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Pronouce CF Taylor Douthit

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  • Pronouce CF Taylor Douthit

    I've been studying the defensive statistics of MLB players. In 1928, Taylor Douthit had what was likely the greatest year for a CF. His name isn't used much and I don't know how its pronounced. How is Douthit pronounced?
    Code:
    Decade	POS	T/B	Team	Age	Player  Name	Exp	Year	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	AVG	SB	OFF	G	PO	A	E	DP	TC	DEF
    1920	CF	R/R	STL	27	Douthit, Taylor	5	1928	154	648	111	191	35	3	3	43	84	36	.295	11	759	154	547	10	9	4	566	562
    Last edited by HDH; 08-13-2006, 09:33 AM.
    In the 1920's, Harry Heilmann led the AL with a .364 average. In addition, he averaged 220 hits, 45 doubles, 12 triples, 16 homers, 110 runs, and 130 RBI.

  • #2
    I think it's "Dowt-it" but not completely sure. Never heard that much mention of him growing up, heard much more about Terry Moore's expertise in CF, but then he was about 10 years later. I was looking in Bob Broeg's book "Redbirds" they have of picture of Douthit-he's an impressive looking athlete. Good sized player for that era, 5'11", 175, but had little power...Rickey got traded him in 1931 to put Pepper Martin in CF, who was also making 10K a year less, something the Cards did quite a bit during the Rickey era. Rickey was right too, Douthit was out of MLB in 2 years.
    It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

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    • #3
      Rickey's Great Instincts

      64, Thanks for your response and why 64? I was considering writing the Cards and asking the question. The pattern I'm uncovering seems to be the rangiest CFs have that 1-2 peak years then, their lack of offense tends to keep them off the field as well. I assume that Rickey knew this trend before it was a trend.
      In the 1920's, Harry Heilmann led the AL with a .364 average. In addition, he averaged 220 hits, 45 doubles, 12 triples, 16 homers, 110 runs, and 130 RBI.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by HDH
        64, Thanks for your response and why 64? I was considering writing the Cards and asking the question. The pattern I'm uncovering seems to be the rangiest CFs have that 1-2 peak years then, their lack of offense tends to keep them off the field as well. I assume that Rickey knew this trend before it was a trend.
        Rickey, who got a percentage of the profits as the team GM, operated on a simple theory...get rid of a player a year too early rather than a year too late. He put together a superb farm system, in order to be able to replace a talented player with another talented player, who would be making the minimun slary and save what was, at the time, a considerable difference in salary. It worked pretty well.

        As for 64, well the 64 Cards were my favorite team. They came from 11 back in August to win the pennant on the last day of the season, then beat the last of the great Yankee teams of the post WW2 era in a terrific WS.
        It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

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        • #5
          I have always heard it pronounced with the th sound.
          BobbyTolan#17

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bobby Tolan17
            I have always heard it pronounced with the th sound.
            from
            http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/...r=0&ln=Douthit

            Douthit
            English: variant of Douthwaite, a habitational name from Dowthwaite in Cumbria or Dowthwaite Hall in North Yorkshire. The first is from the Old Norse personal name Dúfa + Old Norse þveit ‘clearing’; the second is from the Old Irish personal name Dubhan + Old Norse þveit. The elliptic form of the surname probably reflects the local pronunciation of the place names.
            (The 'þ' symbol in Old Norse represents the 'th' sound as in 'thin.')

            Too bad. With his range factor, "doubt-hit" was the appropriate pronunciation.
            The ball once struck off,
            Away flies the boy
            To the next destin'd post,
            And then home with joy.
            --Anonymous, 1744

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