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Memorable Mets Home Run Thread

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  • #16
    1967 At Pittsburgh on August 17, Harrelson hit an inside-the-park home run (his first career homer) in the Mets’ 6-5 triumph over the Pirates in the first game of a doubleheader.

    I remember watching on TV. The ball landed on the foul line and the outfielder ran in to argue the call. Bud just ran around the bases.

    I miss Sunday doubleheaders. You don't have to go back to 154. Just schedule Sunday doubleheaders against teams in your division in case of rainouts. Does not have to be every Sunday.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mandrake View Post
      1980..Mets sweep the Dodgers.....And then on Saturday night the Giants are up 6-0..... Then 6-2 with 2 out in the ninth...... With it 6-4 and two on and two out. Steve Henderson comes up at the 51 minute nark, (I can't find this homer anywhere else. ) If you were a baseball fan in NY, you lived this. I knew NYY fans who were going crazy watching this. For the first time since the 1973 WS, Shea was rocking.,

      If you are a long time Mets fan and you don't know what is meant by "that Henderson home run".......well, I'd have to question one's credentials.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCu_PlNImnw
      This. How many did Henderson hit that season? Not very many as I recall.

      And, of course, Strawberry off the clock.

      Nobody's mentioned Carter Opening Day 1985.

      I can still see Ray Knight's Game 7 HR hitting the tarp (or whatever it was) over the outfield wall, which I don't think was mentioned. I can also see Dykstra one-handing his Game 3 HR.

      Pratt. Ventura.

      I remember being at Shea behind 3rd base and watching a Strawberry line drive HR that wasn't sinking yet when it hit the second deck.


      "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Mongoose View Post
        This. How many did Henderson hit that season? Not very many as I recall.

        And, of course, Strawberry off the clock.

        Nobody's mentioned Carter Opening Day 1985.

        I can still see Ray Knight's Game 7 HR hitting the tarp (or whatever it was) over the outfield wall, which I don't think was mentioned. I can also see Dykstra one-handing his Game 3 HR.

        Pratt. Ventura.

        I remember being at Shea behind 3rd base and watching a Strawberry line drive HR that wasn't sinking yet when it hit the second deck.
        1979 was Grant's tomb at Shea. This June 1980 Hendu homer was the first time in years that Shea rocked. The crowd was into it, Shea was moving. - I had been to 2 of the Dodger games Monday and Wednesday previous, and I think the upper deck was closed off for new seating so GA was the last rows of the mezz. To see the Mets ushers high fiving Hendu and the Mets was incredible.

        Steve Albert was doing the game. I did not hear it on the replay, but at the time I seem to recall Ralph Kiner saying in the back ground "that ball is hit deep" at the crack of the bat.

        As for Colon and "one of the greatest plays in baseball history" remark by Gary Cohen....what the heck as happened to him as an announcer. He has become the biggest shill in sports since Gene Hart and the Flyers. Mets are wining another game by 9 runs and he screams "it's outta here" at the top of his lungs...my wife tells me "Will you turn that down"....and I reply "It is down...this idiot thinks he is announcing for the WWE". It's tough to enjoy the artistry of Keith and Ron with the screaming shill drowning them out.

        When did he start screaming...was it that Lagares "is the only center fielder who can make that play " or was it Cespedes hot streak last year ? Or even earlier?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mandrake View Post
          1979 was Grant's tomb at Shea. This June 1980 Hendu homer was the first time in years that Shea rocked. The crowd was into it, Shea was moving. - I had been to 2 of the Dodger games Monday and Wednesday previous, and I think the upper deck was closed off for new seating so GA was the last rows of the mezz. To see the Mets ushers high fiving Hendu and the Mets was incredible.

          Steve Albert was doing the game. I did not hear it on the replay, but at the time I seem to recall Ralph Kiner saying in the back ground "that ball is hit deep" at the crack of the bat.

          As for Colon and "one of the greatest plays in baseball history" remark by Gary Cohen....what the heck as happened to him as an announcer. He has become the biggest shill in sports since Gene Hart and the Flyers. Mets are wining another game by 9 runs and he screams "it's outta here" at the top of his lungs...my wife tells me "Will you turn that down"....and I reply "It is down...this idiot thinks he is announcing for the WWE". It's tough to enjoy the artistry of Keith and Ron with the screaming shill drowning them out.

          When did he start screaming...was it that Lagares "is the only center fielder who can make that play " or was it Cespedes hot streak last year ? Or even earlier?
          Don't forget the "net negative" interview. At that time he also advanced the organization psy-op that it wouldn't make sense to sign Cespedes. (And they did try to get away with De Aza as their big outfield signing.)

          Jeffy must have let it be known Gary needed to be more of a company man/cheerleader/shill.


          "The Fightin' Met With Two Heads" - Mike Tyson/Ray Knight!

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Paulypal View Post
            Gary Cohen showed what an idiot he truly is by calling Colon's homer "one of the greatest moments in baseball history". That guy is just a moron. Yes Gary its right up there with Kirk Gibsons homer in 1988 , and Mays' catch in 1954. My Lord

            Colons homer was awesome though, and his teammates reaction showed how much they love the guy.
            I think he was being facetious about "one of the greatest moments in baseball history." I mean, he was enjoying the moment like we all were, but I think he laid it on a little thicker like that just to have fun with it.

            As for memorable HRs (good thread idea): Since the first-tier ones have been taken, may I suggest a Tommie Agee walkoff shot in the 14th inning against Juan Marichal, deep in the 1969 pennant race. Marichal pitched the whole game for the Giants and the final score was 1-0.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Mister B. View Post
              I think he was being facetious about "one of the greatest moments in baseball history." I mean, he was enjoying the moment like we all were, but I think he laid it on a little thicker like that just to have fun with it.

              As for memorable HRs (good thread idea): Since the first-tier ones have been taken, may I suggest a Tommie Agee walkoff shot in the 14th inning against Juan Marichal, deep in the 1969 pennant race. Marichal pitched the whole game for the Giants and the final score was 1-0.

              Opening day 1969, Agee hits the only HR ever into the upper deck at Shea. Mets lose to expansion Expos, but they were not the same old Mets. My dad was at the game and swears that if he didn't hit the small section of the upper deck that was in fair territory, that ball was way out on the parking lot.

              Don't forget the "wind blown" (???) Kingman blast in 1976 at Wrigley. I don't think video survives of this, but it was much further than his 1979 blast at Wrigley.

              http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2...aveland-avenue

              On Wednesday, he caught what may have been the longest home run ever hit out of Wrigley Field.

              Dave Kingman of the New York Mets hit it off pitcher Tom Dettore in the sixth inning. It was an awesome blow which exploded off Kingman's bat and soared high into the 16-mile-per-hour jetstream which was blowing toward left-center field.

              Keiber, the man who has a duffel bag full of baseballs at his home .. the man who caught Ron Santo's 200th .. the man who dreams of someday playing shortstop for the Cubs, was stunned.

              He estimated it traveled 600 feet.

              "I was sitting on the curb, across Waveland Avenue [behind the left-field bleachers], listening to Vince and Lou on the radio and when I heard the crowd I knew it was coming my way," recounts Keiber.

              "But when I finally saw it ... high above that 40-foot screen and as high as the top of the flagpole, I just couldn't believe it."

              Keiber wasn't the only disbeliever. At least a half-dozen other home run chasers had congregated around the popular intersection of Waveland and Kenmore--and three youngsters with gloves, when they saw Kingman's home run coming, turned and started running north on Kenmore

              The ball sailed over their heads, struck the porch of the third house from the Waveland Ave. corner on the fly, and caromed back.

              "I caught it on the carom," he said, proudly, displaying the ball which showed only the slightest blemish. "Gawd, it was hit. Nobody ever hit a ball out of Wrigley Field like that."

              Maybe Keiber is right. Vince Lloyd says he remembers Hank Sauer hitting one which departed the park just left of the scoreboard. Marv Grissom says he remembers throwing one to Dick Stuart which traveled a greater distance out of old Forbes Field in Pittsburgh. Keiber himself recalls one which Willie Stargell smashed over the center-field wall at Wrigley Field ["I missed it by 40 feet."]

              But Kingman's home run was truly incredible, primarily because it soared so high before beginning its descent.

              Keiber, incidentally, insists his estimate of 600 feet is accurate. He should know. He's measured the distance from the back of the left-field wall [it's about 400 feet from home plate"] and knows it's another 75 to 80 feet across Waveland Avenue.

              "Kingman's ball landed at least another 100 feet past that," says Keiber. "When it went over my head I couldn't believe it. I've seen some big home runs hit out by Jim Hickman, Roberto Clemente, Willie Mays, Stargell and even Hank Aaron, but nobody ever hit one like this. Not out of Wrigley Field."

              Lou Ness, ex-Brooklyn Eagle sports writer who now serves as traveling secretary for the Mets, left the press box immediately after Kingman's blow and found Keiber with the ball [he also had another one which Kingman had hit out in batting practice].

              He took Keiber into the Mets' locker room after the 6-5 loss to the Cubs and introduced him to Kingman, the 6-6, 210-pounder from Mount Prospect, Ill. Kingman didn't appear too excited about the introduction. After all, the Mets had lost and he was 1-for-4, striking out twice. Then Keiber told him it traveled 600 feet.

              "Really? How do you know that?" asked Kingman.

              "I just know," said Keiber. "It's the longest one I've ever seen and I wanted to give you the ball."

              Comment


              • #22
                June 2005- Marlon Anderson inside-the-park home run to tie the Angels in the 9th. Cliff Floyd 3 run homer to win it in the bottom of the 10th. Long at bat, I was there and it was so much fun to see a win against a team like the Angels.

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                • #23
                  This was against the Mets, but I will never forget it as I was at the game and it was one of only 3 times I have ever been to Wrigley Field:



                  This home run was just mammoth:

                  Last edited by jjpm74; 05-10-2016, 07:53 PM.

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                  • #24
                    I just came across this excellent Mets post season HR video montage. I completely agree with #1 on this!

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                    • #25
                      A few more:



                      Before my time, but a 3 run walk off home run for the 1963 Mets hit by Duke Snider at the old Polo Grounds. This was his 399th career home run:



                      Last edited by jjpm74; 05-10-2016, 08:26 PM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by mandrake View Post
                        Don't forget the "wind blown" (???) Kingman blast in 1976 at Wrigley. I don't think video survives of this, but it was much further than his 1979 blast at Wrigley.
                        Here is the crazy 1979 home run in one of the most offense foward games of all time. It's crazy to think that he hit two balls further than this in his career. He was possibly the most one dimensional hitter of all time, but his home runs were mammoth:

                        Last edited by jjpm74; 05-10-2016, 08:24 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mister B. View Post
                          I think he was being facetious about "one of the greatest moments in baseball history." I mean, he was enjoying the moment like we all were, but I think he laid it on a little thicker like that just to have fun with it.
                          I agree. He was just caught up in the moment, and I believe he said so himself later. Remember, this is Gary Cohen, not John Sterling. Lord only knows how Sterling would have called it if he was behind the mike.

                          It may not have been the greatest moment in baseball history, but it was big enough to sell almost 9,000 Topps Now cards commemorating the event - the most Topps Now cards sold by a huge margin.
                          X
                          What's THAT guy doing?
                          - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            For me the most memorable home run has to be the pinch-hit four-bagger Damion Easley hit in the bottom of the 10th inning with the Mets one strike away from a loss to Colorado on April 24, 2007. (The Mets would win the game in the 12th, on an Endy Chavez bunt single that drove in the winning run.)

                            But this is not an objective comment. I was at that game - I was in the picnic bleachers - and I caught the ball.
                            X
                            What's THAT guy doing?
                            - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post
                              But this is not an objective comment. I was at that game - I was in the picnic bleachers - and I caught the ball.
                              WOW! That is a real treasure! I wish I had a piece of history close to that!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Metsies8 View Post
                                I remembered the Henderson home run and that it was to right field. I thought Mazzili would be a star, I lived close to where Pauly and Mazzilli lived. Mazilli was a legend.
                                Mazzilli was a neighborhood legend of course as was John Franco and Pete Falcone.

                                Quick story:

                                In the late 80's I was in the gym I worked out in (in Brooklyn) and I see John Franco (he was still pitching with the Reds). So I walked over an introduced myself and we started talking. I was 23-24 at the time. Franco was 26-27. The previous baseball season I was at Shea and Strawberry hit a walk off homer off of Franco in the 10th inning I believe. So In my conversation with Franco I mention I was at that game. He laughed and told me the date of the game and what pitch it was. I saw him quite a bit after that in the gym, and we became friendly. He is a really good guy and even at 26-27 years old he had no ego about being a good major league pitcher. He was a regular guy.

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