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  • dstoffa
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    I can't place an exact date on when Opening Day sold out as a matter of course. I never tried to get any tickets during most of that period. All I can tell you is, it seemed to generally correlate with reselling being legalized.
    Opening Day didn't start selling out until after the strike. It was late 90's. Internet was still dial-up for many. The internet-based ticket resellers came to the scene in the mid-to late 00's. I didn't sell any of my tickets on-line until 2006, I believe, and that was only because I was forced out of town to travel that summer.

    And while it may not have sold out, it became a more difficult ticket to get once it was bundled with other games of interest (like a Subway Series game). SO maybe by '98, when the Mets introduced those six-packs, is when Opening Day became more difficult to get, but not impossible..

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by dstoffa View Post

    I was able to take the 7 out to Shea to buy OD tickets for 1993 vs Colorado, not too far in advance... I know the programs sold out... The game might not have been... But I, too, recall Jay Horowitz even stating in the mid-to-late 90's that the Mets typically don't sell out Opening Day... Things changed. And it wasn't ticket re-selling, because the Internet boom on resales really didn't take off until the late aughts.

    Also remember.... The $10 Field Level box seat behind the plate was the same price as the Mezzanine box seat in fair territory back then... Another late 90's change... Charge more for better seats instead of one price for every seat...
    I can't place an exact date on when Opening Day sold out as a matter of course. I never tried to get any tickets during most of that period. All I can tell you is, it seemed to generally correlate with reselling being legalized.

    I checked out the Ultimate Mets page for Dan Norman. He's beloved, especially by those who've known him. It's an interesting sort of fame those who've had brief MLB careers enjoy.

    Leave a comment:


  • dstoffa
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    Opening Day was never a big deal back then. It didn't become one until ticket reselling was legalized, and a ton of people became season ticket holders. I guess Opening Day was marketed to them as a perk, and became generally regarded as one. A low turnout 40 years ago isn't surprising. Early-mid April is too cold for baseball. Remember, the NL counted turnstile attendance back then. Look at the field level seats in the outfield. They're full. You sometimes don't see that at Coupon Field with announced attendance more than double the 12,219.
    I was able to take the 7 out to Shea to buy OD tickets for 1993 vs Colorado, not too far in advance... I know the programs sold out... The game might not have been... But I, too, recall Jay Horowitz even stating in the mid-to-late 90's that the Mets typically don't sell out Opening Day... Things changed. And it wasn't ticket re-selling, because the Internet boom on resales really didn't take off until the late aughts.

    Also remember.... The $10 Field Level box seat behind the plate was the same price as the Mezzanine box seat in fair territory back then... Another late 90's change... Charge more for better seats instead of one price for every seat...

    Leave a comment:


  • LI METS FAN
    replied
    Originally posted by Mister B. View Post

    There was also a transit strike going on. I even remember driving in the torrential rain the day before.
    Wow you’re right. The strike ended the day after Opening Day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mister B.
    replied
    Originally posted by LI METS FAN View Post

    Usually Opening Day is quite cold. Opening day 1980- after 3.42 inches of rain fell the previous day, the Mets opener featured temperatures approaching 70 degrees. A day game of course. Did they win? It's Opening Day, of course they did.
    There was also a transit strike going on. I even remember driving in the torrential rain the day before.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paulypal
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    And the Mets usually won opening day. A lot of that was courtesy of Tom Seaver.
    I remember getting the Daily News the day after OD when I was a kid and seeing the Mets on top in the NL East.....even just for a day it was a good deal. By game 5 things were back to normal, but I had that one day, and the Daily News to prove it.

    Leave a comment:


  • LI METS FAN
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    And the Mets usually won opening day. A lot of that was courtesy of Tom Seaver.
    Seaver and Gooden are tied with 6 wins for the most in franchise history. Probably will stand for awhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • LI METS FAN
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post


    Opening Day was never a big deal back then. It didn't become one until ticket reselling was legalized, and a ton of people became season ticket holders. I guess Opening Day was marketed to them as a perk, and became generally regarded as one. A low turnout 40 years ago isn't surprising. Early-mid April is too cold for baseball. Remember, the NL counted turnstile attendance back then. Look at the field level seats in the outfield. They're full. You sometimes don't see that at Coupon Field with announced attendance more than double the 12,219.
    Usually Opening Day is quite cold. Opening day 1980- after 3.42 inches of rain fell the previous day, the Mets opener featured temperatures approaching 70 degrees. A day game of course. Did they win? It's Opening Day, of course they did.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by milladrive View Post

    Thanks for the Ehrhardt info. I never knew he left for political reasons, but I'm not surprised. Far be it for the Wimpons to ever be able to laugh at themselves or accept criticism graciously. Granted, they were trying to market a new image and get out of that 70s legacy of losing, but you would think that as old Brooklyn Dodger fans, they would've fondly remembered Emmett Kelly, Hilda Chester, the Sym-Phony Band, etc. But Fred's insecurities have always outweighed any capacity for self-effacement.

    As for turning OD into a bona fide promotional event in the day'n'age of mega-marketing, that too makes sense. It's probably either my fuzzy memory or the fact that my friends and I made it an annual event as far back as the fuzziness goes -- or both -- that had me thinking it's always been a big day for all baseball fans. At very least, for me, it's always been the day the new yearbook was released. But yeah, I kinda knew things had gotten to another level when they eliminated General Admission. Yet even that was just the beginning of the end. I was able to attend OD regularly until a certain point, when I no longer wanted to afford it anymore, and getting tickets as a group became prohibitive.

    I'll always miss that excitement. That energy. The thought of being 0-0, a contender again. As Pauly would say, there was probably no better time to get that World Series parade planned. lol
    And the Mets usually won opening day. A lot of that was courtesy of Tom Seaver.

    Leave a comment:


  • milladrive
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    I checked out the other posted Dan Norman videos. I remember being at the ballpark and seeing him put it all out there. He also wore his socks high, in the old fashioned style. So I intuitively felt he was a blue collar type player, and relatable. Those interviews back that notion up.

    That's early McCarver; he really was good, before he became full of himself and obnoxious. I'm sorry Nelson had left, and Murphy was taken off TV, but Murphy did flourish on radio. Kiner, unshackled from the chains of play by play, was allowed to be Kiner, and McCarver helped bring that out.

    I'm not going to pretend to know who Sam Ewing is (wasn't that the only NBA draft they let the Knicks win?), but going to Shea really was unique and awesome then. Flushing was different. I still like going to Flushing after a game to eat, and there's still appeal, but the stores and food and surroundings used to be unique. Now, you might as well take the 7 into Manhattan, and then head to the actual Chinatown.

    Shea still had its original color scheme, and was a very mellow place; you saw more brawls in the stands in the Bronx. And yet, there was a subtle feeling of not-exactly-anarchy, but that you could really relax, and do what you wanted. It was easy to find seats with no immediate neighbors. Security had a substantially hands-off policy. I won't argue it had the charm of Ebbets Field, but it was a lovely, open space the fans managed to infuse with their spirit. Whatever New York was at that time, whatever the totality of Mets history was, Shea was. If you were there, you understand.

    There's some footage with sound taken at the subsequent Opening Day. When you see it, you become aware of how everything at Coupon Field has been weaponized to sell and upsell you. This creates a tension never existed in the 1970s, or even early to mid-80s. The experience then was qualitatively different, and better.



    I remember stories about Ehrhardt in the news at the time:

    Ehrhardt stopped going to Met games after the 1981 season. By then, the Mets had several consecutive non-competitive seasons and were considered losers. Ehrhardt said that the Mets, who had become a laughingstock, were no longer inviting him to team functions because of his criticisms of the team via his signs. "The front office was now run by new ownership, and they didn't like me criticizing the team," he said. "They turned their backs on me, so I just packed up my signs and went home."[1]

    I was too lazy to find contemporary accounts. That's from Wikipedia. It'll do. He was purged.

    Opening Day was never a big deal back then. It didn't become one until ticket reselling was legalized, and a ton of people became season ticket holders. I guess Opening Day was marketed to them as a perk, and became generally regarded as one. A low turnout 40 years ago isn't surprising. Early-mid April is too cold for baseball. Remember, the NL counted turnstile attendance back then. Look at the field level seats in the outfield. They're full. You sometimes don't see that at Coupon Field with announced attendance more than double the 12,219.
    Thanks for the Ehrhardt info. I never knew he left for political reasons, but I'm not surprised. Far be it for the Wimpons to ever be able to laugh at themselves or accept criticism graciously. Granted, they were trying to market a new image and get out of that 70s legacy of losing, but you would think that as old Brooklyn Dodger fans, they would've fondly remembered Emmett Kelly, Hilda Chester, the Sym-Phony Band, etc. But Fred's insecurities have always outweighed any capacity for self-effacement.

    As for turning OD into a bona fide promotional event in the day'n'age of mega-marketing, that too makes sense. It's probably either my fuzzy memory or the fact that my friends and I made it an annual event as far back as the fuzziness goes -- or both -- that had me thinking it's always been a big day for all baseball fans. At very least, for me, it's always been the day the new yearbook was released. But yeah, I kinda knew things had gotten to another level when they eliminated General Admission. Yet even that was just the beginning of the end. I was able to attend OD regularly until a certain point, when I no longer wanted to afford it anymore, and getting tickets as a group became prohibitive.

    I'll always miss that excitement. That energy. The thought of being 0-0, a contender again. As Pauly would say, there was probably no better time to get that World Series parade planned. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by Blue387 View Post
    If I had to pick a recent memory in the past 10 years, I would pick May 7, 2013 when Matt Harvey pitched nine innings of one-hit ball and, being the Mets, got no run support. It was the most amazing pitching performance I have ever seen in person.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blue387
    replied
    If I had to pick a recent memory in the past 10 years, I would pick May 7, 2013 when Matt Harvey pitched nine innings of one-hit ball and, being the Mets, got no run support. It was the most amazing pitching performance I have ever seen in person.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mongoose
    replied
    Originally posted by Paulypal View Post

    Mongoose - thanks for the videos. That Dan Norman one was very interesting. He didnt have it easy at all.



    The video with Seavers return -- the best part about that was (to me anyway) hearing McCarver & Kiner. McCarver was really becoming a good announcer at that time, and Kiner.......is Kiner.



    Shea OD 1980 - When I look back at those terrible Mets teams playing in Shea - obviously like all of us that lived through it it becomes nostalgic and there is a quote that comes to mind -

    "When you finally go back to your old hometown...you find it wasn't the old home you missed, but your childhood." --Sam Ewing

    Yes we all miss Shea, and we all feel something for the "Kingman/Seaver Mets", but I think its being 16 that is missed as much as any of it.
    I checked out the other posted Dan Norman videos. I remember being at the ballpark and seeing him put it all out there. He also wore his socks high, in the old fashioned style. So I intuitively felt he was a blue collar type player, and relatable. Those interviews back that notion up.

    That's early McCarver; he really was good, before he became full of himself and obnoxious. I'm sorry Nelson had left, and Murphy was taken off TV, but Murphy did flourish on radio. Kiner, unshackled from the chains of play by play, was allowed to be Kiner, and McCarver helped bring that out.

    I'm not going to pretend to know who Sam Ewing is (wasn't that the only NBA draft they let the Knicks win?), but going to Shea really was unique and awesome then. Flushing was different. I still like going to Flushing after a game to eat, and there's still appeal, but the stores and food and surroundings used to be unique. Now, you might as well take the 7 into Manhattan, and then head to the actual Chinatown.

    Shea still had its original color scheme, and was a very mellow place; you saw more brawls in the stands in the Bronx. And yet, there was a subtle feeling of not-exactly-anarchy, but that you could really relax, and do what you wanted. It was easy to find seats with no immediate neighbors. Security had a substantially hands-off policy. I won't argue it had the charm of Ebbets Field, but it was a lovely, open space the fans managed to infuse with their spirit. Whatever New York was at that time, whatever the totality of Mets history was, Shea was. If you were there, you understand.

    There's some footage with sound taken at the subsequent Opening Day. When you see it, you become aware of how everything at Coupon Field has been weaponized to sell and upsell you. This creates a tension never existed in the 1970s, or even early to mid-80s. The experience then was qualitatively different, and better.

    Originally posted by milladrive View Post

    Haha, I love the footage of giving the finger to the truck with "Yankees" on it.

    Opening Day 1980. Attendance: 12,219. On Opening Day. Could we imagine that small a crowd for even a meaningless game in 2019, much less on OD? Even after living thru it, I still find it hard to believe that a MLB team located in New York City could regularly draw what the Mets drew -- or didn't draw -- in those years.

    Did they stop showing Ehrhardt's signs because of the signs' tone or language, or was it for the same reason they stopped showing people running on field? I'd always been under the assumption they stopped showing them because he'd stopped coming to the games.
    I remember stories about Ehrhardt in the news at the time:

    Ehrhardt stopped going to Met games after the 1981 season. By then, the Mets had several consecutive non-competitive seasons and were considered losers. Ehrhardt said that the Mets, who had become a laughingstock, were no longer inviting him to team functions because of his criticisms of the team via his signs. "The front office was now run by new ownership, and they didn't like me criticizing the team," he said. "They turned their backs on me, so I just packed up my signs and went home."[1]

    I was too lazy to find contemporary accounts. That's from Wikipedia. It'll do. He was purged.

    Opening Day was never a big deal back then. It didn't become one until ticket reselling was legalized, and a ton of people became season ticket holders. I guess Opening Day was marketed to them as a perk, and became generally regarded as one. A low turnout 40 years ago isn't surprising. Early-mid April is too cold for baseball. Remember, the NL counted turnstile attendance back then. Look at the field level seats in the outfield. They're full. You sometimes don't see that at Coupon Field with announced attendance more than double the 12,219.
    Last edited by Mongoose; 06-02-2020, 12:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • milladrive
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post

    And here's some home movie footage of Opening Day 1980. Maybe the best part is the Karl Ehrhardt signs, which WOR no longer showed on their broadcasts. We never saw these at home. They had turned hostile. Still, Shea looks amazing, like some of us really remember it.


    Haha, I love the footage of giving the finger to the truck with "Yankees" on it.

    Opening Day 1980. Attendance: 12,219. On Opening Day. Could we imagine that small a crowd for even a meaningless game in 2019, much less on OD? Even after living thru it, I still find it hard to believe that a MLB team located in New York City could regularly draw what the Mets drew -- or didn't draw -- in those years.

    Did they stop showing Ehrhardt's signs because of the signs' tone or language, or was it for the same reason they stopped showing people running on field? I'd always been under the assumption they stopped showing them because he'd stopped coming to the games.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paulypal
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
    Speaking of 1979, I was trying to find Steve Henderson video, as a Met, and instead came across a series of interviews with Dan Norman. He was supposedly thrown into the Seaver trade at the insistence of Joe McDonald's son. He had tools, too. Looking back on his splits, he mashed left handed pitching, but had problems against right handers (probably a function of limited playing time). He played hard, though. Because of that, I liked him.

    I found some video of him which, though not really related to his time on the Mets, I found entertaining, and thought some other people might like, too. He originally wanted to be a stunt man. He's interesting, and it's a pretty short video.


    And here's some home movie footage of Opening Day 1980. Maybe the best part is the Karl Ehrhardt signs, which WOR no longer showed on their broadcasts. We never saw these at home. They had turned hostile. Still, Shea looks amazing, like some of us really remember it.



    And finally, Tom Seaver's return to Shea: Opening Day 1983.



    Enjoy!
    Mongoose - thanks for the videos. That Dan Norman one was very interesting. He didnt have it easy at all.



    The video with Seavers return -- the best part about that was (to me anyway) hearing McCarver & Kiner. McCarver was really becoming a good announcer at that time, and Kiner.......is Kiner.



    Shea OD 1980 - When I look back at those terrible Mets teams playing in Shea - obviously like all of us that lived through it it becomes nostalgic and there is a quote that comes to mind -

    "When you finally go back to your old hometown...you find it wasn't the old home you missed, but your childhood." --Sam Ewing

    Yes we all miss Shea, and we all feel something for the "Kingman/Seaver Mets", but I think its being 16 that is missed as much as any of it.

    Leave a comment:

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