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  • #16
    Originally posted by DODGER DEB View Post
    I'm curious, how many of you actually saw OUR DODGERS play in 1957, as I did?

    c.
    When is your book coming out?

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    • #17
      dodgers

      dodger deb: i attended many dodger games in 1957. also in 1956. i attended 5 games in '55 and my first (in person) was 1954.
      you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
      http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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      • #18
        I was 9 in November of '57, but saw them play a few games in '56 and '57.

        One game that I went to and still stands out in my mind was the fight between Johnny Logan and Don Drysdale. I even remember the picture on the first page of the Daily Mirror the next day, where you saw a whole bunch of players and Drysdale's big head standing higher than all of them.

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        • #19
          the brooks finished out by 11 games, now as I recall I could be wrong, but there was a road trip where we lost four in a row to the phillies and pirates. I'll try and check when I'm done. I also remember being at a game in ebbets field against the phillies and we lost. I think It was the third in a row. it also just seemed like the pirates beat us more than usual that year. now I have to admit I didn't go as often in 57. so if i'm wrong I know all of you will let me know. it has been 50 yrs. I missed the last game, I could have gone I just didn't. battlin bake the dodger dynamo

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          • #20
            I was there to see "your" Dodgers, DD, when they played "my" Giants [with apologies to Russ Hodges] at the Polo Grounds. Every now and again we'd get to the bandbox, your shrine. :-) My aunt Sunny lived across the street on Bedford Ave. Her brother, my grandfather, and I were the only Giants fans in the family. We'd stop by before the games and they'd argue Mays-Snider using all of the seven words that made George Carlin famous.
            Here's a link to a post on my blog about those days:
            http://pushpull.wordpress.com/2007/0...-soft-mine-is/
            ---
            Pushing on the doors of life marked "pull."
            Visit my blogsigpic

            Comment


            • #21
              The 1957 Dodgers were only a game behind as late as July 25 and only 2 back on August 1. They then lost 8 of their next 12 and were 7.5 back on August 13. 1957 was an unusual year in that there were 5 teams within 2 games of the lead as late as July 16. On that date the Dodgers were a half game out and in fouth.

              They had the best pitching in the league but the starting lineup probably was the oldest in the league and no longer up to the rigors of a close race:

              Campy - 35
              Hodges - 33
              Gilliam - 28
              Reese - 38
              Neal - 26
              Cimoli - 27
              Snider - 30
              Furillo - 35

              The best illustration of the decline is the drop in HR from 179 in 1956 to 147. They led the league in saves but the relievers were overworked, which likely explains their 25-30 record in one run games.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Rome Colonel View Post
                The 1957 Dodgers were only a game behind as late as July 25 and only 2 back on August 1. They then lost 8 of their next 12 and were 7.5 back on August 13. 1957 was an unusual year in that there were 5 teams within 2 games of the lead as late as July 16. On that date the Dodgers were a half game out and in fouth.

                They had the best pitching in the league but the starting lineup probably was the oldest in the league and no longer up to the rigors of a close race:

                Campy - 35
                Hodges - 33
                Gilliam - 28
                Reese - 38
                Neal - 26
                Cimoli - 27
                Snider - 30
                Furillo - 35

                The best illustration of the decline is the drop in HR from 179 in 1956 to 147. They led the league in saves but the relievers were overworked, which likely explains their 25-30 record in one run games.

                As the legendary Nutsy O'Brien (the sage of McKeever Place) himself said so often to the faithful at EF who gathered daily for his counsel, you couldn't be righter, Rome Colonel.

                Comment


                • #23
                  It Seems To Me...

                  Sadly enough, it seems to me that Walter "The Dybbuk" O'Malley would have moved the team no matter what. O'Malley wasn't a Brooklynite and he wasn't much of a Dodger fan, he just held the team primarily for investment purposes. When greenbacks beckoned, he ran to them like a love-starved sailor on shore leave.

                  What is most despicable about O'Malley's decision is that NOT only did it remove the Dodgers from a hometown where they had a century's pedigree, but that the move went a long way toward sending Brooklyn into a decades-long decline. Brooklyn historians mark the departure of the Dodgers as the end of an era and even the death of a complete subculture, and it's often said that "Brooklyn has never been the same."

                  The Borough certainly became a backwater for quite a few years in the '70s '80s and into the '90s, and it's only more recently that Brooklyn has again become a desirable address---the slow upturn began around 2000, interestingly enough, around the time that the Cyclones began playing in Keyspan Park.

                  If O'Malley hadn't been a &@!%, he could have been an urban hero in Brooklyn. Imagine if he had pushed solidly for a new stadium in Brooklyn (or, alternatively, if he'd moved the team to Flushing Meadow). In the first instance, he would have been responsible for reinvigorating Brooklyn with a dose of well-deserved urban renewal. In the alternative, he would have given Brooklyn-based fans and Long Island transplants a rendezvous point. In the best of all possible worlds, the Dodgers and the Giants could have shared Flushing Meadow for a few years until the new Brooklyn stadium was built.

                  Even if the Dodgers had played in Queens permanently, the move to more or less "da 'boibs" wouldn't have denatured the team or its fans. There's a huge difference between moving up the block as opposed to moving all the way to hell and yonder. You keep most of your friends when you move to a new house on the next street. You don't when you leave the neighborhood.

                  A baseball team carries a mystique and an identity that its fans share, and never more so than with our Dodgers. Growing up in Brooklyn in the Sixties, baseball was never a big deal in our house, but I later discovered that my parents had been diehard Dodger fans who felt betrayed by the Left Coast Imposters---They were called the Los Angeles Traitors in our house, and for a while I thought that was the name of the team. In 1986, my Dad took my Mom to Shea to see the Mets trounce the Traitors; he swore never to take my Mom to another game after she (a very proper lady) went slightly out of her mind every time the Mets scored---"Take that you traitors! That's what you get for leaving Brooklyn!" People were STARING at her. Then they started screaming the same thing.

                  Whatever else you can say about Robert Moses, Mayor Wagner, mineral rights in Chavez Ravine, urban decay, or less-than sellout crowds at Ebbets Field, the decision was always the Dybbuk's. His choice to move the team to that collection of suburbs in search of a city was the first example of modern day corporate greed, the first slip on the slippery slope that's moved American industry to Mexico and Brazil, gives our kids Chinese lead poisoning, and forces us talk to people in Bombay when we call customer service.

                  What a legacy, huh?
                  Spirit of '55:cap:

                  "Let's Bring The Dodgers Home Before The Big Quake, Else The Fault Will Be Ours!"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Spirit of '55 View Post
                    Sadly enough, it seems to me that Walter "The Dybbuk" O'Malley would have moved the team no matter what. O'Malley wasn't a Brooklynite and he wasn't much of a Dodger fan, he just held the team primarily for investment purposes. When greenbacks beckoned, he ran to them like a love-starved sailor on shore leave.

                    What is most despicable about O'Malley's decision is that NOT only did it remove the Dodgers from a hometown where they had a century's pedigree, but that the move went a long way toward sending Brooklyn into a decades-long decline. Brooklyn historians mark the departure of the Dodgers as the end of an era and even the death of a complete subculture, and it's often said that "Brooklyn has never been the same."

                    The Borough certainly became a backwater for quite a few years in the '70s '80s and into the '90s, and it's only more recently that Brooklyn has again become a desirable address---the slow upturn began around 2000, interestingly enough, around the time that the Cyclones began playing in Keyspan Park.

                    If O'Malley hadn't been a &@!%, he could have been an urban hero in Brooklyn. Imagine if he had pushed solidly for a new stadium in Brooklyn (or, alternatively, if he'd moved the team to Flushing Meadow). In the first instance, he would have been responsible for reinvigorating Brooklyn with a dose of well-deserved urban renewal. In the alternative, he would have given Brooklyn-based fans and Long Island transplants a rendezvous point. In the best of all possible worlds, the Dodgers and the Giants could have shared Flushing Meadow for a few years until the new Brooklyn stadium was built.

                    Even if the Dodgers had played in Queens permanently, the move to more or less "da 'boibs" wouldn't have denatured the team or its fans. There's a huge difference between moving up the block as opposed to moving all the way to hell and yonder. You keep most of your friends when you move to a new house on the next street. You don't when you leave the neighborhood.

                    A baseball team carries a mystique and an identity that its fans share, and never more so than with our Dodgers. Growing up in Brooklyn in the Sixties, baseball was never a big deal in our house, but I later discovered that my parents had been diehard Dodger fans who felt betrayed by the Left Coast Imposters---They were called the Los Angeles Traitors in our house, and for a while I thought that was the name of the team. In 1986, my Dad took my Mom to Shea to see the Mets trounce the Traitors; he swore never to take my Mom to another game after she (a very proper lady) went slightly out of her mind every time the Mets scored---"Take that you traitors! That's what you get for leaving Brooklyn!" People were STARING at her. Then they started screaming the same thing.

                    Whatever else you can say about Robert Moses, Mayor Wagner, mineral rights in Chavez Ravine, urban decay, or less-than sellout crowds at Ebbets Field, the decision was always the Dybbuk's. His choice to move the team to that collection of suburbs in search of a city was the first example of modern day corporate greed, the first slip on the slippery slope that's moved American industry to Mexico and Brazil, gives our kids Chinese lead poisoning, and forces us talk to people in Bombay when we call customer service.

                    What a legacy, huh?
                    Thank you, spirit of "55", and welcome to OUR little corner of BBF. Actually it's a rather large corner, since WE are one of the top rated forums here. Considering the fact that WE haven't had an active team in 50 years, it's quite a tribute to all loyal and true BROOKLYN DODGER FANS, that still exist all over this country.

                    I agree that the "Big O" could have been crowned a HERO in BROOKLYN, like none other, had he just used some smarts and allowed himself to see the forest for the trees. Instead, he allowed his ego and his greed to get the best of him. The riches he would have enjoyed, both body and soul, MLB would never have seen the likes of, had he chosen to honor his own words, "MY ROOTS are in BROOKLYN". Instead, he chose to run to a foreign place where he, and OUR team, have never been honored or appreciated, the way they were, and would have continued to be at HOME in BROOKLYN.

                    c.
                    Last edited by DODGER DEB; 11-25-2007, 09:12 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by DODGER DEB View Post
                      I'm curious, how many of you actually saw OUR DODGERS play in 1957, as I did?

                      c.
                      Like I've said many times, I was very young during the Dodgers last Brooklyn years but I attended games with my mom and dad, remember them or not, right up to the time they moved.

                      As far as 1957 and a championship goes, I think O'Malley was business man FIRST and a sportsman NEVER. He saw the opportunity out west and I think the SOB was going no matter what.
                      http://www.nflfans.com/x/forumdisplay.php?f=55 :atthepc

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