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  • Why New Jersey

    Why did O'Malley decide to play regular season games in New Jersey. The reason O'Malley gave in 1955 was that they wanted to have someplace to play, while the new Brooklyn Stadium was being built and that this was a trial run. That doesn't make sense since he had a lease to continue playing at Ebbets Field that was renewable. Maybe the real reason was to see what kind of reaction he would get or to see if the Dodgers would draw fans outside of Brooklyn. Jersey City was hostile territory to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Fans came to see them play even if most of them were rooting for whoever(whomever?) the Dodgers were playing.
    Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
    www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by tonypug
    Why did O'Malley decide to play regular season games in New Jersey. The reason O'Malley gave in 1955 was that they wanted to have someplace to play, while the new Brooklyn Stadium was being built and that this was a trial run. That doesn't make sense since he had a lease to continue playing at Ebbets Field that was renewable. Maybe the real reason was to see what kind of reaction he would get or to see if the Dodgers would draw fans outside of Brooklyn. Jersey City was hostile territory to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Fans came to see them play even if most of them were rooting for whoever(whomever?) the Dodgers were playing.
    http://www.thediamondangle.com/marasco/hist/nj5657.html

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    • #3
      Maybe he used Jersey City as a threat? Of course one look at that dump and the threat turned into a joke. :atthepc
      http://www.nflfans.com/x/forumdisplay.php?f=55 :atthepc

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ColtscorrAL
        Maybe he used Jersey City as a threat? Of course one look at that dump and the threat turned into a joke. :atthepc
        Thats what people believed, but it took money to play in Jersey City and O'Malley didn't spend money without a good reason.
        Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
        www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

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        • #5
          Roosevelt Stadium was not a "dump." It was one of America's most attractive stadia.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by musial6
            Roosevelt Stadium was not a "dump." It was one of America's most attractive stadia.
            First, let me welcome you to BBF and OUR little corner of it, musial6.

            As to Roosevelt Stadium....having been there at that time, I must respectfully disagree with you.....it was one of the worst ballparks I have ever seen (and I have been to almost all of them).

            c.

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            • #7
              Having never been to Roosevelt Stadium, I am not qualified
              to comment on it. However, after reading about it and seeing
              a picture of it (albeit a postcard picture) on Jerserycityonline,
              it does not appear to be as bad as it is being described.

              From the picture it has an sharp art deco look to it. Still,
              as said earlier, I was never there.

              Perhaps some of you long time Brooklyn fans can explain.
              Was it the stadium itself, or what the games there were
              foreshadowing?

              Thanks for any input.

              Brownie31

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              • #8
                It was all part of the piece of human garbage's plan to try to blackmail the city of new york to steal land it did not own, give it to him so he could build his stadium. He was trying to show he was serious about the need for a new ballpark and that there was no law saying he had to play in Brooklyn...something he was obviously going to prove a couple of years later.

                In the context of so many things he did, including buying an airplane, we can look back on it today and understand what he was doing and that he had made up his mind he was leaving Brooklyn long before the actual theft of the franchise took place.

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                • #9
                  Did you know that Roosevelt Stadium, including its surrounding park, was actually the LARGEST stadium in America? It had parking for 10,000 cars, Ebbets Field only 700. Whereas it eventually fell into decay and desolation (what doesn't?), it was antiseptic in the '40s and into the '50s. I witnessed Jackie's debut there in April, '46. What a day! The overflow crowd was actually roped off on the playing field in foul territory. Further, the first high school football rivalry in the U. S.(Dickinson and St. Peter's Prep) was renewed there every Thanksgiving morning before 25,000 fans.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by musial6
                    Did you know that Roosevelt Stadium, including its surrounding park, was actually the LARGEST stadium in America? It had parking for 10,000 cars, Ebbets Field only 700. Whereas it eventually fell into decay and desolation (what doesn't?), it was antiseptic in the '40s and into the '50s. I witnessed Jackie's debut there in April, '46. What a day! The overflow crowd was actually roped off on the playing field in foul territory. Further, the first high school football rivalry in the U. S.(Dickinson and St. Peter's Prep) was renewed there every Thanksgiving morning before 25,000 fans.
                    musial6:

                    It was also built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA)
                    and named for FDR. Truly loaded with history!

                    It is a shame that it, like Ebbets Field and the Polo Grounds,
                    had a date with the wrecking ball!

                    Brownie31

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                    • #11
                      I agree that Roosevelt Stadium was a sad venue when the Dodgers played there those two years.

                      In its day it was likely a good place, but it had not been used for baseball for several years after the Jersey City Giants moved to Ottawa.

                      Seeing my Brooks there was like watching the Knicks play a home game at the 69th Street Armory.

                      Just did not fit.

                      As to why OM staged that excursion, I agree that it was a threat.

                      Too bad he carried out that threat.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Dodgers in New Jersey

                        I know that most forum members know what is in the article, but going back and reading the original newspaper accounts was necessary for me and it gave me a little more perspective as well as reconfirming that the truth is difficult to find.

                        http://baseball.suite101.com/article..._in_new_jersey
                        Baseball articles you might not like but should read.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
                          I know that most forum members know what is in the article, but going back and reading the original newspaper accounts was necessary for me and it gave me a little more perspective as well as reconfirming that the truth is difficult to find.

                          http://baseball.suite101.com/article..._in_new_jersey
                          Hello: There are two statements in that article that don't ring true to me. I attended ten games at Roosevelt Stadium in the summers of '56 and '57. The first was the statement that tickets would be sold in "blocks of eight; all or nothing". That's simply not true. My dad bought our tickets (2) before each game we attended together. The second statement by O'Malley that the Dodgers may play ALL their 1958 games at Jersey City (????).......I NEVER heard of that before. My family had moved from Brooklyn to Jersey, and we attended games both at Roosevelt Stadium AND Ebbets Field. The question of O'Malley's interest in the Atlantic Ave. site has been well documented in this forum (and others) time and time again. The man had decided to move long before and had a deal in place--the latest during the '56 World Series.
                          you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                          http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                          • #14
                            O'Malley didn't have a deal in place until the beginning of October of 1957. The LA city council didn't pass a resolution to put togeher a stadium package until the very last minute. O'Malley had to notify NL officials by October 1, 1957 on his intentions of moving the Dodgers or not. The LA negotiations took so that O'Malley had to get an extention form the NL. If the LA negotiations had broken down, I think the Dodgers have played in Ebbets Field in 1958, but I think the chances were high they would have played out the season in Jersey City.

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                            • #15
                              O'Malley knew by the latest October 1956 when the Dodger plane on the way back from Japan stopped in LA so he could be helicoptered over the Chavez Ravine site...at that point he told LA city officials he was coming but since he would have to play in Brooklyn in 1957 not to worry and so he spent the entire 1957 season telling Brooklyn fandom that he wanted to keep the team in Brooklyn but it was clear when he bought a plane, when he traded the Ft. Worth franchise to Phil Wrigley for the LA franchise and of course in mid May 1957 when the NL voted to allow him to move....and then in August when the Giants announced they were moving to San Francisco...the last formal steps were taken in October but he was gone long before then....of course the Atlantic/Flatbush was a smoke screen since the property was not public property and NY State law clearly prohibited city officials from seizing the land using eminent domain for a ball part (not a hospital, not a highway but a ball park tohand over to another private entity)..I have no doubts Moses was not inclined to go out of his way for O'Malley anyway but in this case his (Moses') hands were clearly tied...and even if Moses was so inclined, coming up with a fair price for the land would have been next to impossible...low balling the Pennsylvania Railroad which owned the land surely would have led to law suits on their part; paying an inflated price and handing it over to O'Malley for whatever (incidentally, part of the "justification" for what later happened in LA was he "traded" the land and property of Wrigley Field for the land at Chavez Ravine; he made no such offer with Ebbets Field, now did he?) there surely would have been all sorts of citizens' law suits (see Ratner, Bruce for evidence of this and that land today is publically owned).....

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