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Scott Atchison appreciation thread

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  • Scott Atchison appreciation thread

    Does anybody else love this guy? I mean, he reminds me of me. Me right now! He gives hope to those of us who have gained some girth over the years. He shows that, Yes we over 35 year olds can play ball! He looks like the everyman, and how can you not root for a guy like that?

    scott-atchison.jpg
    unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
    unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
    unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

  • #2
    Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
    Does anybody else love this guy? I mean, he reminds me of me. Me right now! He gives hope to those of us who have gained some girth over the years. He shows that, Yes we over 35 year olds can play ball! He looks like the everyman, and how can you not root for a guy like that?

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]122591[/ATTACH]
    Little known Atchison fact - surprised the SNY guys don't bring this up - he's 57 years old!
    Cleon Jones catches a deep fly ball in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Valley of the Ashes, and a second-grader smiles in front of the black and white television.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well here's a story about his daughter:


      NY Mets pitcher Scott Atchison's daughter, Callie, battles rare genetic disorder, an inspiration to Atchison
      It was the first of many moments over the past five years when the tiny little blond girl named Callie would teach her parents, Scott and Sarah, that things are not always as difficult as they first seem. It was also Callie, now 5, who made her dad take a second chance on pitching in the majors after he settled in with some success in Japan.

      By Kristie Ackert / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
      Saturday, April 13, 2013, 9:11 PM

      The first time that Scott Atchison remembers his daughter proving him wrong was when she was just a couple months old. Lying on her stomach, his tiny daughter twisted her legs and raised herself up, without her arms, into a sitting position just with the power of her core muscles.

      “It was not how any other person would have done it,” the Mets reliever said with a proud smile. “She just figured it out she could do it and that was that.”

      It was the first of many moments over the past five years when the tiny little blond girl named Callie would teach her parents, Scott and Sarah, that things are not always as difficult as they first seem. It was also Callie, now 5, who made her dad take a second chance on pitching in the majors after he settled in with some success in Japan.

      One of the veteran arms that Mets general manager Sandy Alderson picked up this offseason to try to strengthen a bullpen that was ranked 29th out of 30 teams in 2012, Atchison has a 1.69 ERA in five appearances so far. He pitched two scoreless innings in the Mets’ 16-5 win over Minnesota Friday night.

      He would not be here in the majors trying to help the Mets at all, however, if it wasn’t for his daughter.

      RELATED: HARVEY'S NO-HIT BID ENDS IN SEVENTH, BUT METS HANG ON TO TOP TWINS

      Callie was born with thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome (TAR). It is a rare genetic disorder that is characterized by low levels of platelets in the blood, and an absence of the radius bones, the long, thin bones of the forearms that support her wrists and give strength to her thumbs. Callie also has a slight bowing of her legs because of it.

      Just hours old, Callie was already battling through life. She was born with an extremely low blood-platelet count, which contributes to the clotting of blood. She was immediately transferred to the Children’s Hospital in Fort Worth, in the Atchisons’ native Texas and began a series of five transfusions. She would need 10 transfusions in the first two months before her blood platelet level would stabilize.

      Scott remembers sitting and looking at his tiny daughter with an IV tube connected to her head, worrying what kind of life she might have.

      “You can’t help but think that there will be all these things she won’t be able to do. And because her arms are shorter without the radius bone, you worry that maybe kids will tease her,” Scott Atchison said. “It is always hard to imagine what babies will be when they grow, but we never imagined all the things she would show us she could do.”

      The blood-platelet count stabilized, but Callie had little use of her right hand. She required surgery in January 2010 and intensive occupational therapy to build support for her wrist and thumb on her right arm.

      The Atchisons, who were living in Japan at the time, returned to the United States. Scott had stints in the majors for the Mariners (2004-05) and Giants (2007), but had found success in Japan with the Hanshin Tigers of Kyoto, Japan. He returned to the U.S. with a minor-league contract and invitation to the major league camp from the Red Sox.

      “We knew Callie would need therapy after surgery. We needed to be closer to her doctors in Dallas,” Scott said. “The team in Japan said they’d help us, I was doing well there and they wanted me to stay, but it was time to come home for Callie.”

      While Scott earned his spot in the Red Sox bullpen, Sarah and Callie went through therapy to develop her hand movements. He went 5-4 with a 3.18 ERA in 141.2 innings over 102 appearances with the Red Sox the past three seasons. She began going to school, learning to write to use her thumbs and hands.

      Scott missed two months last season with a torn ligament in his pitching elbow. After deciding against surgery, he completely rested the elbow for three weeks and then returned in time to pitch for the Red Sox in September. A 49th-round draft choice after rotator-cuff surgery in college threatened to end his career before it began, he is familiar with injuries.

      In baseball, those are considered major obstacles. Watching his daughter learn to make her way in the world, figuring out how to hold a pen or grasp a baseball with her left hand and throw it, however, has put it all in perspective.

      “She figures out how to do things. We worried she would have trouble with writing, coloring, cutting when she went to school, but she has found a way,” Atchison said. “It may not be the way I would do it, but she finds a way.

      “And she has never let this slow her down. She loves school. The teacher said she is the one who is friends with both the girls and the boys. She just finished her first season of T-ball, and she loves soccer,” he continued. “As a parent, I think we worried about what she might miss out on or might not be able to do, but she doesn’t. She just shows us how she is going to do it.”


      Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/ba...#ixzz2UzEcr9Vi

      Too bad he's had ongoing problems with his elbow:

      http://metsmerizedonline.com/2013/05...d-surgery.html

      I would like the chance to appreciate him more. He seems like a good guy.


      "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't appreciate the way he stunk with the Mets.

        This seems to happen a lot with the Mets ...

        They get a guy, like Atchison, who had a good year the season before with his former team. Then he stinks with the Mets. Then he goes away and gets good again. I wonder why that is. It happened with JJ Putz, too.

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