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  • Which Train

    I want to visit the old site of ebbets field so which subway bus or what ever must i take to get there
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ford Prefect
    I want to visit the old site of ebbets field so which subway bus or what ever must i take to get there
    Take the BMT Brighton local or express and get off at Prospect Park. Then ask for walking directions to Ebbets Field Apartments.

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    • #3
      Professor, if I may insert myself in here, the BRIGHTON EXPRESS/LOCAL are no longer called by the names WE knew them. I know the BRIGHTON EXPRESS is now called the "Q" Line; I am not sure about the BRIGHTON LOCAL.

      Ford Prefect, you can, of course, ask for directions, but perhaps this will help! When taking this train, go to the back of the train and exit there. When you exit the Prospect Park Station, turn left and walk towards Empire Blvd. Cross Empire Blvd. and then walk right on Empire Blvd until you reach Franklin Avenue. Turn left on Franklin Avenue and walk (I believe it is still) two blocks to Sullivan Place. Turn right on Sullivan Place and cross over. Then walk right on Sullivan Place to the next corner which is McKeever Place and cross over. YOU will now be standing on hallowed ground; right on that corner stood the entrance to OUR ROTUNDA of OUR EBBETS FIELD. If you walk straight down Sullivan Place, towards Bedford Avenue, you will be walking down OUR first base/rightfield line. Take note of the sign on the apartment building on this corner. Turn left at the corner and walk on Bedford Avenue toward (the next corner) Montgomery Street. You will now have walked passed OUR right and center fields. Turn left on Montgomery Street and walk up to Mc Keever Place. You will now have walked pass OUR leftfield. Turn left on Mc Keever Place and walk back up to Sullivan Place. You will now have passed OUR leftfield/third side of OUR EBBETS FIELD.

      Please come back and tell US about your experience. WE would love to hear about it.

      c.
      Last edited by DODGER DEB; 01-22-2006, 04:15 AM.

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      • #4
        The 24/7 Brighton service is called the Q train and runs down Broadway in Manhattan...during the hours from 7 AM to 9 PM on weekdays, you can also take the B train which runs down 6th Avenue to Prospect Park and follow Dodger Deb's instructions above.

        The B41 bus line runs down Flatbush Avenue from downtown Brooklyn if you stay at the Brooklyn Marriot and stops right at the Prospect Park station.

        There is no longer IRT, BMT and IND in NYC....the trains lines are either given letters (the old BMT and IND) or numbers (the old IRT). The nearest IRT station was Sterling Street on what is now the number 2 and number 5 lines; I remember the sign saying Ebbets Field.

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        • #5
          thanks guys i print this and put it into my trip folder i go in may and let you know then
          The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DODGER DEB
            Professor, if I may insert myself in here, the BRIGHTON EXPRESS/LOCAL are no longer called by the names WE knew them. I know the BRIGHTON EXPRESS is now called the "Q" Line; I am not sure about the BRIGHTON LOCAL.
            With all due respect to our learned moderator, Ford Prefect wishes to visit the old site of Ebbets Field, and no Q train ever took anybody there. Somehow, Ford Prefect will have to find an ancient token worth no more than 15 cents, drop it into an ancient turnstile, and wait patiently for either of the Brighton trains to arrive. I would suggest a station like Newkirk Avenue where locals and expresses stop. This process may take some time, but if Mr. Prefect is not in a hurry, I firmly believe that train will arrive and his wishes will be granted.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by donzblock
              With all due respect to our learned moderator, Ford Prefect wishes to visit the old site of Ebbets Field, and no Q train ever took anybody there. Somehow, Ford Prefect will have to find an ancient token worth no more than 15 cents, drop it into an ancient turnstile, and wait patiently for either of the Brighton trains to arrive. I would suggest a station like Newkirk Avenue where locals and expresses stop. This process may take some time, but if Mr. Prefect is not in a hurry, I firmly believe that train will arrive and his wishes will be granted.
              Professor, when you're right...you're right! And, you are absolutely right about no "Q" train ever ever taking any of US to OUR Ebbets Field. I somehow tranformed myself into the present...and that is not acceptable here. I don't know what came over me!

              BTW, how long do you think Ford Prefect's complete journey will take?

              c.
              Last edited by DODGER DEB; 01-22-2006, 11:26 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                BTW, how long do you think Ford Prefect's complete journey will take?

                c.
                When you're having fun, time flies.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Will he be allowed to visit the rotunda. By the way I have some of those old tokens if he needs one. My dad sved one each time the fare went up. Quite a collection.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chiefpaddy
                    Will he be allowed to visit the rotunda. By the way I have some of those old tokens if he needs one. My dad sved one each time the fare went up. Quite a collection.
                    If he wants to visit OUR Rotunda, he will have to check will Jaykay. He is the keeper of the keys, among other things down there.

                    But, I am sure your old tokens will come in handy, chiefpaddy.

                    c.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by donzblock
                      Somehow, Ford Prefect will have to find an ancient token worth no more than 15 cents, drop it into an ancient turnstile, and wait patiently for either of the Brighton trains to arrive.
                      May I present an alternative, Professor?

                      (www.mo.com/brooklyn)
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by VIBaseball
                        May I present an alternative, Professor?

                        (www.mo.com/brooklyn)
                        Great shot, VIBaseball!

                        That bus had to be the Lorimer Street bus which rode along Franklin Avenue. It even looks like one of the electric buses that were in use between the trolley cars and the regular buses.

                        c.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                          That bus had to be the Lorimer Street bus which rode along Franklin Avenue. It even looks like one of the electric buses that were in use between the trolley cars and the regular buses.

                          c.
                          DODGER DEB-I hate to be picayune, but that most assuredly is NOT a bus-it is a PCC trolley-note the rails underneath. In fact, Number 1000 is renowned as the first of many PCC (President's Conference Committee) cars to ply the trolley rails of Brooklyn.

                          Here's a more "revealing" photo of #1000, coming off the Brooklyn Bridge:

                          http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?7689

                          For a photo of a "trolley bus", try this link:

                          www.photonewyork.com/prod_images_blowup/Trollebbetspdl.jpg

                          Note the youths "hitching" a ride on the back of the bus on the left, and, of course, the long lost, much lamented EBBETS FIELD to the far left.
                          Last edited by Aa3rt; 01-22-2006, 02:22 PM.
                          "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

                          "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Aa3rt
                            DODGER DEB-I hate to be picayune, but that most assuredly is NOT a bus-it is a PCC trolley-note the rails underneath. In fact, Number 1000 is renowned as the first of many PCC (President's Conference Committee) cars to ply the trolley rails of Brooklyn.

                            Here's a more "revealing" photo of #1000, coming off the Brooklyn Bridge:

                            http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?7689

                            For a photo of a "trolley bus", try this link:

                            www.photonewyork.com/prod_images_blowup/Trollebbetspdl.jpg

                            Note the youths "hitching" a ride on the back of the bus on the left, and, of course, the long lost, much lamented EBBETS FIELD to the far left.
                            Great picturesAart, brings back a lot of memories.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Those trolleys were wonderful, and the ones with the squared noses were very rare on Coney Island Avenue. As for Dodger Deb's electric buses, they were a lot cleaner and quieter than the gas guzzlers, but they had a great deal of trouble making those sharp turns. Inevitably, the part of the bus that made the connection to the hot wires overhead would disconnect, and the driver would have to get out and reattach.

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