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BROOKLYN DODGERS: THE GHOSTS OF FLATBUSH on HBO starting July 11

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  • After reading various articles on Walter O' Malley being voted into the HOF, I'm convinced that the propaganda in the HBO Documentary is the reason why Walter O' Maley got the necessary amount of votes. Michael Shapiro contributed to the HBO Documentary in a significant manner. As far as I'm concerned, Shapiro can be lumped into the category with those who have caused irrepairable damage to the Brooklyn Dodgers.

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    • Originally posted by D6+ View Post
      After reading various articles on Walter O' Malley being voted into the HOF, I'm convinced that the propaganda in the HBO Documentary is the reason why Walter O' Maley got the necessary amount of votes. Michael Shapiro contributed to the HBO Documentary in a significant manner. As far as I'm concerned, Shapiro can be lumped into the category with those who have caused irrepairable damage to the Brooklyn Dodgers.
      Pardon my ignorance. Which one was he in the documentary?

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      • Originally posted by aqib View Post
        Pardon my ignorance. Which one was he in the documentary?

        Michael Shapiro provided material to those at HBO who put the documentary together. In essence, the portion of the documentary that dealt with the franchise move was largely based on the type material from Shapiro's book, " The Last Good Season".

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        • Originally posted by D6+ View Post
          As far as I'm concerned, Shapiro can be lumped into the category with those who have caused irrepairable damage to the Brooklyn Dodgers.
          How? Shapiro didn't deify O'Malley, but he didn't villainize him either. He also gave some compelling reasons why O'Malley might have wanted to leave New York. He also did not try to make a villain of Robert Moses, saying that Moses had the law on his side regarding eminent domain.

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          • Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
            How? Shapiro didn't deify O'Malley, but he didn't villainize him either. He also gave some compelling reasons why O'Malley might have wanted to leave New York. He also did not try to make a villain of Robert Moses, saying that Moses had the law on his side regarding eminent domain.

            There was very little, if any, emphasis on the fact that the Brooklyn Dodgers were making more money over that extended period than any other MLB baseball franchise. The impression that the documentary gave was Walter O' Malley was forced to move in order to remain competitive.


            Also, I thought there was a disproportionate amount of focus on Robert Moses.

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            • Originally posted by D6+ View Post
              There was very little, if any, emphasis on the fact that the Brooklyn Dodgers were making more money over that extended period than any other MLB baseball franchise. The impression that the documentary gave was Walter O' Malley was forced to move in order to remain competitive.


              Also, I thought there was a disproportionate amount of focus on Robert Moses.
              Did you read Shapiro's book? His take on Moses didn't seem much different than that of some of the members of the Brooklyn Dodgers forum.

              The fact that the Brooklyn Dodgers were making more money doesn't change the fact that the Dodgers were an aging team in a ballpark with limited parking. If they slipped into the second division their fortunes didn't look that great in Brooklyn. With no ballpark deal in the forseeable future, the move was inevitable.

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              • Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                Did you read Shapiro's book? His take on Moses didn't seem much different than that of some of the members of the Brooklyn Dodgers forum.

                The fact that the Brooklyn Dodgers were making more money doesn't change the fact that the Dodgers were an aging team in a ballpark with limited parking. If they slipped into the second division their fortunes didn't look that great in Brooklyn. With no ballpark deal in the forseeable future, the move was inevitable.

                My issue about Robert Moses in all of this is more about the amount of emphasis on Moses in the process. It wasn't Moses who made the decision to move the Brooklyn Dodgers. Moses has been made into a convenient scapegoat.


                Until a new ballpark agreement could be reached, at the very least shuttle bus parking from locations somewhat further from Ebbets Field could have been provided. This is how many teams have gotten around parking issue concerns and still do to this day.



                Teams in general that aren't winning are going to have more difficulty with the financial bottom line.


                From my point of view, it still gets back to this: If Walter O' Malley had his heart set on going to Los Angeles, he should have done everything in his power to sell the Dodgers to someone (s ) who would have kept the team in Brooklyn. With the provision of O' Malley getting the rights to an expansion team. Or at the very least, ensure that Brooklyn got an expansion team with the name, colors, logo, and team history of the Dodgers remaining in Brooklyn.

                Walter O' Malley broke a public trust. One that permanently damaged pro sports, as because of O' Malley's actions, every fan base with the exception of the publicly owned Green Bay Packers has reason to be concerned that their team can be taken away. Regardless of how well the team has done financially, compared to the competition. For this reason alone, O' Malley never should have been voted into the HOF.

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                • Originally posted by D6+ View Post


                  From my point of view, it still gets back to this: If Walter O' Malley had his heart set on going to Los Angeles, he should have done everything in his power to sell the Dodgers to someone (s ) who would have kept the team in Brooklyn. With the provision of O' Malley getting the rights to an expansion team. Or at the very least, ensure that Brooklyn got an expansion team with the name, colors, logo, and team history of the Dodgers remaining in Brooklyn.

                  Walter O' Malley broke a public trust. One that permanently damaged pro sports, as because of O' Malley's actions, every fan base with the exception of the publicly owned Green Bay Packers has reason to be concerned that their team can be taken away. Regardless of how well the team has done financially, compared to the competition. For this reason alone, O' Malley never should have been voted into the HOF.
                  I don't understand why people feel that O'Malley should have given up a team that he owned, and been forced to start out again at the bottom with an expansion team. With Shea Stadium on the horizon, and Ebbets Field scheduled from demolition, the prospect of Brooklyn getting an expansion team was probably nil. If O'Malley had been forced to seel, then he probably would have been forced to sell the team for below-market value.

                  Call me cynical, but I've never seen professional sports as a public trust. I enjoy going to games, but I don't feel like a part of things or find an indentity with professional sports or with teams in any sport. Professional sports is a money making venture, pure and simple, and I find it silly that people excoriate a guy like O'Malley, who simply wanted to get more money out of it.

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