Roy Halladay has flirted with the .667 mark in winning percentage for parts of the last three seasons, temporarily reaching that mark, then slipping back below it. His win in a wild 9-7 Phillies victory over the Marlins Tuesday night, pushes his career winning percentage right back to the .667 mark. Halladay is now 198-99 lifetime, with exactly 2/3 of his decisions being wins (198 wins in 297 decisions). He should probably get four more starts, including a start in the Phillies season finale on October 3.
The .667 mark is quite an accomplishment, especially when you consider all the greats and Hall Of Famers that never reached that milestone. Even current stars like Justin Verlander
(120-64), C.C.Sabathia (189-101), Andy Pettite (243-141) and Tim Hudson (194-102) are close to the .667 mark, but fall short of it. Recent star Randy Johnson was over the .667 mark for part of his career but finished well under with a 303-166 final mark. The list of pitchers to top the .667 mark lifetime is very small. Using 100 wins as a minimum, the list contains seven pitchers. Use 150 wins as a minimum to qualify and you're down to 5. Whitey Ford (236-106 - .690 winning percentage) is considered the best pitcher all-time in terms of winning percentage, followed by 19th Century star Bob Caruthers ( 218 wins with a .688 win. pctg). and Pedro Martinez (219-100 - .686 win. pctg). Lefty Grove (300-140 - .680 win. pctg) has the best winning percentage among 300 game winners. Others include (100 win minimum): 19th Century stars Dave Foutz (like Ford he has a .690 win. pctg. but won only 147 games), Post World War Two Yankees star Vic Raschi (132-66 - .667 win pctg) - and now Halladay rejoins that list.