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  • Dillon Gee rushed to hospital

    Dillon Gee was rushed to the hospital after a blood clot was discovered in his shoulder. Let's all pray for a speedy recovery, for his sake!
    unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
    unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
    unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

  • #2
    No kidding...that's scary--I had a blood clot lodge in my frontal lobe when I was seven...

    Had a stroke that nearly killed me, I was out for days, almost needed brain surgery.

    Good luck to Gee!

    (And I hate to be "that guy," but for the team as well--like I just said, I, out of everyone, know how serious a blood clot is, I'm not minimizing it, of course his health comes first, I'm just saying, when he DOES come back, after he takes all the time he needs...well...he shouldn't rush it, and needs to take all the time he needs...but he can't come back soon enough from just a team perspective.)
    "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

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    • #3
      Wow. Thank God you made it SHEA KNIGHT !!!! Clots are very serious stuff. You probably realize how lucky you were !

      Clots move; they go to the brain and you stroke. They move to the lungs and its a pulmonary embolism. They move to the heart and it's MI (heart attack).

      Say a prayer for Dillon.

      And a prayer of thanks that fellow member on baseball fever Shea Knight made it through his ordeal when he was younger.

      Comment


      • #4
        LOL, thatnk you for that very much.

        I actually recall it was something like the particular clot I had, there were only 10 or so cases of it doing what it did (how it lodged in my frontal lobe and the fact that, for whatever reason, it dissipated before the need for surgery after a few days.)

        So yeah, long odds, and that's part of the reason why I really put so much effort in trying to be a writer and dreaming about that--

        Because, despite all that and a Jewish heritage, I am an atheist, and was agnostic most of my childhood, so it was kind of an interesting thing, I guess...

        When I was younger I'd think about it and wonder "If I'd have died, and I did got to Heaven, would I always be 7 years old in Heaven...I don't like being 7 now, I'd have had to be 7 forever?!"

        And when I came to be agnostic, and now as an atheist, I always think about it and wonder, after all the people I've met and things I've seen and done, how odd it'd be if I was "always 7" in everyone's mind if I'd died, and either 7 years old forever or forgotten.

        So more incentive to be a writer--Shakespeare, Milton, T.S. Eliot, my three favorite writers...no one thinks of THEM and pictures them as a 7 year old.

        Plus, being an atheist, I always took a lot more comfort and guidance from literature and philosophy and sociology than the Bible (though I am reading it now to further my education, just finished Exodus, so onto Leviticus, which I dread given how often it's quoted now in tandem the poor treatment of gays by certain groups) and he being my all-time icon, I try and remember Mr. Shakespeare's words here the same way I suppose most would remember a favorite Bible story or Psalm:

        "So long as men can breathe or eyes can see
        So long lives this, and this gives life to thee."

        --Shakespeare, Sonnet 18.

        I just find those very good words to live by...and I like Shakespeare's attitude in that ending couplet--like Dante before him, HE KNEW he was good, and so the same way Dante in his works had the fictional version of Virgil compliment him and call him a great poet, Shakespeare here sort of shows off the fact that he knows his poetry and prose is so good, it'll last as long as humanity as we know it lasts...and so long as that poetry lasts, Shakespeare and his friend will thus never be forgotten, they'll "live on" in the only way we can.

        Anyway, that was a long ramble session about nothing remotely Mets related, so...erm...Let's Go Mets, and Get Well Gee?
        "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

        Comment


        • #5
          I wonder if Gee could be suffering from thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A lot of pitchers are prone to this. Other big-league pitchers who've had it: Whitey Ford, J.R. Richard (it's what caused his stroke), Wayne Simpson, David Cone (caused his arm aneurysm), Aaron Cook (pulmonary embolisms), and Dennis “Oil Can” Boyd.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Shea Knight View Post
            LOL, thatnk you for that very much.

            I actually recall it was something like the particular clot I had, there were only 10 or so cases of it doing what it did (how it lodged in my frontal lobe and the fact that, for whatever reason, it dissipated before the need for surgery after a few days.)

            So yeah, long odds, and that's part of the reason why I really put so much effort in trying to be a writer and dreaming about that--

            Because, despite all that and a Jewish heritage, I am an atheist, and was agnostic most of my childhood, so it was kind of an interesting thing, I guess...

            When I was younger I'd think about it and wonder "If I'd have died, and I did got to Heaven, would I always be 7 years old in Heaven...I don't like being 7 now, I'd have had to be 7 forever?!"

            And when I came to be agnostic, and now as an atheist, I always think about it and wonder, after all the people I've met and things I've seen and done, how odd it'd be if I was "always 7" in everyone's mind if I'd died, and either 7 years old forever or forgotten.

            So more incentive to be a writer--Shakespeare, Milton, T.S. Eliot, my three favorite writers...no one thinks of THEM and pictures them as a 7 year old.

            Plus, being an atheist, I always took a lot more comfort and guidance from literature and philosophy and sociology than the Bible (though I am reading it now to further my education, just finished Exodus, so onto Leviticus, which I dread given how often it's quoted now in tandem the poor treatment of gays by certain groups) and he being my all-time icon, I try and remember Mr. Shakespeare's words here the same way I suppose most would remember a favorite Bible story or Psalm:

            "So long as men can breathe or eyes can see
            So long lives this, and this gives life to thee."

            --Shakespeare, Sonnet 18.

            I just find those very good words to live by...and I like Shakespeare's attitude in that ending couplet--like Dante before him, HE KNEW he was good, and so the same way Dante in his works had the fictional version of Virgil compliment him and call him a great poet, Shakespeare here sort of shows off the fact that he knows his poetry and prose is so good, it'll last as long as humanity as we know it lasts...and so long as that poetry lasts, Shakespeare and his friend will thus never be forgotten, they'll "live on" in the only way we can.

            Anyway, that was a long ramble session about nothing remotely Mets related, so...erm...Let's Go Mets, and Get Well Gee?
            Glad you came out on top of your situation. Tough going for a 7 year old.

            Your wanting to be writer is obvious...some of your posts should be listed by chapter.

            Comment


            • #7
              My hunch about TOS was backed up...but it remains to be seen if that's really the cause:

              http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...espn-says.html

              The story mentions blood thinners. That and enzyme treatment was what enabled Oil Can Boyd to keep pitching.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
                My hunch about TOS was backed up...but it remains to be seen if that's really the cause:

                http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...espn-says.html

                The story mentions blood thinners. That and enzyme treatment was what enabled Oil Can Boyd to keep pitching.
                Every one, of course, is different. A clot that moves to the lungs, heart, or brain is often fatal. I am glad they caught his when it was in a non lethal area.

                Using coumadin or pridaxa or lovenox can also have some bad side effects...bleeding internally can be as deadly as the clot.

                Let's just hope they caught it and it is manageable and he comes back and can pitch for the Mets down the road.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's to hoping for Gee's full recovery.

                  And, of course, it goes without saying, SK, how glad I am that you're here to share your story with us!
                  Put it in the books.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This has a chance to snowball real fast for the team. 2 of the other 4 guys in the rotation are coming off major shoulder surgery. A DL trip for either of them would pretty much put a nail in the coffin for the season unless they get a starter via trade.....Garza anyone?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ralf View Post
                      This has a chance to snowball real fast for the team. 2 of the other 4 guys in the rotation are coming off major shoulder surgery. A DL trip for either of them would pretty much put a nail in the coffin for the season unless they get a starter via trade.....Garza anyone?
                      We need a bullpen arm way too much to spend whatever capital we're willing to part with on a starter.

                      I think we can get by with Dickey/Santna/Niese and Chris Young pitching the way he has (that is, decently if not spectacularly, a textbook #4-5 starter) until Gee comes back, if he does, but not without a bullpen arm added.

                      If Gee doesn't come back, it'll be harder still, but we'll see, he's a good #4, but still, it's not as if he's one of our Main Three...if we had to "pick" any of our 1-4 starters to hit the DL, who among us wouldn't have chosen Gee?

                      Still, hope he comes back strong.
                      "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

                      Comment

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