Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another person sees the light

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another person sees the light

    Two years ago, I visited the office of a woman working in a Western State who had a bunch of pictures of that nameless team in her office. Her son had just signed with this team. I told her that baseball was never the same after the Dodgers left Brooklyn, and money became the only issue in baseball.
    We spoke this week. Her son who had gotten to AA, quit baseball because the team would not give him any idea of where he stood in their future plans. She said to me "You were right when you said that baseball changed for the worse after the Dodgers left Brooklyn, and baseball is only about money."

  • #2
    Originally posted by Flatbush Flock
    Two years ago, I visited the office of a woman working in a Western State who had a bunch of pictures of that nameless team in her office. Her son had just signed with this team. I told her that baseball was never the same after the Dodgers left Brooklyn, and money became the only issue in baseball.
    We spoke this week. Her son who had gotten to AA, quit baseball because the team would not give him any idea of where he stood in their future plans. She said to me "You were right when you said that baseball changed for the worse after the Dodgers left Brooklyn, and baseball is only about money."
    Since when is a baseball team obligated to map out their players future for them? Things change on ANY ballclub from day to day. One day you're called up, the next, you're shipped back down. What was he expecting - a written guarantee to make the AAA team? Maybe he should've hung in there anyway. They'd have to rip the uniform from me if I was playing pro ball. I can't imagine quiting baseball.

    Of course baseball is about money and always has been. How do you think Babe Ruth ended up with the Yankees and Hank Greenberg ended up in Pittsburgh? MONEY. Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner were all salary holdouts in their careers. 2-time batting champ Edd Roush sat out the entire 1930 season in a salary holdout. It's always been a money game because it's always been big business. That doesn't mean it's not still the most beautiful and delicious game on earth and this is the best time of year! The sounds of Spring are here! Don't you love baseball anymore?
    Last edited by Elvis; 02-25-2006, 11:28 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      IMO there is too much money involved in baseball nowadays. But it is silly to say that that is the reason why a team can not tell what their plans are for the future of a player.

      What age did her son have? His career was only two years old. Did he expect that he would be in the majors by now?

      Take Chairon Isenia (catcher of the Montgomery Biscuits) for example. His first professional year was 1996 when he played for the Devil Rays in the DSL.
      Since then he has been moving from single A to AA and is still not close to the Majors. It can always be worse. I think her son has stopped too early.

      Comment


      • #4
        money ball

        Ah, sadly, yes, it's always been about the cash. Somebody has to pay somewhere. For those who have owned their own businesses, the romance ends when the bills come due. Yes, there's the romance of the game, especially for those of us, who as children, were fortunate enough to go to a game or two. Growing up in LA, I remember the early days of the westward migration when the Brooks came here, and how fortunate we all felt. As a kid, you didn't really know much history and couldn't really appreciate what had gone on before. Yep, Mr. O may be a scoundrel, but I've often wondered what any of us would have done in his position.

        The team immediately doubled its draw in the late 50's and early 60's, was able to sign and keep top talent, and extend the winning ways for a long time. But, like many CEO's today, being nice and being successful may not be the same thing. I mean to offend no one, so please forgive my perspective if it grates.

        I love the Dodgers' heritage, and after having been fortunate enough to have met Don Newcombe (and receiving a bear hug from him) I truly appreicate everything that came before. After reading about the negotiations in NY, and how no deal was struck, it becomes apparant that the team's owner (remaining nameless) made a difficult decision. Change does that to us...we often remain wistful of what was without realizing that what is to come may not rest well with us. Trust me, it's been a pretty painful 18 years since they last won anything, even with some pretty good talent.

        Comment


        • #5
          At the professional level baseball has always been about the money. Owners have always wanted to maximize their profits while the players have always wanted to maximize their salaries.
          Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

          Comment

          Ad Widget

          Collapse
          Working...
          X