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It's a Great Day for Brooklyn!

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  • dodger dynamo
    replied
    rzt he sure was a great baseball man. still you know because he was ousted before most of the championships he has been overlooked by many in baseball. the dodgers all but tried to erase him from their history along with carl furillo after o'malley took over. It's a disgrace, a sad pitiful disgrace. battlin bake, the dodger dynamo

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  • dodger dynamo
    replied
    I so feel that way to. battlin bake the dodger dynamo. fellas just great stuff. battlin bake, the dodger dynamo

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  • Spirit of '55
    replied
    Dear Todd:

    Thanks for the memories! Those are great stories.

    You know, the more I think about it, the more convinced I am that someday the team will return to Brooklyn. After all, the salmon always swim upstream and the swallows come back to Capistrano.

    We inherit tales of Ebbets Field.

    Even today, young Brooklynites remember the Dodgers. It isn't just us and ours. Like the Sox beating out the Yanks, there's a kind of cosmic inevitability to it.

    Someday. Sooner than we think. And in anticipation, I'll keep my hat on

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  • Todd Anderson
    replied
    Bless yer heart, Spirit. My mom suffered from Alzheimers for four years before passing on a couple of years ago. I can relate to your journey and give you high praise for your involvement in your parents golden years.

    Two quick things:

    !. My mom would recognize my "Brooklyn" hat when I'd visit her. She could relive those days spent living there during my dad's brief stint as a catcher. I was astounded how some things like that were still remained in her memory for so long!

    2. I was on a tram-ride that was taking folks from the parking area into Silver Dollar City in Branson, Missouri. This happened about a year ago.

    I was wearing my Brooklyn ball hat when a guy said, "Hey, that's a Brooklyn hat! Don't see those much anymore."
    I asked the man how he knew about it—if he lived in New York.
    He said, "No my dad played for 'em."
    I replied, "You're kidding? My dad did, TOO!"
    (The whole tram perked up listening to us.)
    "Who was your dad?" I asked him.
    "My dad was Mickey Owen—a catcher for Brooklyn."
    "MICKEY OWEN?" Holy cow!," I shouted. "YOUR dad jumped to the Mexican league in 1946, which gave my dad a chance to become the starting catcher for Brooklyn that same year!"
    We had a great conversation. It was amazing! And to think, we would have never met...if it weren't for that HAT! I wear that puppy all the time now! haha

    Sorry to ramble. Just thought you'd get a kick outta that.
    Best wishes,
    Todd (Anderson)
    Andy's #3 son

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  • Spirit of '55
    replied
    Friends:

    I got a treat last night!

    My Dad, who has dementia, turned 79 last week. I bought us both Brooklyn Dodgers caps to celebrate his birthday---my Dad loves ballcaps and hasn't not worn one in years.

    Living in South Florida, the cap has attracted a lot of attention. My Mom was telling me last night that she is simply AMAZED how many old neighborhood Brooklynites come up to my Dad and start talking about the Dodgers with him, congratulate him, and want to know where to get a hat like his.

    Considering they live in Retirement Central I'm surprised that she's surprised.

    I stopped off to visit them last night and my Dad launched into a wonderful reminiscence of the first ballgame he ever saw. He came from Europe after WWII, arriving here on January 1, 1947. His first ballgame was at Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947---Jackie Robinson's debut.

    I was stunned as he began recounting in detail not only the game but the fact that he'd brown-bagged his own salami sandwich, and how he was shoulder-to-shoulder with all these nice people---"It was like being in my own living room. It was a baseball game in your lap."

    It was a blast to hear him talk about the first day crowd's reaction to Jackie, which, he says, was very ordinary---"Yeah, yeah, but can he play ball? is all I care about."

    My Mom contributed by giving me the names of every player on the 1955 team and their field position. "What's this? You know this?"

    "It's my team!" she snorted.

    This from people who haven't looked at a sports page since I've known them. Dementia's terrible. It's great that he remembers Number 42. I just wish he could remember where he lives when he wanders off.

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  • DODGER DEB
    replied
    Originally posted by Mattingly View Post
    I happened across this Jan 7, 1997 article from the Times about the restaurant:

    Brooklyn Has a Reason To Smirk
    Thanks for reminding me of this article, Matt, and for posting it for all BROOKLYN DODGER FANS here on OUR forum whohave never read it.

    What goes around, comes around. Those words will ring more true in the months to come.

    c.

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  • Mattingly
    replied
    I happened across this Jan 7, 1997 article from the Times about the restaurant:

    Brooklyn Has a Reason To Smirk
    AN O'Malley put a ''for sale'' sign on the Dodgers yesterday -- 40 years too late for Brooklyn.

    But from Flatbush to Bensonhurst, from Red Hook to Coney Island, anyone who remembered how the late Walter O'Malley hijacked the Dodgers to Los Angeles after the 1957 season had to be smirking when they learned of the devotion of his son, Peter O'Malley, to the Los Angeles community.

    Asked about the possibility of international buyers, Peter O'Malley never hesitated.

    ''Commitment to community, to Los Angeles and to Southern California is the No. 1 priority,'' the Dodgers' president said. ''The franchise has meant so much to so many people in this community for so long.''

    Once upon a time the same Dodger franchise meant so much to so many people in another community for so long, too -- Brooklyn.
    But when Walter O'Malley hurried to Los Angeles and persuaded his accomplice, Horace Stoneham, to take the New York Giants to San Francisco, people realized that baseball was a business, not a game. That if there was more money to be made elsewhere, Walter O'Malley wanted to make it. That the community that had supported the Dodgers for so long suddenly no longer mattered.

    It's a philosophy that Al Davis and Art Modell, who both grew up in Brooklyn then, would later use to justify bouncing National Football League clubs from one city to another.

    Now, ironically, baseball is such a big business, Peter O'Malley acknowledged that ''estate planning'' was ''probably the best reason'' why the franchise was now on the market.

    The guess here is that the Dodgers will sell for at least $350 million, a price that would include Dodger Stadium as well as the club's real estate in Vero Beach, Fla., and the Dominican Republic. Peter O'Malley, however, was talking about family estate planning, primarily inheritance taxes.

    But in Brooklyn they remember the Dodgers' hallowed real estate, Ebbets Field, where red-brick apartment houses now testify to Walter O'Malley's departure.

    Now there's only one ''Brooklyn Dodger'' left in Brooklyn, a restaurant and bar by that revered name on Third Avenue at 75th Street in Bay Ridge not far from the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. And late yesterday afternoon one of its owners, Richard Picardi, talked about Peter O'Malley's announcement.

    ''We're still here,'' Picardi said, ''but Goliath is leaving.''

    All around the ''Brooklyn Dodger'' are framed reminders of another Brooklyn when Ebbets Field was baseball's best ball park, when Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Duke Snider, Gil Hodges, Carl Furillo, Don Newcombe, Carl Erskine, Preacher Roe and Clem Labine wore those creamy white uniforms with ''Dodgers'' in blue script across the chest and blue caps with a white ''B'' on them.

    In those years, Walter O'Malley's home was in Amityville, L.I., but earlier he had lived on Maple Street in Flatbush.

    ''After the Dodgers left,'' Picardi said, ''my father drove me down Maple Street one day, pointed to a house and said, 'Richie, that's where that bum lived.' My father had a box seat at Ebbets Field. My father never forgave Walter O'Malley.''

    In Brooklyn not many, if any, forgave Walter O'Malley for abandoning the community. And at the Brooklyn Dodger restaurant they haven't forgiven Peter O'Malley, either.

    ''When we opened 10 years ago,'' Picard said, ''we got a letter from Peter O'Malley wishing us good luck, but a year later we got another letter that the Dodgers were suing us for using the name. Two or three years ago they finally dropped the suit.''

    And now Peter O'Malley has put his own ''for sale'' sign on the last of baseball's family-owned franchises.

    ''Family ownership is probably a dying breed,'' O'Malley said. ''It's as high risk as the oil business. You need a broader base than a family.''

    Peter O'Malley has only his father to blame for making the first move that turned the perception of baseball from a game to a business that is now a risky business ever since free agency allowed players to do what owners such as Walter O'Malley had done: move from one community to another.

    And now, 40 years too late, the Dodgers are for sale. Brooklyn is smirking.

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  • dodger dynamo
    replied
    I think today I'll remember and honor one of the greatest baseball minds of all time. Mr. branch Rickey. wish I could get a hold of branch Barrett rickey, branch's grandson. who by all accounts has done a terrific job in the pacific coast league. why no big league club has hired obviously another great base ball mind as a gm is beyond me. mccourt or any owner should consider this. I'd like to know if he'd be interested in the job?. BRANCH RICKEY THE REAL ARCHITECT OF THE GREAT DODGER TEAMS OF THE LATE 40'S AND 50'S. you know what does my heart good is the fact than when he was forced out he left with a nice chunk of o'malley's money. way to go mahatma! that would be a nice chant at coopers town. shouting RICKEY! very loudly every time they mention o'malley. battlin bake, the dodger dynamo
    Last edited by dodger dynamo; 12-05-2007, 11:18 AM.

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  • Spirit of '55
    replied
    The Brooklyn Dodger Bar

    Friends:

    It doesn't surprise me that the owners of the Brooklyn Dodger Bar sold it after all the hoopla. Even though their Attorney Russo had apparently taken the case pro bono, so that it didn't cost them much money, the stress of the thing was probably enough to send them to the big batting cage---all the three thousand hours of high-pressure yaya that went on with the case itself probably caused arguments, slacked-off business management, maybe less customers---and if the Los Angeles Traitors were even making a peep about appealing to the higher court that would have been enough to call it quits. Representation in the Federal Circuit Court wouldn't have been a pro bono job, and neither would an appeal to the Supreme Court; and the Traitors certainly have the money to go all the way up that ladder.

    Still, it's a great idea for a theme bar, and the use of the name is allowable. The irony is that the new owners could have kept the name without a problem.

    It's just a damned shame that Petey Boy decided to be a %[email protected]! and sue a little neighborhood watering hole 3,000 miles from Lost Angels just because the owners were nice enough to send him a standing invitation for a drink. Like father, like son. It just proves that it's always been just business to those two.

    What I don't get is the letter that started it all. Why say you're "honoring" the Traitors at all? The Traitors aren't worthy of honor. And there's no honor among thieves anyway. What they were honoring was the BROOKLYN Dodgers, and that's a whole different thing.

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  • penncentralpete
    replied
    Rickey

    Mr. Branch Rickey
    Attached Files

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  • aqib
    replied
    Originally posted by musial6 View Post
    Rickey had a heart attack on November 13, 1965, while being inducted into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame. He went into a coma immediately and died on December 9, 1965, at Boone County Memorial Hospital, Columbia, Missouri.
    Branch Rickey is a native Ohioan (like Walter Alston), both are buried here in their home state.

    I was at a politcal event earlier this year (I won't mention which party so as to not start that argument) but anyway the governor mentioned that this year was the 60th Anniversary of Jackie Robinson and LArry Doby (breaking he color barrier in the AL with the Indians) and that the guy who brought him up to the majors was also from Ohio. So he is still loved our here in his home state.

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  • penncentralpete
    replied
    Originally posted by xtimx View Post
    that bar is a few blocks from my house. i remember all the crap revolving around that. its now called the salty dog. i always wondered why they changed the name after going through all that and winning.
    yeah, that's weird. did they sell??? have you been in there lately? any dodgers' stuff hanging up?

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  • xtimx
    replied
    that bar is a few blocks from my house. i remember all the crap revolving around that. its now called the salty dog. i always wondered why they changed the name after going through all that and winning.

    Leave a comment:


  • penncentralpete
    replied
    Originally posted by dodger dynamo View Post
    you know something I'm no huge fan of peter o'malley after he sued the brooklyn dodger bar owner, but I bet the big O kept the little o in the dark like the rest of us and of course spoon fed him all of his propaganda. when his father died peter should have done something to improve his own image in brooklyn. instead he furtherd a legacy of the man many despise by ingnoring what was done to brooklyn and even tried to add to it. battlin bake, the dodger dynamo
    yeah, peter o'malley blew his chance. he merely continued the horrible ways of his daddy.

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  • dodger dynamo
    replied
    you know something I'm no huge fan of peter o'malley after he sued the brooklyn dodger bar owner, but I bet the big O kept the little o in the dark like the rest of us and of course spoon fed him all of his propaganda. when his father died peter should have done something to improve his own image in brooklyn. instead he furtherd a legacy of the man many despise by ingnoring what was done to brooklyn and even tried to add to it. battlin bake, the dodger dynamo

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