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72 Years Ago Today-Feb. 23, 1934

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  • 72 Years Ago Today-Feb. 23, 1934

    Casey Stengel, former BROOKLYN player from 1912-1917 and current coach, is named manager of the BROOKLYN DODGERS, replacing Max Carey.

    Unfortunately, Ol' Case didn't enjoy much success. The DODGERS would finish 71-81 (6th place) in 1934, 70-83 (5th place in 1935) and drop to 67-87 (7th) in 1936 before Burleigh Grimes took over as manager in 1937.

    For a complete list of BROOKLYN managerial records (courtesy of Baseball-Almanac), check out this link:

    http://baseball-almanac.com/mgrtmld2.shtml
    "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

    "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

  • #2
    Old Casey probably never thought it could be any worse managing a team until he came back to the Polo Grounds and took on the Mets.h

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Paulmcall
      Old Casey probably never thought it could be any worse managing a team until he came back to the Polo Grounds and took on the Mets.h
      I think it got worse.
      When he went to Boston Braves finishing in seventh place four times and recording a winning record only once. The worst part was when he missed the first 47 games of the 1943 season in Boston, having suffered a broken leg when a taxicab hit him. A local sports columnist wrote, “The man who did the most for baseball in Boston was the motorist who ran down Stengel and kept him away from the Braves for two months.” Stengel was canned at the end of that year.
      Johnny
      Delusion, Life's Coping Mechanism

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      • #4
        Somehow though, he went from the Outhouse to the Penthouse.. Who'da thunk it??

        All of the below is the reason why Casey got a skeptical reception from the New York press when he took over to helm the Yankees in 1949, succeeding Bucky Harris.


        Originally posted by johnny
        I think it got worse.
        When he went to Boston Braves finishing in seventh place four times and recording a winning record only once. The worst part was when he missed the first 47 games of the 1943 season in Boston, having suffered a broken leg when a taxicab hit him. A local sports columnist wrote, “The man who did the most for baseball in Boston was the motorist who ran down Stengel and kept him away from the Braves for two months.” Stengel was canned at the end of that year.

        Originally posted by paulmcall
        Old Casey probably never thought it could be any worse managing a team until he came back to the Polo Grounds and took on the Mets.

        Originally posted by Aa3rt
        Casey Stengel, former BROOKLYN player from 1912-1917 and current coach, is named manager of the BROOKLYN DODGERS, replacing Max Carey.

        Unfortunately, Ol' Case didn't enjoy much success. The DODGERS would finish 71-81 (6th place) in 1934, 70-83 (5th place in 1935) and drop to 67-87 (7th) in 1936 before Burleigh Grimes took over as manager in 1937.

        For a complete list of BROOKLYN managerial records (courtesy of Baseball-Almanac), check out this link:

        http://baseball-almanac.com/mgrtmld2.shtml

        Comment


        • #5
          A Manager is no better than the horses he is riding.
          Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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