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  • OUR BROOKLYN DODGERS in Literature!

    In addition to the two history threads already posted, I thought it appropriate to set up a thread for OUR BROOKLYN DODGER LITERATURE.

    I will start by posting this book, written by RED BARBER in 1947, the beginning of OUR incredible 10 year run (1947/1957). There have been many, many books written about OUR BROOKLYN DODGERS, so please include them here on this thread for all to see.




    From an eBay listing.

    c.

  • #2
    WOW! There are so many books out there. Where to start?
    "Boys of Summer", by Roger Kahn is considered the bible of Brooklyn Dodger history, and is an excellent read. The movie made with the same name is also an excellent doc.
    "Images of Sports: Brooklyn Dodgers" by Mark Rucker has tons of vintage photos encompassing the entire history of the Brooklyn team. One of my favorite photo books.
    "Tales from the Dodgers Dugout" by Carl Erskine includes hundreds of ancedotes from him about the Dodgers teams he played on. A great read, the type of book you can read for 5 minutes or hours. Lots of funny, and informative short stories.
    "The Last Good Season" by Michael Shapiro paints a beautiful picture of 1956 Brooklyn, not just the team, but the borough, and the shady behind the scenes dealings of O'Money. While Shapiro lays equal blame on Robert Moses, the book does include good research on the team and the city.
    unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
    unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
    unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

    Comment


    • #3
      For those who have not read this book, you are in for a real treat. Though it is fiction, to all US loyal and true BROOKLYN DODGER fans, it tugs at OUR hearts with a forever ...."if only"!




      From an eBay listing.

      c.

      Comment


      • #4
        Another is The Sporting Life by Iriving Rudd, the press agent for the Brooklyn Dodgers, This is what he says "Here we live and die with the guys. Brooklyn is a state of mind, not a place. It is our team, our game, and we gigure, our rights are being violated. It is the richest team in the majors and still the O is going to pull up stakes in the city."
        Unlike many associated with the team, Rudd resigned rather than go to Los Angeles.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Flatbush Flock
          Another is The Sporting Life by Iriving Rudd, the press agent for the Brooklyn Dodgers, This is what he says "Here we live and die with the guys. Brooklyn is a state of mind, not a place. It is our team, our game, and we gigure, our rights are being violated. It is the richest team in the majors and still the O is going to pull up stakes in the city."
          Unlike many associated with the team, Rudd resigned rather than go to Los Angeles.

          That he did, indeed!

          c.

          Comment


          • #6


            All the way through the regaling that Joseph McCauley works in his tale of Ebbets Field, you have an inkling of the envy you'll eventually feel when you come to finish this really great story of a truly unique time in the history of man -- when one could trust his eight-year-old daughter to her ten-year-old brother and a fistful of change, alone at a double-header in a major league ballpark, surrounded by what had become to them the family of Dose Bums and their fans! I resolved, as I put down this book, that I wished to be 50 years older, when you had a chance to be a member of that great gathering.

            McCauley tells the story of more than merely a structure. His is the story of a place and a time when professional ball players talked with you and you talked with them as friends and co-admirers, not combatants; when the players lived in your neighborhood and, at times, even knew you by name; when you heard not only the crack of the bat at the crack of dawn, but often the closing of the bar with some of the team, much later after the game, win of lose. As McCauley tells it, you went to Ebbets not merely to support your Dodgers but 'cause that's what there was to do 'round Brooklyn -- and what there was to do there was lots of fun!

            And was there a lot to do! McCauley spins the stories out nearly faster than they can be caught -- of games won and lost, championships had and missed, players coming and going and always remaining memorable, of Holy Name Society gatherings and college football matches and circuses and side shows and hot-dog venders and amateur musicians, and more variants thereon than I had thought possible, finally coming to conclusion 'midst the mess of a demolition derby preceding the demolition ball.

            When the grand ole' place finally meets her demise, you lament not only for what was but for all those who partook, as performers whether on the field or in the stands -- and you wish you could've been there, too!

            (Review and Photo from Amazon.com)

            Comment


            • #7
              "Bums" by Peter Golenbock is an incredible book about the Brooks that has first hand accounts by just about every important figure involved in Brooklyn Dodger baseball from the mid-30's through 1957. The book was released in 1984, so alot of those who have left us are heard from in the book. One of my favorite books of all time, along with "Boys of Summer."
              "... then you would run for Gibson and have Sax batting. But, we have a big 3-2 pitch coming here from Eckersley. Gibson swings, and a fly ball to deep right field! This is gonna be a home run! Unbelievable! A home run for Gibson! And the Dodgers have won the game, 5 to 4, I don't believe what I just saw!"

              Jack Buck, 10/15/88

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by zman


                All the way through the regaling that Joseph McCauley works in his tale of Ebbets Field, you have an inkling of the envy you'll eventually feel when you come to finish this really great story of a truly unique time in the history of man -- when one could trust his eight-year-old daughter to her ten-year-old brother and a fistful of change, alone at a double-header in a major league ballpark, surrounded by what had become to them the family of Dose Bums and their fans! I resolved, as I put down this book, that I wished to be 50 years older, when you had a chance to be a member of that great gathering.

                McCauley tells the story of more than merely a structure. His is the story of a place and a time when professional ball players talked with you and you talked with them as friends and co-admirers, not combatants; when the players lived in your neighborhood and, at times, even knew you by name; when you heard not only the crack of the bat at the crack of dawn, but often the closing of the bar with some of the team, much later after the game, win of lose. As McCauley tells it, you went to Ebbets not merely to support your Dodgers but 'cause that's what there was to do 'round Brooklyn -- and what there was to do there was lots of fun!

                And was there a lot to do! McCauley spins the stories out nearly faster than they can be caught -- of games won and lost, championships had and missed, players coming and going and always remaining memorable, of Holy Name Society gatherings and college football matches and circuses and side shows and hot-dog venders and amateur musicians, and more variants thereon than I had thought possible, finally coming to conclusion 'midst the mess of a demolition derby preceding the demolition ball.

                When the grand ole' place finally meets her demise, you lament not only for what was but for all those who partook, as performers whether on the field or in the stands -- and you wish you could've been there, too!

                (Review and Photo from Amazon.com)

                Zman, do you know that Joe is a member of OUR Forum, and has been for a long time?

                This book was a labor of love for him, when you consider that he never stepped foot into OUR Ebbets Field. It never ceases to amaze me how far and wide OUR wonderful story of OUR BROOKLYN DODGERS and OUR Ebbets Field reached. and how alive it still remains, after all these years. :gt

                c.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                  Zman, do you know that Joe is a member of OUR Forum, and has been for a long time?

                  This book was a labor of love for him, when you consider that he never stepped foot into OUR Ebbets Field. It never ceases to amaze me how far and wide OUR wonderful story of OUR BROOKLYN DODGERS and OUR Ebbets Field reached. and how alive it still remains, after all these years. :gt

                  c.
                  I made the connection only recently, Deb. Easy to understand the great reviews it's gotten. In addition to the wonderful writing there's plenty of rare photos to rekindle the memories of fans who were there and to conjure up a taste of the magic for those of us who wern't. A hearty thanks and congratulations to you, Mr. McCauley.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You guys really made my day!!!
                    The past few years have been a lot of fun. Talking with and meeting Dodger fans all across the country really impressed me and made this book a labor of love for all of you.
                    I was impressed with the Brooklyn faithful I saw at my speech at the Hall of Fame on June 18th. Former batboy Bil Phifer came all the way from Pennsylvania and he had some great stories (many I couldn't put in the book) that he shared with me.
                    I even met some Dodger faithful in Ann Arbor, Michigan when I made an appearance at the Gerald Ford Presidential Library with former Dodger Don Lund.
                    I had many ask for signed copies and I have done whatever I could to get out the word. Ernie Harwell even mentioned the book in his newspaper column.
                    The best place to order the book is at Authorhouse.com. They sell it for around $20.
                    Unfortunately, Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com have it at over $32 and that kind of screwed book sales. There was nothing I could do with their pricing.
                    Thanks again for the kind words.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you haven't read this book, you should! It is a terrific read. The Lords of Baseball by Harold Parrott,(pictured with The Captain and Preacher Roe), a former Business Manager and Traveling Secretary for OUR Dodgers.....


                      From an eBay lisitng.

                      c.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin is a magnificient recollection of a young girl's adolescence ruled by devotion to the Dodgers. Ms. Goodwin is historian, baseball historian, and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. A great read.



                        Branch Rickey's Little Blue Book, (preface by Stan Musial) is a wondrous primer on the great innovator's methods & philosophies.



                        Carl Prince's Brooklyn's Dodgers is also a slender,quick paced account of Brooklyndom.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Harold Parrott and Carl Prince books are great.
                          Every Diamond Doesn't Sparkle by Fresco Thompson is pretty interesting and darn funny.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                            If you haven't read this book, you should! It is a terrific read. The Lords of Baseball by Harold Parrott,(pictured with The Captain and Preacher Roe), a former Business Manager and Traveling Secretary for OUR Dodgers.....


                            From an eBay lisitng.

                            c.
                            This is a book everyone should read, it is very enlightening. A real behind the scenes look.
                            Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
                            www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tonypug
                              This is a book everyone should read, it is very enlightening. A real behind the scenes look.

                              I found the book disappointing because it says virtually nothing about the move to LA and the cirumstances which led to it.

                              Comment

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