently as 1978 you still got to
    hear Lindsey Nelson call Mets games on tv and radio.Curt Gowdy and Lindsey Nelson were two of my favorite sportscasters
    of all time.I know I told this story in other posts before but in 1979 I remember when Willie Montanez got traded from the
    Mets to the Rangers.Coincidentally Montanez got traded from the Mets to the Rangers after the Mets played a Sunday
    afternoon game against the Braves at Shea and before the Rangers played the Yankees the next night at Yankee Stadium.
    So a friend of mine who is a mutual friend of milladrive's and I at that time pictured the conversation that went on when
    Mets GM Joe McDonald told Montanez he got traded.So after the Sunday afternoon game against the Braves at Shea we
    pictured the conversation went something like this.McDonald says:"Willie,we traded you to the Rangers." And Montanez
    says:"I had a feeling I might be traded.Well,that's baseball.Ok,where's my plane fare?" And McDonald says: "Plane fare?
    What plane fare? Here's your subway token."(lol).Well,a few years ago at an autograph signing I asked Montanez to sign
    a 8x10 photo personalized to my friend "Thanks for the subway token." When I asked Montanez to do that he had a
    puzzled look on his face.So I told him the story and he bursted out laughing and he signed it for me exactly the way I
    wanted him to.He also signed a 8x10 photo personalized to me with the same inscription.So he personalized each 8x10
    photo for my friend and I with our names saying Thanks for the subway token.Willie Montanez#25.My friend who's not
    even into autographs and doesn't impress easily got a big kick out of it.That was really cool.
    I think it really was different back then. Check out this home video of Opening Day 1982:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhLekUOdarU

    The players somehow felt more familiar then. Everything was more mellow; even if the team was bad Shea was a nice place to be. They used to have events like Photo Day where anyone could come down and take a photo of a Met. Now those things are reserved for season ticket holders.

    In those days I think a field box cost less than $5 and you didn't have to get season tickets to get access to anything. It was so readily accessible and casual and inexpensive it seems like a dream.

    As I recall Bob Murphy used to say MontaƱez was the kind of player other players referred to as a "hot dog"; his words. I think he watched the few home runs he hit for a while after he hit them. I don't recall anyone ever throwing at him, though. He seemed to get more slack than Valdespin, for example.

    Leave a comment:


  • trepye
    replied
    Seldom have I lost my composure as when Piazza hit that insanely CLUTCH 3-run shot against the braves (8th inning if memory serves) in the '99 playoffs. Was listening on the radio and had to pull over to ride out my raw exuberance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Rigatoni
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    You're not old enough to be a curmudgeon.

    It's a shame you missed out on the mid 1980s teams. Some of the finest moments are discussed in this thread. Hopefully you made it to Shea Stadium a few times. Even with the awful paint job and other ill-advised renovations it was still somehow saturated with Mets character.

    What's funny is I personally remember the late 1970s teams more fondly than the mid to late aughts teams. I think I could explain it if I wanted but would prefer to hear other people's thoughts. What do the rest of you think?
    I look at those late 1970s teams more fondly also simply because I was 15 in 1979.And as recently as 1978 you still got to
    hear Lindsey Nelson call Mets games on tv and radio.Curt Gowdy and Lindsey Nelson were two of my favorite sportscasters
    of all time.I know I told this story in other posts before but in 1979 I remember when Willie Montanez got traded from the
    Mets to the Rangers.Coincidentally Montanez got traded from the Mets to the Rangers after the Mets played a Sunday
    afternoon game against the Braves at Shea and before the Rangers played the Yankees the next night at Yankee Stadium.
    So a friend of mine who is a mutual friend of milladrive's and I at that time pictured the conversation that went on when
    Mets GM Joe McDonald told Montanez he got traded.So after the Sunday afternoon game against the Braves at Shea we
    pictured the conversation went something like this.McDonald says:"Willie,we traded you to the Rangers." And Montanez
    says:"I had a feeling I might be traded.Well,that's baseball.Ok,where's my plane fare?" And McDonald says: "Plane fare?
    What plane fare? Here's your subway token."(lol).Well,a few years ago at an autograph signing I asked Montanez to sign
    a 8x10 photo personalized to my friend "Thanks for the subway token." When I asked Montanez to do that he had a
    puzzled look on his face.So I told him the story and he bursted out laughing and he signed it for me exactly the way I
    wanted him to.He also signed a 8x10 photo personalized to me with the same inscription.So he personalized each 8x10
    photo for my friend and I with our names saying Thanks for the subway token.Willie Montanez#25.My friend who's not
    even into autographs and doesn't impress easily got a big kick out of it.That was really cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • LAS1914
    replied
    Every game we were invited to sing along as the words were flashed on the scoreboard as Jane Jarvis at the Magnovox Organ(1964 & 65) /Thomas Organ(1966 - 1979) played Meet the Mets.

    Leave a comment:


  • PVNICK
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    You're not old enough to be a curmudgeon.

    It's a shame you missed out on the mid 1980s teams. Some of the finest moments are discussed in this thread. Hopefully you made it to Shea Stadium a few times. Even with the awful paint job and other ill-advised renovations it was still somehow saturated with Mets character.

    What's funny is I personally remember the late 1970s teams more fondly than the mid to late aughts teams. I think I could explain it if I wanted but would prefer to hear other people's thoughts. What do the rest of you think?
    You think it was the team and the ownership difference or just your age and lack of jadedness. Presumably, you like me, were somewhere between 8 and 18 without much of a care in the world so everything seems better. Cans of RC Cola, rope swings, baseball cards in the spokes, mom embarassing you by hollering to come in for dinner, someone's older sister saying hello ....

    edited to add: The Willie Montanez home run trot, glove tricks would be considered abominations now as opposed to things you imitated.
    Last edited by PVNICK; 03-27-2014, 05:03 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by pstein View Post
    I first became a Mets fan in late '04/2005. I was 9 (I'm now 18) when David Wright came up. One of the first games I can remember watching was when the Mets were in Atlanta and getting absolutely killed (they were 0-4 at this point). Aaron Heilman was the starter that day, and he gave up at least one home run I can remember.

    My favorite Mets memory? The 2006 NLDS with that play by Paul Lo Duca and the NLCS with the Endy Chavez catch. Alas, it was all for naught, as Aaron Heilman gave up the game-winning homer to Yadier Molina (who couldn't hit at that point of his career). I remember crying when that happened.
    You're not old enough to be a curmudgeon.

    It's a shame you missed out on the mid 1980s teams. Some of the finest moments are discussed in this thread. Hopefully you made it to Shea Stadium a few times. Even with the awful paint job and other ill-advised renovations it was still somehow saturated with Mets character.

    What's funny is I personally remember the late 1970s teams more fondly than the mid to late aughts teams. I think I could explain it if I wanted but would prefer to hear other people's thoughts. What do the rest of you think?

    Leave a comment:


  • dstoffa
    replied
    Originally posted by mandrake View Post
    I am not 100% sure since I wasn't alive, but the 1958 'greatest game" may have been blocked out in NYC on NBC.
    The 1958 NFL Championship Game was NOT broadcast on a NYC TV Station.

    The Home Team's games never were... and since the Giants were hosting, it was blacked out.

    Leave a comment:


  • pstein
    replied
    I first became a Mets fan in late '04/2005. I was 9 (I'm now 18) when David Wright came up. One of the first games I can remember watching was when the Mets were in Atlanta and getting absolutely killed (they were 0-4 at this point). Aaron Heilman was the starter that day, and he gave up at least one home run I can remember.

    My favorite Mets memory? The 2006 NLDS with that play by Paul Lo Duca and the NLCS with the Endy Chavez catch. Alas, it was all for naught, as Aaron Heilman gave up the game-winning homer to Yadier Molina (who couldn't hit at that point of his career). I remember crying when that happened.

    Leave a comment:

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